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Thursday 18, August

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Thursday 18, August

Children of the Moon

Children of the Moon

Thursday 18, August

The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick

Rfor Sexual content including dialog and language.

Thursday 18, August

Friday 19, August

Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

Friday 19, August

EC: A King in New York

EC: A King in New York

Friday 19, August

Twilight Zone: The Movie

Twilight Zone: The Movie

Friday 19, August

Saturday 20, August

40,000 Years of Dreaming

40,000 Years of Dreaming

Saturday 20, August

EC: Gold Rush

EC: Gold Rush

Saturday 20, August

Lorenzo's Oil

Lorenzo's Oil

Saturday 20, August

EC: A King in New York

EC: A King in New York

Saturday 20, August

The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick

Rfor Sexual content including dialog and language.

Saturday 20, August

Sunday 21, August

Babe

Babe

G

Sunday 21, August

EC: Short Films by Charlie Chaplin, Program 2

EC: Short Films by Charlie Chaplin, Program 2

Sunday 21, August

Babe: Pig in the City

Babe: Pig in the City

Sunday 21, August

EC: A King in New York

EC: A King in New York

Sunday 21, August

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Sunday 21, August

Monday 22, August

Happy Feet

Happy Feet

PGfor some mild peril and rude humor

Monday 22, August

Mad Max

Mad Max

Monday 22, August

Tuesday 23, August

Happy Feet 2

Happy Feet 2

PGfor some rude humor and mild peril

Tuesday 23, August

Lorenzo's Oil

Lorenzo's Oil

Tuesday 23, August

Wednesday 24, August

Mad Max

Mad Max

Wednesday 24, August

The Little Richard Story

The Little Richard Story

Wednesday 24, August

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Wednesday 24, August

Thursday 25, August

Babe: Pig in the City

Babe: Pig in the City

Thursday 25, August

40,000 Years of Dreaming

40,000 Years of Dreaming

Thursday 25, August

Friday 26, August

The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick

Rfor Sexual content including dialog and language.

Friday 26, August

EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

Friday 26, August

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Friday 26, August

Mad Max: Fury Road (Black and Chrome)

Mad Max: Fury Road (Black and Chrome)

Friday 26, August

Saturday 27, August

Twilight Zone: The Movie

Twilight Zone: The Movie

Saturday 27, August

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Saturday 27, August

Babe

Babe

G

Saturday 27, August

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Saturday 27, August

Babe: Pig in the City

Babe: Pig in the City

Saturday 27, August

Sunday 28, August

Lorenzo's Oil

Lorenzo's Oil

Sunday 28, August

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Sunday 28, August

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Sunday 28, August

EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

Sunday 28, August

Mad Max: Fury Road (3D)

Mad Max: Fury Road (3D)

Sunday 28, August

Monday 29, August

Happy Feet

Happy Feet

PGfor some mild peril and rude humor

Monday 29, August

Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

Monday 29, August

Tuesday 30, August

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Tuesday 30, August

Happy Feet 2

Happy Feet 2

PGfor some rude humor and mild peril

Tuesday 30, August

Wednesday 31, August

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Wednesday 31, August

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Wednesday 31, August

Thursday 1, September

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Thursday 1, September

Ghost Artist

Ghost Artist

Thursday 1, September

Friday 2, September

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Friday 2, September

Ghost Artist

Ghost Artist

Friday 2, September

Saturday 3, September

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Saturday 3, September

Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

Saturday 3, September

Ghost Artist

Ghost Artist

Saturday 3, September

Sunday 4, September

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Sunday 4, September

Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

Sunday 4, September

Ghost Artist

Ghost Artist

Sunday 4, September

Monday 5, September

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Monday 5, September

EC: Joseph Cornell

EC: Joseph Cornell

Monday 5, September

Tuesday 6, September

EC: Conner / Conrad

EC: Conner / Conrad

Tuesday 6, September

EC: Cavalcanti / Crockwell

EC: Cavalcanti / Crockwell

Tuesday 6, September

Wednesday 7, September

EC: Maya Deren

EC: Maya Deren

Wednesday 7, September

EC: The Parson's Widow

EC: The Parson's Widow

Wednesday 7, September

Thursday 8, September

EC: Michael

EC: Michael

Thursday 8, September

Duffer

Duffer

Thursday 8, September

Friday 9, September

EC: The Passion of Joan of Arc

EC: The Passion of Joan of Arc

Friday 9, September

EC: Day of Wrath

EC: Day of Wrath

Friday 9, September

Saturday 10, September

Afterimage, Program 1

Afterimage, Program 1

Saturday 10, September

EC: Vampyr

EC: Vampyr

Saturday 10, September

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Saturday 10, September

EC: Day of Wrath

EC: Day of Wrath

Saturday 10, September

Sunday 11, September

EC: Day of Wrath

EC: Day of Wrath

Sunday 11, September

EC: Ordet

EC: Ordet

Sunday 11, September

Monday 12, September

EC: Gertrud

EC: Gertrud

Monday 12, September

Tuesday 13, September

So Is This + So's Nephew

So Is This + So's Nephew

Tuesday 13, September

Wednesday 14, September

EC: Zvenigora

EC: Zvenigora

Wednesday 14, September

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Wednesday 14, September

Thursday 15, September

Terra Femme (Live Version)

Terra Femme (Live Version)

Thursday 15, September

Friday 16, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Friday 16, September

Dirty Dancing

Dirty Dancing

Friday 16, September

Saturday 17, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Saturday 17, September

Word Films: Yann Beauvais

Word Films: Yann Beauvais

Saturday 17, September

Sunday 18, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Sunday 18, September

EC: Arsenal

EC: Arsenal

Sunday 18, September

Terra Femme (Live Version)

Terra Femme (Live Version)

Sunday 18, September

EC: Earth / Zemlya

EC: Earth / Zemlya

Sunday 18, September

Monday 19, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Monday 19, September

EC: Strike

EC: Strike

Monday 19, September

Tuesday 20, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Tuesday 20, September

EC: Battleship Potemkin

EC: Battleship Potemkin

Tuesday 20, September

Wednesday 21, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

Wednesday 21, September

Please Leave a Message

Please Leave a Message

Wednesday 21, September

Thursday 22, September

EC: October

EC: October

Thursday 22, September

(Projector) Performance

(Projector) Performance

Thursday 22, September

Friday 23, September

EC: Old and New

EC: Old and New

Friday 23, September

Pure Blood

Pure Blood

Friday 23, September

Saturday 24, September

Kalt in Kolumbien

Kalt in Kolumbien

Saturday 24, September

David Wharry: PGM 1

David Wharry: PGM 1

Saturday 24, September

David Wharry: PGM 2

David Wharry: PGM 2

Saturday 24, September

Bloody Flesh

Bloody Flesh

Saturday 24, September

Sunday 25, September

María Cano

María Cano

Sunday 25, September

David Wharry: PGM 3: Point Blank

David Wharry: PGM 3: Point Blank

Sunday 25, September

It All Started at the End

It All Started at the End

Sunday 25, September

Imageless Films: Maya

Imageless Films: Maya

Sunday 25, September

Monday 26, September

Pure Blood

Pure Blood

Monday 26, September

Bloody Flesh

Bloody Flesh

Monday 26, September

Tuesday 27, September

David Wharry: PGM 4

David Wharry: PGM 4

Tuesday 27, September

It All Started at the End

It All Started at the End

Tuesday 27, September

Imageless Films: David Wharry

Imageless Films: David Wharry

Tuesday 27, September

Wednesday 28, September

Kalt in Kolumbien

Kalt in Kolumbien

Wednesday 28, September

Movies for the Blind + Foyer

Movies for the Blind + Foyer

Wednesday 28, September

María Cano

María Cano

Wednesday 28, September

Thursday 29, September

It All Started at the End

It All Started at the End

Thursday 29, September

El Cafetal + Vera Cruz

El Cafetal + Vera Cruz

Thursday 29, September

Friday 30, September

Pure Blood

Pure Blood

Friday 30, September

EC: Ivan the Terrible: Parts 1 & 2

EC: Ivan the Terrible: Parts 1 & 2

Friday 30, September

Bloody Flesh

Bloody Flesh

Friday 30, September

(Projector) Performance

(Projector) Performance

This program brings together a selection of performative films that directly address the audience and/or the projectionist, some via text or recorded narration, others via live performance. The program includes very rare presentations of expanded cinema works by Malcolm Le Grice, Maurice Lemaître, and Bradley Eros. Morgan Fisher PROJECTION INSTRUCTIONS (1976, 4 min, 16mm. Restored print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.) “This film is a score to be performed by the projectionist, ordinarily a passive mechanic who interferes to the minimum with a film’s uneventful passage through his machine. The film consists only of a succession of written cards that are simultaneously read by a narrator. This text, written and spoken, is a set of instructions to the projectionist to manipulate the controls of his machine. […] Strictly speaking the audience is watching not the film, but the interaction between the film’s sound and image (the score) and the projectionist (the performer). The film is a performance piece in which the score is visible but the performer is not.” –Morgan Fisher “PROJECTION INSTRUCTIONS could not exist as anything other than a film and this sense it is superbly modernist.” –Beverly O’Neill Hollis Frampton A LECTURE (1968, ca. 30 min, audio-tape and projector performance) One of Hollis Frampton’s earliest analyses of the film medium (and perhaps his most entertaining) came in the form of a lecture/performance that he presented in 1968 at Hunter College. Prefiguring his film (nostalgia), Frampton pre-recorded the text of A LECTURE on audiotape, using the voice of filmmaker Michael Snow. The rest of the work was done by that unheralded cinematic performer, the 16mm film projector, with periodic assistance by the artist. David Wharry THE SCREEN (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 15) (2020, 4 min, digital) The actors: a projector, a screen, a voice, an audience and a cinema. The locations: “here” and “there.” The situation: an audience is sitting in the dark in a cinema. The film begins when the projector is switched on. Malcolm Le Grice PRE-PRODUCTION (1973, 15 min, performers, slide projection) Illuminated by two blank screens projected from empty slides, four performers read texts drawn from the history of cinema – a dictionary of cinema, the chemical production of film materials, and a fragment of a Hollywood narrative film script. The readings are treated as a musical quartet with a gradual superimposition of the four readings on each other. Maurice Lemaître TO SCREEN ON THE SKY, AT NIGHT… / A PROJETER SUR LE CIEL, LA NUIT… (1979, ca. 9 min, 16mm. Brand new 16mm print!) “The film you are about to see now will not be projected onto the sky, as Maurice Lemaître’s film, UN SOIR AU CINÉMA, was in part in the 1960s during a performance in the gardens of the American Center, Boulevard Raspail, because it is made of transparent film, from beginning to end. And the image is precisely the projection of all the dust, scratches and accidents of all kinds whose transparency is altered, like so many stars and galaxies of possible images.” –Maurice Lemaître David Wharry WISHFUL THINKING (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 3) (1978, 4 min, 16mm) In this chapter of David Wharry’s ongoing filmic series, “General Picture”, a narrator delivers instructions to the audience, enjoining each viewer to “project” their own imagery onto the screen. Bradley Eros RADICAL THOUGHT (2002/22, ca. 3 min, black leader) “Without giving away too much, I’ll just say that the ‘soundtrack’ is inside the mind of the viewer, as they experience the ‘film’. An experiment & a provocation.” –Bradley Eros Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Thursday 22, September

40,000 Years of Dreaming

40,000 Years of Dreaming

by George Miller 1997, 67 min, digital In this hour-long documentary, produced by the British Film Institute as part of its Century of Cinema series, Miller explores the tradition of film production in Australia, forging a link between the imported technology of filmmaking and the ancient Aboriginal creation myths. In parallel with tracing the making of modern Australia, he also explores his country’s wider media output via film and television. Miller includes extracts from films such as NED KELLY, SONS OF MATTHEW, CROCODILE DUNDEE, MY BRILLIANT CAREER, SWEETIE and THE CHANT OF JIMMIE BLACKSMITH, as well as his own MAD MAX trilogy.

Saturday 20, August

Thursday 25, August

Show Future Dates
A New Old Play

A New Old Play

(JIAO MA TANG HUI) U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! by Qiu Jiongjiong (China, 2021, 179 min, DCP. In Mandarin with English subtitles. Part of the dGenerate Collection at Icarus Films.) The first fictional feature by contemporary artist and filmmaker Qiu Jiongjiong, A NEW OLD PLAY is a magnificent achievement – profoundly personal, highly stylized, and thrillingly ambitious in its historical sweep and filmic scale. It’s an evocation of a lost world, and of a vanishing theatrical form – 20th-century Sichuan opera – whose conventions it lovingly and meticulously recreates via hand-crafted, patently artificial sets, props, and backdrops. Inspired by the story of Qiu’s own grandfather, A NEW OLD PLAY depicts the life (and afterlife) of Qiu Fu, a leading actor of Sichuan opera, over the course of many decades and numerous social and political upheavals. Calling to mind Wang Bing’s PLATFORM, but adopting a radically different style and sensibility, A NEW OLD PLAY is a visual feast and a film of great humor and disarming emotional power. “Older generations of performers have passed away, and life’s shocks and disruptions have hastened the decline of our Sichuan opera. A century on, I have tried to reconstruct the traditional grammar of the form, to simulate and revive its flavor and its melodies. The film is a slice of my own history and my family’s; but also a travelogue of minstrels wandering together through this world and the next. They are my immediate forebears, and this is my ‘pre-biography.’” –Qiu Jiongjiong “The scope – inspired by Qiu’s own theatrical family – is impressive, starting with the troupes’ creation during the chaotic period of the 1920s before passing through war with Japan, the nationalists’ struggles, war with the ascendant communists, a trip to Taiwan, and a gradual dissolution of the players before Mao’s secured reign. For such an expansive tale, Qiu shows himself both cagey and inventive: the film, which frames its history as a reflection by its aged leader on the cusp of being given a drink of forgetfulness and pulled down to hell by demons, is presented in high artifice, with charmingly theatrical sets representing non-theatrical spaces, clearly lit on sound stages, and frequently shot frontally, like dioramas. […] Qiu has made a cleverly contained existential epic, an ode to the innate persistence of workers, artists, and people in the face of futility and poor fortune. It is a wonder the film carries it off with an empathetic sparkle – there must be some purpose to art, to life, after all.” –Daniel Kasman, MUBI “I haven’t seen a more aesthetically (and historically) daring, brilliant independent feature from China in years.” –Shelly Kraicer

Thursday 1, September

Friday 2, September

Saturday 3, September

Sunday 4, September

Monday 5, September

Show Future Dates
Afterimage, Program 1

Afterimage, Program 1

This program gathers a selection of films that are not entirely imageless but that instead experiment with the use of brief flashes of imagery – single frames or clusters of frames, embedded within stretches of black or clear leader, or in some cases comprising the work as a whole – and that consequently explore the limits of perception and the phenomenon of the afterimage. Kurt Kren 42/83 NO FILM (1983, 3 sec, 16mm, silent) Robert Huot RED STOCKINGS (1967, 3 min, 16mm) Takahiko Iimura ONE FRAME DURATION (1977, 11 min, 16mm) Dean Snider HEY! (1981, 0.0417 seconds, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.) Stan Brakhage PASSAGE THROUGH: A RITUAL 1990, 49 min, 16mm “PASSAGE THROUGH: A RITUAL represents an unexpected partnership between Stan Brakhage and Fluxus composer Philip Corner. After seeing Brakhage’s THE RIDDLE OF LUMEN seventeen years after its completion, Corner composed a piece in tribute to the film and sent a tape to Brakhage, who in turn was inspired to set a film to the music. The result is one of Brakhage’s few films to be cut to a pre-existing soundtrack, and one of his most mysterious works.” –Ryan Marino & Ava Tews Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Saturday 10, September

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Afterimage, Program 2: Gammelion

Gregory Markopoulos GAMMELION 1968, 55 min, 16mm. Restored and preserved by the Austrian Film Museum. Special thanks to Robert Beavers. GAMMELION, Markopoulos’s elegant film of the castle of Roccasinibalda in Rieti, Italy (then owned by patron, publisher, and activist Caresse Crosby), employs an intricate system of fades to extend five minutes of footage to an hour of viewing time. This inventive new film form, in which brief images appear amongst measures of black and clear frames, was a crucial step towards Markopoulos’s monumental final work, ENIAIOS (1947-91).

Saturday 10, September

Wednesday 14, September

Show Future Dates
Babe

Babe

G

by Chris Noonan 1995, 92 min, 35mm. Co-written and -produced by George Miller. Though he ultimately chose not to direct the film, Miller co-wrote and -produced BABE, entrusting the direction to Chris Noonan, who had worked on two miniseries – THE COWRA BREAKOUT and VIETNAM – produced by Miller’s company Kennedy Miller Productions (now Kennedy Miller Mitchell). Miller had already proven himself a profoundly eclectic filmmaker, but BABE nevertheless came as a shock – a genuinely affecting family film that combines live-action and computer-generated animation to tell the story of an innocent, big-hearted piglet who wins the heart of its laconic owner, fellow farm animals, and neighbors by refusing to accept its preordained role and instead proving itself a gifted a sheep-herder. Without denying the strangeness of a career that swings from MAD MAX to BABE, the signs of Miller’s style and sensibility are not difficult to perceive, above all in the subordination of dialogue to visual storytelling and action (albeit of a different variety than usual). If BABE, with its reserved but ultimately rapturous quality of feeling, remains a radically different animal than the MAD MAX films, its 1998 sequel would achieve the seemingly impossible feat of combining the two dimensions of Miller’s work into an incongruously perfect whole.

Sunday 21, August

Saturday 27, August

Show Future Dates
Babe: Pig in the City

Babe: Pig in the City

by George Miller 1998, 97 min, 35mm “The success of BABE was unprecedented, not unlike its own central underdog character, but the audiences that flocked to the charming original couldn’t seem to take George Miller’s brilliant, twisted sequel. Drunk on more than a little of the then-brewing pre-millennium tension, 1998’s BABE: PIG IN THE CITY carries its predecessor’s torch into darker, quixotic territories, bursting at the seams with folkloric witticism and hellzapoppin’ imagery. Babe the sheep-herding pig must conquer the slings and arrows of the titular everycity (complete with the Statue of Liberty, the Hollywood sign, and the Sydney Opera House) when the bank threatens to take away his beloved farm, located as it is, ‘just a little to the left of the 20th century.’ Singing mice and a noble, quotable duck are the most memorable of the film’s Homeric cast of outcast animals, and throughout their alternately delightful and frightful adventures, there’s no shortage of insight into life’s hardships and joys.” –Rob Humanick, SLANT “Mr. Ed meets glorified Barnum & Bailey? Think rather Max Ernst and the surrealists and THE CAMERAMAN’S REVENGE. Sorry MAD MAX fans, but it’s George Miller’s masterpiece…” –Pat Graham, CHICAGO READER

Sunday 21, August

Thursday 25, August

Saturday 27, August

Show Future Dates
Bloody Flesh

Bloody Flesh

by Carlos Mayolo In Spanish with English subtitles, 1983, 86 min, 35mm-to-DCP “An extremely interesting film about La Violencia in Colombia which captures the strange social and political heterogeneity of this dark set of events. Mayolo developed his own aesthetic – partly in collaboration with filmmaker Luis Ospina and the late Andrés Caicedo – ‘el gótico tropical’ in order to convey this strangeness. The film combines local Colombian myths – caspi, la madremonte, el hojarasquin del monte – with themes of vampirism and incest to convey the place of La Violencia within a repetitive and cyclical history characterized by interpartisan conflicts that benefit the empowerment of the Colombian aristocracy. Opening with a series of cross-cuts showing, alternately, a dying grandmother, and a group of grave-robbbers in the countryside of the Cauca region, the film (as suggested by these images) delves deep into the ‘other scene’ of political life and into the dark quasi-supernatural forces driving it. Whether Mayolo’s ‘tropical Gothic’ works is another matter, and whether it is Gothic or indeed baroque is a question that the spectator might wish to ask him/herself.” –Rory O’Bryen

Saturday 24, September

Monday 26, September

Friday 30, September

Show Future Dates
Children of the Moon

Children of the Moon

Curated by Anto Astudillo & Lupe Campos “Children of the Moon” is a program of selected work by Queer/Trans POC artists from Latin America and Latin-American descent. The film screening showcases a variety of forms including experimental, diary, essay-film, narrative, and documentary approaches. As a form of redefining by undefining, “Children of the Moon” explores the organic nature of gender, identity and spirituality within the collective queer voice as a unified community – an experience rendered vulnerable to a heteronormative universe that sacrifices QTPOC bodies as a consequence of their manifestation. The program will include work by Yasha Leloneck, Damián Sainz-Edwards, Comunidad Catrileo-Carrión, Jota Mombaça, Andrea Reyes, Colectivo Los Ingrávidos, and more. Full details TBA. Total running time: ca. 90 min.

Thursday 18, August

David Wharry: PGM 1

David Wharry: PGM 1

Featuring the first 10 episodes of “General Picture”, this program demonstrates the dizzying variety of techniques Wharry adopts in deconstructing cinematic tropes: everything from presenting the subtitles for a “missing” film (À PLATE COUTURE), calling attention to the projector itself (FOR EYES ONLY), and imitating the gestures and costuming of silent melodrama (SUDDENLY ONCE MORE), to directly addressing the audience in a quasi-hypnotic manner (WISHFUL THINKING and PHAETON). FREIGHTERS OF DESTINY (General Picture – Episode 1) (1980, 3 min, 16mm) À PLATE COUTURE (General Picture – Episode 2) (1979, 4.5 min, 16mm, silent) WISHFUL THINKING (General Picture – Episode 3) (1978, 4 min, 16mm) FOR EYES ONLY (General Picture – Episode 4) (1978, 3 min, 16mm, silent) PHAETON (General Picture – Episode 5) (1978, 7.5 min, 16mm) SUDDENLY ONCE MORE (General Picture – Episode 6) (1980, 3 min, 16mm-to-DCP, silent) ENTR’ACTE / INTERLUDE (General Picture – Episode 7) (1980, 4 min, 16mm) EUROPEAN CRISIS (General Picture – Episode 8) (1982, 15.5 min, 16mm, silent) A TOUCH OF VENUS (General Picture – Episode 9) (1980, 8 min, 16mm) BODY AND SOUL (General Picture – Episode 10) (1981, 6 min, 16mm, silent) Total running time: ca. 65 min.

Saturday 24, September

David Wharry: PGM 2

David Wharry: PGM 2

EL CAFETAL (General Picture – Episode 11) 1981, 38 min, 16mm-to-DCP “A musical comedy – rare in experimental film to say the least! Musical comedies often conjure visions in CinemaScope in vivid colors and a story borne along by the music. EL CAFETAL has all these ingredients but with a fundamental difference: the film’s characters are heard but not seen. The viewer is faced with a series of colors in which the sole representation is… their color. It is up to the audience to imagine, to conjure their own image of the drama and its protagonists. So this is definitely a ‘hijacking’ of classical cinematography in as much as it is paralyzed by the idea that there could be no image. Here, it is that absence that is the departure point of an imaginary film to be ‘enacted’ by the audience. The filmmaker merely chooses the colors to express the content of each scene – jealousy, love, hate, passion – in order to activate that dream.” –Yann Beauvais WRITTEN ON THE WIND (General Picture – Episode 12) 1983, 40 min, 16mm-to-DCP What do you remember about a film when you haven’t seen it for 10 years? James McCourt’s memory is prodigious. In an office in the Rockefeller Center in Manhattan, the American writer recounts his favorite film, Douglas Sirk’s 1956 melodrama WRITTEN ON THE WIND, scene by scene, sometimes almost shot by shot. “Melodrama meets structural film.” –Deke Dusinberre Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Saturday 24, September

David Wharry: PGM 3: Point Blank

David Wharry: PGM 3: Point Blank

POINT BLANK (General Picture – Episode 14) 2018, 91 min, DCP A shot-by-shot description – via title cards – of John Boorman’s neo-noir film (1967), starring Lee Marvin and co-starring Angie Dickinson, Keenan Wynn and Carroll O’Connor.

Sunday 25, September

David Wharry: PGM 4

David Wharry: PGM 4

This program features the most recent episodes of “General Picture”, made (like Episode 14, POINT BLANK) following Wharry’s 25-year break from filmmaking. The program is supplemented by DAWN PATROL, the only film of Wharry’s in distribution that is not part of the “General Picture” series. THE SCREEN (General Picture – Episode 15) (2020, 4 min, digital) CARLTON DEKKER (General Picture – Episode 13) (1986, 7 min, 16mm) DREAM (General Picture – Episode 16) (2020, 9.5 min, digital) THE PLAIN OF KÔR (General Picture – Episode 18) (2022, 3.5 min, digital, silent) THE TAJ MAHAL (General Picture – Episode 17) (2021, 9.5 min, digital) Preceded by: DAWN PATROL (1978, 13 min, 16mm, silent) Total running time: ca. 50 min.

Tuesday 27, September

Dirty Dancing

Dirty Dancing

by Am Schmidt 2015-19, 100 min, digital SPECIAL SCREENING! FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Artist Am Schmidt has developed a practice over the past decade that addresses the anxiety inherent in constructing and performing an identity, revealing slippages of self by re-contextualization and intervention. She has, for example, curated a group sculpture show in a McDonald’s with the owner’s permission; executed a landscape painting series à la Hudson River School as a Bard Film/Video student, with plans for her art historian mother to curate an exhibition; and worn Abercrombie & Fitch graphic shirts and cologne, with otherwise off-brand apparel, for one year. Schmidt’s DIRTY DANCING (2015-19), is a shot-for-shot remake of Emile Ardolino’s Jennifer Grey- and Patrick Swayze-starring 1987 film. Matching the runtime of the original, the remake features Schmidt herself as the female lead, “Baby” – but all the other characters, and the music, are absent. The result is both a striking formal experiment suffused with a haunting sense of emptiness, and a sharp socio-cultural critique that subtly but unmistakably reveals how rarely Baby speaks (which in turn sheds light on how few lines female leads are typically granted). While the original delivers a class morality tale, Schmidt’s remake presents a story of a woman who is always being told what to do. In Baby’s solitary ghost world, humor and sadness go hand in hand. Through playing the role, Schmidt subjects herself to a self-silencing that, paired with the obsessive devotion required to make the movie, speaks with an uncanny loudness. As Schmidt is not a formally trained dancer, actor, or filmmaker, the entire project also raises notions of mastery. The movie shows Schmidt executing Baby’s every move (and line) with an accuracy and a lack of expertise that makes us question the practice of mimicry. (To prepare for shooting, Schmidt took dance classes for months.) Why go to such lengths, only to fall so short of the original? Strangely, Schmidt’s DIRTY DANCING evokes something new entirely. By preserving Baby’s role and stripping all else away, Schmidt deftly reveals and counters the pervasive gender imbalance in cinema. “The project in its entirety is about acting and not acting, presence and absence, rehearsal and performance. This is not an homage to the original DIRTY DANCING so much as a utilization of a pop culture artifact to depict a striving-for (and for what purpose?). The movie will be laden with emptiness that I hope will lend both elegance and humor, and will isolate notions of impersonation, expectation, and the inescapable self.” –Am Schmidt

Friday 16, September

Duffer

Duffer

by Joseph Despins & William Dumaresq 1971, 72 min, 16mm-to-digital Duffer is a handsome lad torn between two lovers: a tender sex worker called Your Gracie, who squeezes Duffer in between her regular punters; and Louis Jack, a deranged older man who loves heavy torture, anal sex, and misogyny. Duffer struggles to make sense of his willingness to submit to Louis Jack’s increasingly fucked-up sadism, but when his master suggests the two men start a family – the old-fashioned way – things get really twisted. Directed by Joseph Despins and William Dumaresq from a story by Dumaresq (who also plays Louis Jack) and featuring a score from famed HAIR composer Galt MacDermot, DUFFER is a jaw-dropping combination of British kitchen-sink realism, psychological horror, and experimental fever dream that’s earned critical comparisons to the early films of David Lynch. Stephanie Bailey offered a counterpoint in her review for ARTFORUM, writing “all sensationalism aside, this is a tender rumination on pleasure – seeking it, feeling it, and giving it – a story that charts the intense stirrings for something one doesn’t quite know or understand.”

Thursday 8, September

EC: A King in New York

EC: A King in New York

by Charles Chaplin 1957, 110 min, 35mm Forced out of the U.S. in 1952, Chaplin lashed back with this scathing satire of everything American – from McCarthyist witch hunts to CinemaScope and rock and roll – as he played his last full role, as a deposed and impoverished monarch seeking refuge in Manhattan (though the film was shot in the United Kingdom).

Friday 19, August

Saturday 20, August

Sunday 21, August

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EC: Arsenal

EC: Arsenal

by Alexandr Dovzhenko (1928-29, 87 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) “An epic canvas covering Ukrainian history from WWI to the Russian Civil War, as experienced in Kiev, and culminating in fighting around the arsenal in the heart of the city. Dovzhenko essentially uses a static camera, but with much use of montage and cross-cutting. […] Where Dovzhenko is clearly distinctive, however, is his placing of human events against the majestic backdrop of nature, in particular the sky. Man and nature are one, as a dying Bolshevik asks his comrades to transport and bury him in his native soil.” –David C. Gillespie, EARLY SOVIET CINEMA: INNOVATION, IDEOLOGY AND PROPAGANDA

Sunday 18, September

EC: Battleship Potemkin

EC: Battleship Potemkin

(BRONENOSETS POTEMKIN) by Sergei Eisenstein (1925, 74 min, 35mm, silent. With English intertitles.) “POTEMKIN used [Eisenstein’s] new set of rules to create what has been called the most perfect and concise example of film structure. Like STRIKE, [POTEMKIN] has no hero, only the masses, and no plot, only an incident plucked from the pre-history of the Revolution.” –Standish Lawder, EISENSTEIN AND CONSTRUCTIVISM “POTEMKIN was the first work to embody, in their most tangible form, various principles of construction peculiar to the medium: montage (or editing) and parallel action (the expansion of time through spatial manipulation); or, in sum, the purely formal deployment of objective action to create psychological dimensions. Eisenstein was not the first ‘film artist,’ but he was the first to be so pure, the first to use photography like painting in movement, photography like verbal imagery. As set down in his writings, his own theories inform us of this. Yet POTEMKIN must be seen to be believed.” –Parker Tyler

Tuesday 20, September

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

(LA BELLE ET LA BÊTE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Jean Cocteau’s first full-length movie is perhaps the most sensuously elegant of all filmed fairy tales. As a child escapes from everyday daily life to the magic of a storybook, so, in the film, Beauty’s farm, with its Vermeer simplicity, fades in intensity as we are caught up in the Gustave Doré extravagance of the Beast’s enchanted landscape. In Christian Bérard’s makeup, Jean Marais is a magnificent Beast.” –Pauline Kael

Friday 26, August

Saturday 27, August

Wednesday 31, August

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EC: Cavalcanti / Crockwell

EC: Cavalcanti / Crockwell

by Alberto Cavalcanti RIEN QUE LES HEURES / NOTHING BUT THE HOURS (1926, 52 min, 35mm) One of the very first “city symphonies,” this film interweaves documentary, experimental, and narrative elements that together provide vivid images of Paris in the mid-1920s. The Brazilian-born Cavalcanti was at the time a central figure of the French avant-garde, but his fascinating career would later find him making pioneering documentaries for John Grierson’s GPO Film Unit in the UK in the 1930s, dramas, noirs, and musicals for Ealing Studios throughout the 1940s, and finally a wide array of films in Brazil, East Germany, France, and Israel in the years before his death in 1982. by Douglass Crockwell GLENS FALLS SEQUENCE (1946, 8 min, 16mm) THE LONG BODIES (1947, 6 min, 16mm) Both films preserved by Anthology Film Archives. “The basic idea was to paint continuing pictures on various layers with plastic paint, adding at times and removing at times, and to a certain extent these early attempts were successful.” –Douglass Crockwell Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Tuesday 6, September

EC: Conner / Conrad

EC: Conner / Conrad

by Bruce Conner A MOVIE (1958, 12 min, 16mm) COSMIC RAY (1961, 4 min, 16mm) REPORT (1965, 13 min, 16mm) “Conner stands as a kind of twentieth century Pieter Bruegel. For like the great Flemish master he distorts the visible world in order to penetrate a reality of being rather than appearances; his vision is cosmic in breadth; he deals with some of the most provocative issues, both artistic and otherwise, of his time; and finally, with an evocative ambiguity and painful irony he touches something which we sometimes call the human experience.” –Carl I. Belz, FILM CULTURE COSMIC RAY and REPORT have been preserved by Anthology through the National Film Preservation Foundation’s Avant-Garde Masters Grant program, funded by The Film Foundation. by Tony Conrad THE FLICKER (1966, 30 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology with funding provided by the National Film Preservation Foundation.) “THE FLICKER is a tremendous harnessing of the raw power, the elemental material of the cinematic medium – light itself – to transport the spectator slowly at first, hardly perceptibly, then accelerating, through a non-objective non-abstract world of sheer energy. Time becomes the compelling pulse of white into black and back, space becomes the unbounded expansion and contraction of force; the screen becomes a new sun, the audience its creatures.” –Ken Kelman Total running time: ca. 65 min.

Tuesday 6, September

EC: Day of Wrath

EC: Day of Wrath

(VREDENS DAG) by Carl Th. Dreyer (1943, 100 min, 35mm. In Danish with English subtitles.) “Carl Dreyer’s art begins to unfold at the point where most other directors give up. Witchcraft and martyrdom are his themes – but his witches don’t ride broomsticks, they ride the erotic fears of their persecutors. It is a world that suggests a dreadful fusion of Hawthorne and Kafka.” –Pauline Kael

Friday 9, September

Saturday 10, September

Sunday 11, September

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EC: Earth / Zemlya

EC: Earth / Zemlya

by Alexandr Dovzhenko (1929-30, 82 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) A poetic expression of love for both nature and Ukrainian culture by the man who was alternatively branded a deserter by Ukrainians and a Ukrainian nationalist by Russian Soviets. Dovzhenko champions the progression of life, class struggle, and new attitudes for a town changed by a tractor and a fallen hero.

Sunday 18, September

EC: Gertrud

EC: Gertrud

by Carl Th. Dreyer (1964, 119 min, 16mm. In Danish with English subtitles.) “GERTRUD is as towering a master work in the narrative sound cinema as Brakhage’s THE ART OF VISION is in the nonnarrative cinema. Every detail, every motion, every word in GERTRUD has its right place, its own voice, and contributes to the whole and is beautiful. […] Every generation states its own position on love. GERTRUD is Dreyer’s statement on love, and it is pure, radiant, and perfect, like a ring.” –Jonas Mekas, MOVIE JOURNAL

Monday 12, September

EC: Gold Rush

EC: Gold Rush

by Charles Chaplin One of the most celebrated and beloved of all silent films, THE GOLD RUSH features Chaplin’s most distinctive alter-ego, the Little Tramp, as he wins fortune and love in the Yukon. Filled with impressive sight gags and heartrending pathos, the film deserves its reputation as one of the touchstones of modern comedy. This version features Chaplin’s own music and poetic narration, added for the 1942 reissue.

Saturday 20, August

EC: Ivan the Terrible: Parts 1 & 2

EC: Ivan the Terrible: Parts 1 & 2

(IVAN GROZNY) by Sergei Eisenstein (1942-46, 194 min, 35mm. In Russian with no subtitles; English synopsis available.) “The first time in history a man has committed suicide by cinema,” quipped Dovzhenko. A state-sanctioned production, Ivan’s opulent furs and jewels color the black-and-white machinations by a demonic Czar bent on making his subjects’ lives a living hell – a statement pointed with outrage directly at Stalin.

Friday 30, September

EC: Joseph Cornell

EC: Joseph Cornell

Unless otherwise noted, all the films in this program are silent. With the exception of GNIR REDNOW, all films have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives. ROSE HOBART (ca. 1936, 20 min, 16mm, sound) CENTURIES OF JUNE (1955, 10 min, 16mm. Photographed by Stan Brakhage.) THE AVIARY (1954, 11 min, 16mm. Photographed by Rudy Burckhardt.) GNIR REDNOW (1955, 5 min, 16mm. Photographed by Stan Brakhage.) NYMPHLIGHT (1957, 8 min, 16mm. Photographed by Rudy Burckhardt.) A LEGEND FOR FOUNTAINS (1957/65, 17 min, 16mm. Photographed by Rudy Burckhardt; completed by Lawrence Jordan.) ANGEL (1957, 3 min, 16mm. Photographed by Rudy Burckhardt.) “[ROSE HOBART] is a breathtaking example of the potential for surrealistic imagery within a conventional Hollywood film once it is liberated from its narrative causality. […] In Cornell’s later films – both those photographed by Rudy Burckhardt, Stan Brakhage, and Larry Jordan and the collage films which Jordan completed – Joseph Cornell describes the marginal area where the conscious and the unconscious meet. These are films which affirm a sustained present moment in which a quality of reminiscence is implicated.” –P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Monday 5, September

EC: Maya Deren

EC: Maya Deren

MESHES OF THE AFTERNOON (1943, 14 min, 16mm. Co-directed by Alexander Hammid. Music by Teiji Ito from 1959.) AT LAND (1944, 15 min, 16mm, silent. Photographed by Hella Heyman and Alexander Hammid.) A STUDY IN CHOREOGRAPHY FOR CAMERA (1945, 3 min, 16mm, silent. By Maya Deren and Talley Beatty.) RITUAL IN TRANSFIGURED TIME (1946, 15 min, 16mm, silent. Choreographic collaboration with Frank Westbrook. Photographed by Hella Heyman. With Rita Christiani and Frank Westbrook.) “MESHES is, one might say, almost expressionist; it externalizes an inner world to the point where it is confounded with the external one. AT LAND has little to do with the inner world of the protagonist, it externalizes the hidden dynamics of the external world, and here the drama results from the activity of the external world. It is as if I had moved from a concern with the life of a fish, to a concern with the sea which accounts for the character of the fish and its life. And RITUAL pulls back even further, to a point of view from which the external world itself is but an element in an entire structure and scheme of metamorphosis: the sea itself changes because of the larger changes of the earth. RITUAL is about the nature and process of change.” –Maya Deren Total running time: ca. 55 min.

Wednesday 7, September

EC: Michael

EC: Michael

by Carl Th. Dreyer (1924, 89 min, 16mm, silent. With German intertitles; English synopsis available.) Shot by the great German cinematographers Karl Freund and Rudolph Maté, MICHAEL concerns the unconsummated love between a painter and his manipulative, larcenous model. The Danish director Benjamin Christensen stars as artist Claude Zoret, modeled in part after Rodin, whose irrepressible love finds its most complete expression in his last painting.

Thursday 8, September

EC: October

EC: October

(OKTYABR ) by Sergei Eisenstein (1928, 143 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) “An imaginary document projected on actual locations, OCTOBER is the Soviet equivalent of the Sistine Chapel – an artist commissioned by the state has represented the sacred origins of the universe. Woodrow Wilson had famously hailed D.W. Griffith’s THE BIRTH OF A NATION (1915) as ‘history written with lightning,’ but Eisenstein’s cosmic newsreel cum theoretical film poem goes beyond THE BIRTH OF A NATION, as well as his own BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN, in drafting the past to serve the requirements of the present. No less than the revolutionaries who made October, Eisenstein understood himself as history’s tool. Thus consecrated to the Bolshevik faith, his OCTOBER is a perfect tautology – it clarifies and improves on history in the service of objective historical necessity.” –J. Hoberman, THE RED ATLANTIS: COMMUNIST CULTURE IN THE ABSENCE OF COMMUNISM

Thursday 22, September

EC: Old and New

EC: Old and New

(STAROYE I NOVOYE) by Sergei Eisenstein (1929, 120 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) With OLD AND NEW, also known as THE GENERAL LINE, Eisenstein developed and perfected his theories of “mise-en-cadre,” using the montage of characters in the foreground and background to conjure meanings, and “overtonal montage,” bringing silent film to its zenith.

Friday 23, September

EC: Ordet

EC: Ordet

by Carl Th. Dreyer (1955, 132 min, 35mm. In Danish with no subtitles; English synopsis available.) A farmer’s family is torn apart by faith, sanctity, and love – one child believes he’s Jesus Christ, a second proclaims himself agnostic, and the third falls in love with a fundamentalist’s daughter. Layering multiple stories of faith and rebellion, Dreyer’s adaptation of Kaj Munk’s play is a meditation on faith and fanaticism.

Sunday 11, September

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

(ORPHÉE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Orpheus could only exist on the screen. A drama of the visible and the invisible, ORPHEUS’s Death is like a spy who falls in love with the person being spied upon. The myth of immortality.” –Jean Cocteau

Saturday 27, August

Sunday 28, August

Wednesday 31, August

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EC: Short Films by Charlie Chaplin, Program 2

EC: Short Films by Charlie Chaplin, Program 2

“It is stupid to treat Charlie as a clown of genius. If there had never been a cinema he would undoubtedly have been a clown of genius, but the cinema has allowed him to raise the comedy of circus and music hall to the highest aesthetic level. Chaplin needed the medium of the cinema to free comedy completely from the limits of space and time imposed by the stage or the circus arena. […] [The] best Chaplin films can be seen over and over again with no loss of pleasure – indeed the very opposite is the case. It is doubtless a fact that the satisfaction derived from certain gags is inexhaustible, so deep does it lie, but it is furthermore supremely true that comic form and aesthetic value owe nothing to surprise. The latter is exhausted the first time around and is replaced by a much more subtle pleasure, namely the delight of anticipating and recognizing perfection.” –André Bazin, WHAT IS CINEMA A DAY’S PLEASURE (1919, 19 min, 35mm, silent) THE IDLE CLASS (1921, 32 min, 35mm, silent) PAY DAY (1922, 22 min, 35mm, silent) Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Sunday 21, August

EC: Strike

EC: Strike

(STACHKA) by Sergei Eisenstein (1925, 106 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) Eisenstein’s interest in the Freudian father complex drives this psychological scenario in which non-actors step forward to acknowledge the viewer, illustrating Eisenstein’s desire to penetrate to the heart of cinema, sidestepping realism by ‘being real.’ Governmental restrictions made STRIKE the only completed film of a series intended to portray the road to revolution.

Monday 19, September

EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

(LE SANG D’UN POÈTE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Adolescent angels wandering about, black boxers with perfect bodies taking flight, school-children in capes killing each other with snowballs, a mirror becomes a swimming pool, and the hallways of a furnished hotel turn into a labyrinth.” –Georges Sadoul

Friday 26, August

Sunday 28, August

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EC: The Parson's Widow

EC: The Parson's Widow

(PRÄSTÄNKAN) by Carl Th. Dreyer (1921, 78 min, 35mm, silent. With Danish intertitles; English synopsis available.) In this lyrical, early Dreyer comedy, a young parson wins a plum parish in 17th-century Norway, but is obliged to marry the widow of his deceased predecessor and pretend his attractive young fiancée is his sister. Dreyer’s touch is evident in the close-ups of the pastor’s would-be rivals and parishioners, and in a slow pan presaging the 360-degree views of VAMPYR.

Wednesday 7, September

EC: The Passion of Joan of Arc

EC: The Passion of Joan of Arc

(LA PASSION DE JEANNE D’ARC) by Carl Th. Dreyer (1927-28, 98 min, 35mm, silent. With Danish intertitles; English synopsis available.) Spiritual rapture and institutional hypocrisy are brought to stark, vivid life in one of the most transcendent achievements of the silent era. Chronicling the trial of Joan of Arc in the final hours leading up to her execution, Dreyer depicts her torment with startling immediacy, employing an array of techniques – including expressionistic lighting, interconnected sets, and painfully intimate close-ups – to immerse viewers in her subjective experience. Anchoring Dreyer’s audacious formal experimentation is a legendary performance by Renée Falconetti, whose haunted face channels both the agony and the ecstasy of martyrdom. “With THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, there occurs a most striking change in both the film-maker’s style and his intensity of thematic concentration. A few potent shots in previous movies hardly promise the unique and brilliant imagery which here bursts forth frame after frame. […] The vision of JOAN is inspired or demoniac. Her passion is observed with clinical detail in the sharp-etched, stark compositions, many relentless close-ups. But this is also loving detail, for Joan is the first of Dreyer’s possessed, a lineage which may be traced through the victims of VAMPYR to Anne in DAY OF WRATH and Johannes in ORDET; characters who work out their passions throughout the process of their films with peculiar intensity and directness, so that identification with the director himself is implicit.” –Ken Kelman, FILM CULTURE

Friday 9, September

EC: Vampyr

EC: Vampyr

by Carl Th. Dreyer (1931-32, 70 min, 35mm. In Danish with no subtitles; English synopsis available.) “Imagine that we are sitting in a very ordinary room. Suddenly we are told that there is a corpse behind the door. Instantly, the room we are sitting in has taken on another look. The light, the atmosphere have changed, though they are physically the same. This is because we have changed and the objects are as we conceive them. This is the effect I wanted to produce in VAMPYR.” –Carl Th. Dreyer

Saturday 10, September

EC: Zvenigora

EC: Zvenigora

by Alexandr Dovzhenko (1928, 96 min, 35mm, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available.) Dovzhenko’s second film, attacked by Soviet critics for being so beautifully rendered as to actually lessen its political impact, remains today a “cinematic poem” as the director named it. Episodic, folkloric, and allegorical, it is a mythic search for hidden treasure by two brothers. Dovzhenko wrote: “I did not so much make the picture as sing it out like a songbird.”

Wednesday 14, September

El Cafetal + Vera Cruz

El Cafetal + Vera Cruz

David Wharry EL CAFETAL (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 11) 1981, 38 min, 16mm-to-DCP “A musical comedy – rare in experimental film to say the least! Musical comedies often conjure visions in CinemaScope in vivid colors and a story borne along by the music. EL CAFETAL has all these ingredients but with a fundamental difference: the film’s characters are heard but not seen. The viewer is faced with a series of colors in which the sole representation is… their color. It is up to the audience to imagine, to conjure their own image of the drama and its protagonists. So this is definitely a ‘hijacking’ of classical cinematography in as much as it is paralyzed by the idea that there could be no image. Here, it is that absence that is the departure point of an imaginary film to be ‘enacted’ by the audience. The filmmaker merely chooses the colors to express the content of each scene – jealousy, love, hate, passion – in order to activate that dream.” –Yann Beauvais & Rosângela Rennó VERA CRUZ 2000, 44 min, digital VERA CRUZ is an experimental project founded on the idea of the “impossibility” of a documentary on the discovery of Brazil. Based on the contents of the famous letter by Pero Vaz de Caminha, this is the video version of an “(im)possible film” that oscillates back and forth between documentary and fiction. From the subtracted image, we see only the “film picture,” old, scratched, worn out by five hundred years of existence and overuse. The sound of the words has also been removed, seeing as the dialogue between conquistador and native, strictly speaking, did not take place. All that is left is the sound of the ocean and the wind, witnesses to the events. The account that remains takes the shape of subtitle-text. Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Thursday 29, September

Ghost Artist

Ghost Artist

by Steven Palmer & Edward Riche 2019, 67 min, DCP NYC PREMIERE! FILMMAKER STEVEN PALMER IN PERSON! In 2019, as part of a World’s Fair-themed film series, Anthology presented screenings of an extraordinary work entitled MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE, a pioneering, taboo-busting medical film that was produced for and exhibited at Expo 67 in Montreal. A revolutionary film about the techno-medicalized body that made over 20,000 people faint during its presentation at the World’s Fair, MIRACLES featured the first uncensored color footage of hospital birth to be seen by a mass public, striking sequences of brain and open-heart surgery, and bizarre prostheses for child thalidomide victims. The availability of the film was thanks in large part to the efforts of writer and medical historian Steven Palmer, who had recently rediscovered it in the vaults of the Library and Archives Canada. Palmer helped restore it and traced its creation to Belgian theater artist, poet, and filmmaker Robert Cordier, who made the film in collaboration with cinematographer John Palmer (renowned in underground film circles for first broaching the idea that resulted in Warhol’s EMPIRE and for shooting, co-directing, and co-writing the 1972 Edie Sedgwick vehicle, CIAO MANHATTAN). Though little-known, especially on this side of the Atlantic, Cordier is remarkable both for his own achievements and for his status as an artist who has played an unsung but significant role in many of the most important creative movements of the 20th century. Working variously in Paris, New York, London, and elsewhere, Cordier encountered or collaborated with an astounding variety of cultural figures during his career, including James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Andy Warhol, Allen Ginsberg, the Free Southern Theater, and Salvador Dalí, among others. Dazzled by Cordier, and determined to wrest him from the shadows and reveal his place at the crossroads of so many different artistic realms, Palmer and his collaborator, screenwriter Edward Riche (RARE BIRDS), felt compelled to make a documentary portrait. The result, GHOST ARTIST, is a chronicle of both the strange and nearly lost story of MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE and of the life and history of Cordier, who, at 82 and still active in the Paris theater, shares stories of his dizzyingly varied creative projects and relationships with great energy, humor, and aplomb. Preceded by: Robert Cordier MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE (1967, 19 min, 35mm-to-DCP. Produced by Vision Now for the Canadian Corporation for the World Exhibition’s Man and His Health Pavilion at Expo 67, Montreal. Courtesy of Library and Archives Canada.) The screenings will be introduced by co-director Steven Palmer, Professor of History at the University of Windsor. Please note: In its first iteration, created by Robert Cordier for the 1967 Montreal World’s Fair (Expo 67), MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE took the form of a combined film and theater piece. That initial production featured experimentally-tinged dialogue, which took place between actors on stage and actors on film. During the course of the event’s run, Expo managers tamed the show by redoing the film’s audio in a more conventionally didactic, documentary style. Steven Palmer, Library and Archives Canada film conservator Paul Gordon, and film editor Nick Hector have now restored Cordier’s original soundtrack, which includes performances by Cordier and his troupe, wild sound, and a nuanced audio mix that were largely suppressed in the second version of the film. That second version remains valuable, however, as the only record of the full script of the original stage and screen production. In conjunction with the presentation of GHOST ARTIST, Anthology is pleased to present the world premiere of the restoration of Cordier’s original version of MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE. The two versions will screen on alternate nights preceding Palmer and Riche’s documentary, but we will also present a program, on Saturday and Sunday, Sept 3 & 4 at 6:00 each day, that will provide an opportunity to see them back-to-back

Thursday 1, September

Friday 2, September

Saturday 3, September

Sunday 4, September

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Happy Feet

Happy Feet

PGfor some mild peril and rude humor

“George Miller’s jubilant, eccentric film makes its CGI penguins vibrant, expressive, even cosmic. Miller’s style is as dynamic in cartoon form as in the live-action netherworlds of THE ROAD WARRIOR or BABE: PIG AND THE CITY: A reverse crane shot from a hatching egg to Antarctic vistas locates the tuneful penguin community into which the hero, Mumble (voiced by Elijah Wood), is born an outsider, a dissonant voice, literally. Unable to warble, Mumble instead lets his feet do the singing, and, since the critter’s tap-dancing has been modeled on the scintillating Savion Glover, the movements communicate joy, a sense of identity, and revolt (what one of the elders brands a dangerous call for ‘uprising’). Huge ships slicing through the ice or the hero emerging into a zombified zoo cage are remarkable visions, all fueled by Miller’s feel for the oddness of the world and its many dwellers (including leopard seals, killer whales and sea elephants – humans are the ‘aliens’); usually dull contractual obligations in animation, the songs here (from Prince’s ‘Kiss’ to ‘Leader of the Pack’ murmured by Robin William’s Latino-accented ‘amigo’) are pop eruptions that tap straight into the characters’ (and the planet’s) metaphysical crises.” –Fernando F. Croce, CINEPASSION “I think every film I make, I really believe every film I make is experimental. I mean the film we’re making right now [HAPPY FEET] is experimental. No one’s ever made anything like this before.” –George Miller, AUSTRALIAN SCREEN interview

Monday 22, August

Monday 29, August

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Happy Feet 2

Happy Feet 2

PGfor some rude humor and mild peril

“This e-pluribus-unum ethic, of individual eccentricities that help stoke communal elation, serves as both the theme of HAPPY FEET TWO and the key to its 97 minutes of nonstop joy. […] More than any other major filmmaker, Miller has devoted his career to franchises. Of the eight features this former ER-room physician has directed, six are episodes in the MAD MAX, BABE and HAPPY FEET series. Max, Babe and Mumbles might not seem natural siblings, but consider: the post-apocalyptic road warrior, the pig that believes it’s a sheep and the penguin with rebellious notions of showmanship are all outsiders bucking conventional wisdom at the risk of their lives or their standing in the community. ‘There’s no difference,’ the director insisted in 2007, ‘between HAPPY FEET, BABE and MAD MAX.’” –Richard Corliss, TIME

Tuesday 23, August

Tuesday 30, August

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Imageless Films: David Wharry

Imageless Films: David Wharry

This program showcases three films by filmmaker David Wharry, who was born and raised in the UK but has worked since 1972 in France, where he was an early member of the Coopérative des Cinéastes (an organization that was short-lived but helped lead to the formation of Light Cone, the preeminent distributor of avant-garde cinema in France). Identifying almost the entirety of his body of work as a part of his ongoing “General Picture” series, Wharry’s films playfully but rigorously deconstruct the codes and conventions of narrative cinema in a wide variety of ways. The three films presented in this program do so by jettisoning the image, leaving only the intertitles for an imaginary film (À PLATE COUTURE), the music that appears between theatrical acts (ENTR’ACTE / INTERLUDE), or the descriptive captions for a feature-length commercial movie (POINT BLANK). Alongside “Imageless Films”, we will be presenting a separate presentation of the entirety of Wharry’s “General Picture” series; click here for more details. David Wharry À PLATE COUTURE (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 2) (1979, 4.5 min, 16mm, silent) “Wharry parodies the elements of a dark criminal story that could pass for one of the jewels of station kiosk literature. […] The plot, complicated to perfection, appears as the synopsis of an imaginary film that we would have to (re)constitute since we only have the main lines. Playing with the codes of classic cinema, Wharry challenges us to mentally produce a film and more precisely [an] adaptation of the scenario he gives us.” –Yann Beauvais, “mot: dites, image”, Scratch, Paris, 1988 David Wharry ENTR’ACTE / INTERLUDE (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 7) (1980, 4 min, 16mm) David Wharry POINT BLANK (GENERAL PICTURE – EPISODE 14) 2018, 91 min, DCP A shot-by-shot description of John Boorman’s neo-noir film (1967), starring Lee Marvin, co-starring Angie Dickinson, Keenan Wynn, and Carroll O’Connor. Total running time: ca. 105 min.

Tuesday 27, September

Imageless Films: Maya

Imageless Films: Maya

Bradley Eros MAYA or, Composition for Projection Booth, Projectors & Projectionists in the Maya Deren Theater (and booth) @ Anthology Film Archives 2016/22, ca. 40 min, projector performance “A site-specific cinema performance employing the myriad parameters of the technical apparatuses of analog film projection and light, using Anthology’s Maya Deren Theater projection booth & projectors and operated by our skilled projectionists. The work will include all of the variations of lenses, aperture plates, bulbs, lamps, gates, screen masking, shutter speeds, frame rates, change-over, focusing & framing, etc., in a composition for illuminated flicker and filmless geometries of light, for all types of projectors: 8mm, Super-8mm, 16mm, 35mm, and slide, from an instructional score for the performers. It is a work of contracted cinema, or cinéma concret, focused on the cinematographic machine and filmic light: an exercise in analog fetish, pushed towards the revelation of the invisible mechanisms, foregrounding & celebrating that which is usually hidden from sight.” –Bradley Eros “White light cloaks the hidden spectrum of colours within.” –Goethe, THEORY OF COLOURS “What the black of the shutter carves into the white of the screen…” –Eros, atomic cinema PLUS: Bradley Eros COLOUR THEORY (LIGHT ON LIGHT) [AFTER GOETHE] 2008-9/2022, 10 min, for multiple filmless projectors (8mm, 16mm, 35mm, slide), coloured gels, pre-recorded & live sound from machines COLOUR THEORY uses a multitude of white projector light [all possible variations: 35mm, 16mm, R8 & S8mm, 35mm slide] with a spectrum [RYB/OGV] of hand-manipulated coloured gels, moving apart & over-lapping in layers, to create a blended mixture of myriad shades, performed live from the booth as a sequence of variations from a colour-coded score.

Sunday 25, September

It All Started at the End

It All Started at the End

by Luis Ospina In Spanish with English subtitles, 2015, 209 min, DCP “IT ALL STARTED AT THE END builds out from Ospina’s multiple cancer treatments and his illness’s recurrence, and then documents Cali’s vibrant, tight-knit arts community that originated in the 1970s. Even though the film now comes across as his testament – he died from the illness in September 2019 – the forever-experimenting director made it in the spirit of an ongoing conversation rather than a final word on his career or epoch. Nevertheless, the ghosts of the departed weigh heavily on the film, particularly in the recorded conversations relating to the suicide of the brilliant Caicedo, at the early age of 25, which left a permanent mark on his entire cohort; and later, the deterioration and death of Ospina’s lifetime collaborator, Carlos Mayolo (deceased in 2007). The film’s bittersweet tone also reflects the disappointment of many artists close to Ospina who saw the heady revolutionary dreams and egalitarian ideals of the 1970s unfulfilled.” –Ela Bittencourt, FILM COMMENT

Sunday 25, September

Tuesday 27, September

Thursday 29, September

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Kalt in Kolumbien

Kalt in Kolumbien

by Dieter Schidor In English, German, and Spanish with English subtitles, 1984, 76 min, 16mm. Karen Lamassonne: Art Direction and Actor. Courtesy of the Kinemathek Hamburg. A long-lost, famously cursed film, the German-Colombian co-production KALT IN KOLUMBIEN was helmed by Dieter Schidor, an actor who appeared in Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s final film, QUERELLE, and simultaneously shot a documentary during that film’s production – THE WIZARD OF BABYLON (1982) – which included interview footage recorded just hours before Fassbinder’s fatal overdose. When Schidor was invited to the Cartagena Film Festival to present QUERELLE, he was taken with the city, and returned soon after to make KALT IN KOLUMBIEN, with an unlikely group of collaborators including German video artist Marcel Odenbach, New York writer, artist, actor, and cultural critic Gary Indiana, and Karen Lamassonne. Two years after the production, Schidor died of AIDS, while the film itself vanished into the archives, where it’s remained virtually unseen – aside from a lo-fi bootleg video copy – ever since. “In contrast to the fictionalized, exoticized colonial settings of Herzog’s [COBRA VERDE, filmed in Colombia], KALT IN KOLUMBIEN is explicitly set in the present with clear references to then-contemporary political events like the assassination of Justice Minister Rodrigo Lara Bonilla or the extermination of the Unión Patriótica, but with a few bizarre plot twists where fictional German characters – Hans Malitzky and Philip Grosvenor – stand in for real life protagonists Pablo Escobar and Sam Green, respectively. The story loosely follows the arrival of ex-convict Norbert Haim and his sidekick Jojo to Cartagena where Haim plans to kill his old partner Malitzky, a now powerful drug baron, as an act of vengeance for a long-ago betrayal. Ultimately no drama of any kind actually occurs: the absence of a discernible plot unfolds across a series of charged encounters populated by terse conversations, piercing gazes, and gay overtones – the last of these incarnated by Ricardo, the only significant Colombian character and object of everyone’s desire, especially that of the film’s butch narrator, Ulrike. What little is shown of the urban landscape is beautifully decrepit – its anonymous, languid residents contrasting sharply to the decadent, neurotic foreigners who seldom leave the rarefied interior spaces they inhabit.” –Michele Faguet Preceded by: Jorge Nieto & Luis Ospina IN SEARCH OF “MARIA” / EN BUSCA DE “MARIA” 1985, 16 min, 16mm-to-DCP. In Spanish with English subtitles. Karen Lamassonne: Art Direction. Courtesy of the Cinemateca de Bogota. “Based on the only four surviving shots of the first Colombian silent film, MARÍA (1921), by directors Máximo Calvo (Colombia) and Alfredo del Diestro (Spain), IN SEARCH OF ‘MARIA’ combines historical research, interviews, and scenic reconstruction to rescue the memory of a lost film.” –DOCLISBOA Oscar Campo VALERIA 1987, 25 min, 16mm. In Spanish with English subtitles. Karen Lamassonne: Art Direction, Editing, and Actor. Upon being informed of her father’s death, 10-year-old Valeria decides to look for him so she can ask him if he wants her to go to his funeral. Following his traces through the places that he frequented – the streets and bars of Cali, a psychiatric clinic – she moves between hallucinations and visions, until she discovers a shocking secret. Total running time: ca. 125 min.

Saturday 24, September

Wednesday 28, September

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Lorenzo's Oil

Lorenzo's Oil

by George Miller 1992, 129 min, 35mm. With Nick Nolte & Susan Sarandon. “This is a docudrama about a couple whose five-year-old son has a rare and mysterious degenerative disease called adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). It’s hard to make such a project sound good, but in its own quiet way this is an astonishing film, both as a medical detective story that sustains taut interest over an extended running time and as a piece of cinema combining unusually resourceful acting and direction. Director George Miller…was trained as a doctor and authored the script with Nick Enright. He brings to this material an infectious political passion to make difficult concepts lucid to everyone and to place medical science in the hands of people who can do something about it – which means that this movie winds up having a great deal to say about AIDS as well as ALD, not to mention medical bureaucracies and power structures in general.” –Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER

Saturday 20, August

Tuesday 23, August

Sunday 28, August

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Mad Max

Mad Max

by George Miller 1979, 93 min, 35mm The film that put both George Miller and Mel Gibson on the map, MAD MAX is – like the later films in the series – a still-striking exercise in cinematic montage and almost purely visual storytelling. Compared to the sequels, it’s a relatively minimalist film. Though a sense of social and technological breakdown is already present, it eschews much of its successors’ intricate post-apocalyptic world building in favor of a laconic, pared-to-the-bone, starkly mythic revenge scenario. Its narrative is not so much elaborated on, as it is distilled and fused with Gibson’s indelible, nearly wordless presence, the visceral action sequences, and the stark, dusty landscapes of Australia. “With the first MAD MAX I basically wanted to make a silent movie. With sound. The kind of movie that Hitchcock would say, ‘They didn’t have to read the subtitles in Japan’. […] I was particularly struck by the films of Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd and those kind of very kinetic action montage movies that they made. I think they were the true masters in that era. And basically I saw the action movie, particularly the car action movie, as an extension of that.” –George Miller, AUSTRALIAN SCREEN interview Preceded by: ST. VINCENT’S REVUE FILM 1971, 5 min, 16mm-to-digital. Courtesy of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. “While a hospital resident, Miller was involved in a short titled ST. VINCENT’S REVUE FILM, his first extant work available in the archives. […] Seemingly shot in and around St. Vincent’s, and just under five minutes in length, REVUE FILM is a silent work – with music but no dialogue – in a sketch comedy style. The lead role is taken by actor Nico Lathouris, who later appeared in MAD MAX and went on to work as a writer/dramaturg at Kennedy Miller on FURY ROAD. Lathouris performs in mime: barefoot, in white makeup and a top hat, he wanders around Sydney, humorously aggravating a group of nuns (most of whom are played by men), who chase him down and beat him. He then wakes up in hospital, where he receives treatment.” –James Robert Douglas, “The Kennedy Miller Method: A Half-Century of Australian Screen Production”

Monday 22, August

Wednesday 24, August

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Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

by George Miller 1981, 96 min, 35mm The MAD MAX series truly came into its own in the 1981 sequel (re-titled THE ROAD WARRIOR for the U.S. market). Taking full advantage of a bigger budget, a more experienced crew, and the lessons learned during the production of the previous film, Miller approached MAD MAX 2 less as a sequel than as an opportunity to realize his ambitions more fully than he had been able to in the first place. And MAD MAX 2 is nothing if not fully realized: the first film’s command of visual storytelling and emphasis on montage over dialogue is once again on full display, but this time Miller and crew take advantage of their resources to situate their mythically elemental narrative within a dystopic, post-apocalyptic world that’s conjured into being with a truly breathtaking level of inspired detail. With its iconic, nearly silent protagonist, unapologetically over-the-top characters, breathtakingly ambitious set design, and still-astonishing set pieces and stunts, MAD MAX 2 is a dizzying mixture of punk, kabuki, western, and custom-car action film. “MAD MAX 2 is by far the best of the Mad Max series. With its insane vehicles and fearful body-armour, it is a vision of Armageddon as autogeddon. MAD MAX 2 is punk’s Sistine Chapel.” –J.G. Ballard, ‘J.G. Ballard’s Top Ten Science Fiction Films,’ THE INDEPENDENT, 2005 “Set in a postapocalyptic Australia, where nomadic tribes battle each other for precious gasoline, it’s a highly stylized, roaringly dynamic action film that shuns plot and characterization in favor of a crazy iconographical mélange – it’s like the work of a western punk trucker de Sade.” –Dave Kehr, CHICAGO READER Preceded by: VIOLENCE IN THE CINEMA, PART 1 1971, 13 min, 16mm-to-digital. Courtesy of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. “A graphic satire on the representation of violence in the cinema, this early work by George Miller has ‘psychologist and media critic’, Dr. Edgar Fine, providing an academic account on the various theories around this subject. What starts as a fairly didactic and dry discourse on violence in the cinema takes a turn for the gruesomely demonstrative. This was also Miller’s first collaboration with producer Byron Kennedy, whom he met at the University of New South Wales. The success of this collaboration led them to form the production company Kennedy Miller and to embody their fascination with violence in the feature film, MAD MAX.” –ACMI

Sunday 21, August

Sunday 28, August

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Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

by George Miller 1985, 107 min, 35mm. Co-directed by George Ogilvie. Directed under a cloud after Miller’s producing partner Byron Kennedy died in a helicopter crash while scouting locations for the film, THUNDERDOME was the biggest-budgeted MAD MAX film to date. With its relatively elaborate plot, its scruffy band of orphaned tykes, and the participation of Tina Turner – who lends her star power to the role of Aunty “Entity”, the ruler of post-apocalyptic settlement Bartertown, and also recorded two songs for the soundtrack, including the chart-topping power ballad, “We Don’t Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)” – this third chapter was in many ways the installment that most resembled other mainstream Hollywood productions of the era. As a result its reputation has never matched that of its two predecessors. But if it’s the least successful of the MAD MAX films, it’s all relative: the imaginativeness of its set design and world building and the memorable performances from Gibson, Turner, and character actors like Bruce Spence (playing a role distinct from, but highly reminiscent of, his role in MAD MAX 2), render THUNDERDOME an exceptional big-budget spectacle. Preceded by: FRIEZE: AN UNDERGROUND FILM 1973, 10.5 min, 16mm-to-digital. Co-directed by Byron Kennedy. Courtesy of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. “Credited as ‘a film by Byron Kennedy with assistance from George Miller’, the short is a blunt piss-take on the work of their peers in the experimental, co-operative Melbourne and Sydney production scenes of the 1970s. Miller, appearing onscreen, critiques the film in progress – an essayistic meditation on ‘hot and cold’ (or so Kennedy facetiously claims in voiceover).” –James Robert Douglas, SENSES OF CINEMA

Thursday 18, August

Wednesday 24, August

Tuesday 30, August

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Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

Mad Max: Fury Road (2D)

by George Miller 2015, 120 min, 35mm (2D) Thirty years after MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME, the series made a long-awaited and triumphant return with FURY ROAD. The new film is in many ways a reworking of MAD MAX 2, but with an even more lavish attention to over-the-top custom car design and an even greater paring away of characterization, narrative, and exposition. Or to be more accurate, all of these elements are brilliantly fused into the action: FURY ROAD is essentially a feature-length car chase, one which is orchestrated with almost unbelievably propulsive momentum and the same inspired attention to detail that elevated MAD MAX 2 above other similar films. But what truly distinguishes FURY ROAD from the previous films in the series is that, here, Max morphs from Mel Gibson into Tom Hardy, and arguably takes a back seat as the film’s protagonist to Charlize Theron’s Imperator Furiosa, an unforgettable character who shifts the gender dynamic of the series in liberating ways. “It’s not uncommon to remark of great directors that they make the same film over and over again, re-treading over the same intellectual and thematic territory. This is truer of Miller than it is of many. FURY ROAD is almost certainly the best – or at least the most – of the MAX films, and the purest distillation of Miller’s project as a filmmaker. […] FURY ROAD shows not only that Miller revisits his same favored obsessions, but that he is capable of perfecting them.” –James Robert Douglas, SENSES OF CINEMA [We will be screening all three versions of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD: the 2D 35mm version screens on Fri, Aug 19 at 6:45 and Mon, Aug 29 at 9:00; the “Black & Chrome” version on Fri, Aug 26 at 9:15; and the 3D version on Sun, Aug 28 at 9:00.]

Friday 19, August

Monday 29, August

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Mad Max: Fury Road (3D)

Mad Max: Fury Road (3D)

by George Miller 2015, 120 min, DCP Thirty years after MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME, the series made a long-awaited and triumphant return with FURY ROAD. The new film is in many ways a reworking of MAD MAX 2, but with an even more lavish attention to over-the-top custom car design and an even greater paring away of characterization, narrative, and exposition. Or to be more accurate, all of these elements are brilliantly fused into the action: FURY ROAD is essentially a feature-length car chase, one which is orchestrated with almost unbelievably propulsive momentum and the same inspired attention to detail that elevated MAD MAX 2 above other similar films. But what truly distinguishes FURY ROAD from the previous films in the series is that, here, Max morphs from Mel Gibson into Tom Hardy, and arguably takes a back seat as the film’s protagonist to Charlize Theron’s Imperator Furiosa, an unforgettable character who shifts the gender dynamic of the series in liberating ways. “It’s not uncommon to remark of great directors that they make the same film over and over again, re-treading over the same intellectual and thematic territory. This is truer of Miller than it is of many. FURY ROAD is almost certainly the best – or at least the most – of the MAX films, and the purest distillation of Miller’s project as a filmmaker. […] FURY ROAD shows not only that Miller revisits his same favored obsessions, but that he is capable of perfecting them.” –James Robert Douglas, SENSES OF CINEMA [We will be screening all three versions of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD: the 2D 35mm version screens on Fri, Aug 19 at 6:45 and Mon, Aug 29 at 9:00; the “Black & Chrome” version on Fri, Aug 26 at 9:15; and the 3D version on Sun, Aug 28 at 9:00.]

Sunday 28, August

Mad Max: Fury Road (Black and Chrome)

Mad Max: Fury Road (Black and Chrome)

by George Miller 2015, 120 min, DCP Thirty years after MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME, the series made a long-awaited and triumphant return with FURY ROAD. The new film is in many ways a reworking of MAD MAX 2, but with an even more lavish attention to over-the-top custom car design and an even greater paring away of characterization, narrative, and exposition. Or to be more accurate, all of these elements are brilliantly fused into the action: FURY ROAD is essentially a feature-length car chase, one which is orchestrated with almost unbelievably propulsive momentum and the same inspired attention to detail that elevated MAD MAX 2 above other similar films. But what truly distinguishes FURY ROAD from the previous films in the series is that, here, Max morphs from Mel Gibson into Tom Hardy, and arguably takes a back seat as the film’s protagonist to Charlize Theron’s Imperator Furiosa, an unforgettable character who shifts the gender dynamic of the series in liberating ways. “It’s not uncommon to remark of great directors that they make the same film over and over again, re-treading over the same intellectual and thematic territory. This is truer of Miller than it is of many. FURY ROAD is almost certainly the best – or at least the most – of the MAX films, and the purest distillation of Miller’s project as a filmmaker. […] FURY ROAD shows not only that Miller revisits his same favored obsessions, but that he is capable of perfecting them.” –James Robert Douglas, SENSES OF CINEMA [We will be screening all three versions of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD: the 2D 35mm version screens on Fri, Aug 19 at 6:45 and Mon, Aug 29 at 9:00; the “Black & Chrome” version on Fri, Aug 26 at 9:15; and the 3D version on Sun, Aug 28 at 9:00.]

Friday 26, August

María Cano

María Cano

by Camila Loboguerrero In Spanish with projected English subtitles, 1990, 106 min, 35mm-to-DCP. In Spanish with projected English subtitles. Karen Lamassonne: Art Direction. Colombia in the 1920s. The country receives compensation for the separation from Panama and is opened up to foreign investment to undertake major development works. The mass of workers grows, but their conditions do not improve, since they remain subject to colonial-era traditions. In this context, a protest movement arises, and labor leaders emerge, among the most prominent of which is María Cano. A key figure in the modern history of Colombia, Cano fought on behalf of workers as well as women, confronted the power structure of the country, and ventured into literature as well. This film is a rousing and powerful account of her life and her extraordinary story.

Sunday 25, September

Wednesday 28, September

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Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

Miracles in Modern Medicine x 2

In 2019, as part of a World’s Fair-themed film series, Anthology presented screenings of an extraordinary work entitled MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE, a pioneering, taboo-busting medical film that was produced for and exhibited at Expo 67 in Montreal. A revolutionary film about the techno-medicalized body that made over 20,000 people faint during its presentation at the World’s Fair, MIRACLES featured the first uncensored color footage of hospital birth to be seen by a mass public, striking sequences of brain and open-heart surgery, and bizarre prostheses for child thalidomide victims. In its first iteration, created by Robert Cordier for the 1967 Montreal World’s Fair (Expo 67), MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE took the form of a combined film and theater piece. That initial production featured experimentally-tinged dialogue, which took place between actors on stage and actors on film. During the course of the event’s run, Expo managers tamed the show by redoing the film’s audio in a more conventionally didactic, documentary style. Steven Palmer, Library and Archives Canada film conservator Paul Gordon, and film editor Nick Hector have now restored Cordier’s original soundtrack, which includes performances by Cordier and his troupe, wild sound, and a nuanced audio mix that were largely suppressed in the second version of the film. That second version remains valuable, however, as the only record of the full script of the original stage and screen production. In conjunction with the presentation of the documentary GHOST ARTIST - a chronicle of both the strange and nearly lost story of MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE and of the life and history of its director, Robert Cordier – Anthology is pleased to present the world premiere of the restoration of Cordier’s original version of MIRACLES IN MODERN MEDICINE. The two versions will screen on alternate nights preceding Palmer and Riche’s documentary, but we will also present this program on Saturday and Sunday afternoon that will provide an opportunity to see them back-to-back. Total running time: ca. 45 min.

Saturday 3, September

Sunday 4, September

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Movies for the Blind + Foyer

Movies for the Blind + Foyer

Jeff Perkins MOVIES FOR THE BLIND, VOLUME 4 2021, ca. 60 min, audio Artist and filmmaker Jeff Perkins is best known as a Fluxus artist, co-founder of the legendary West Coast liquid light show group Single Wing Turquoise Bird, and the director of the documentaries THE PAINTER SAM FRANCIS (2008) and GEORGE (2018) (a portrait of Fluxus founder George Maciunas). But Perkins also worked as a NYC taxi driver for many years, an experience that led to the creation of his unique and invaluable archive of “Taxi Tapes”, which he has presented cinematically under the rubric of MOVIES FOR THE BLIND. ZAP Cassettes recently re-released the audio from MOVIES FOR THE BLIND in a three-volume series; this evening we will present the forthcoming Volume 4 as part of “Imageless Films”. “Perkins worked as a New York City taxi driver in the 1990s and, with encouragement from Nam June Paik, began recording conversations with his passengers and musings on his life as a cabbie. By 2002, Jeff had amassed hundreds of original cassette recordings and produced audio compilations that he presented in darkened cinema spaces as ‘Movies for the Blind.’ He ‘showed’ them at Anthology Film Archives (1996 and 1999), at the New York Underground Film Festival (2001), and at Rutgers University (2001), among other venues. Jeff released the ‘Movies for the Blind’ compilations as an ultra-limited CD-R box set in 2004. Working closely with him, I reissued them in their native cassette format on ZAP Cassettes, in three volumes, in 2016 and 2017. The ‘Movies for the Blind’ are part memoir, part proto-Taxi Cab Confessions, part Fluxus art piece, part imageless experimental cinema, part portrait of New York City and its various characters.” –John Klacsmann Followed by: Ismaïl Bahri FOYER 2016, 32 min, digital. In Tunisian Arabic with English subtitles. “FOYER is a film resulting from experiments in filming with a sheet of white paper placed in front of the camera, a few centimeters from the lens. The intuition behind it, very simple at first, was to take the camera onto the streets of Tunis and observe the way that this dividing element taints itself with the surrounding light, vibrates according to the movements of the air, darkens with the passage of a cloud or when a person or object gets too close… This experiment shifted when passers-by, attracted by this device, approached me to question me and talk. I then understood that these words and voices filled this blank paper both with poetic and political content, as subtle as it was unexpected. The film appeared somewhat in the way a roll of film is impressed by light when exposed to it: it was progressively affected by what happened to it, the environment in which it was shot.” –Ismaïl Bahri

Wednesday 28, September

Please Leave a Message

Please Leave a Message

This very special program features a carefully curated selection of some of the priceless messages that have graced Anthology’s voicemail system over the years. From the historically important to the utterly (and sublimely) absurd, they feature a cast of characters ranging from legendary avant-garde filmmakers, scholars, and other cultural figures to civilians whose legend has (until now) been confined to the offices of Anthology, thanks precisely to their witty, eloquent, eccentric – or in some cases unforgettably psychotic – voicemails. We’ve toyed with the idea of sharing these messages in some form for years, and the “Imageless Films” series provides a perfect pretext.

Wednesday 21, September

Pure Blood

Pure Blood

by Luis Ospina In Spanish with English subtitles, 1982, 100 min, 35mm-to-DCP. Karen Lamassonne: Art Direction, Assistant to the Director, Assistant Editor. “A key work of what Carlos Mayolo described as ‘Gótico tropical’ (Tropical Gothic) cinema, PURE BLOOD marks a development in the work of the Grupo de Cali filmmakers following the suicide of Andrés Caicedo in 1977. Shifting from documentary works to experiment with narrative feature films, Ospina created a unique hybrid that mixes genre conventions with intellectual parody. PURE BLOOD is a biting satire on Colombian landowners, social divisions and the vampirism at the heart of capitalism in Latin America. Inspired by a story from Ospina’s youth, the film follows the ‘Monster of the Valley’, an urban legend of a figure who prayed on the bodies and blood of young men. The film centers on a bedridden sugar tycoon who communicates with the outside world by closed circuit TV and is kept alive by blood transfusions.” –TATE MODERN

Friday 23, September

Monday 26, September

Friday 30, September

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So Is This + So's Nephew

So Is This + So's Nephew

This program brings together Michael Snow’s SO IS THIS – a work we’ve screened several times throughout the course of this series thanks to its status as perhaps the preeminent representative of the “text film” branch of the imageless film genre – and Jennifer Proctor’s SO’S NEPHEW BY REMES (THANX TO MICHAEL SNOW) BY JORRIE PENN CROFT, a response to Snow’s film in the form of a filmic translation of an article by film scholar Justin Remes. Marcel Duchamp & Man Ray ANEMIC CINEMA 1926, 7 min, 35mm, silent “Duchamp alternates head-on views of his illusion-producing roto-reliefs with similarly turned discs of words, elaborate French puns printed spirally, creating a fluctuation of illusory depth within a very narrow spectrum (from the slightly convex or slightly concave illusions) to the flat readings. In this, his only film, Duchamp typically crystallized the significance of the graphic film.” –P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM Michael Snow SO IS THIS 1982, 48 min, 16mm “[E]xtraordinary as Michael Snow’s new film is, it’s best described briefly – the better to keep its surprises intact. […] Snow manages to defamiliarize both film and language, creating a kind of moving concrete poetry while throwing a monkey wrench into a theoretical debate (is film a language?) that has been going on for 60 years. […] Snow creates a visual dynamo that loses nothing in motion for its absence of pictures.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE Jennifer Proctor SO’S NEPHEW BY REMES (THANX TO MICHAEL SNOW) BY JORRIE PENN CROFT 2015, 27.5 min, digital “This work is a textual video adaptation of Justin Remes’ essay, ‘Boundless Ontologies: Michael Snow, Wittgenstein, and the Textual Film,’ published in ‘Cinema Journal, 54.3, Spring 2015’. It was produced as part of ‘[in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film and Moving Image Studies 2.2, 2015’, a journal devoted to the form of the video essay, where I’ve also included a substantial Curator’s Note. I was honored to have been invited to create a video response to Remes’ essay, which examines the ontological status of the textual film (and film in general), and to engage so deeply with both his argument and the work of Michael Snow (namely SO IS THIS). In keeping with Snow’s playfulness, and delight in asserting durational control, this piece plays with time, language, and ambiguous authorship.” –Jennifer Proctor Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Tuesday 13, September

Terra Femme

Terra Femme

by Courtney Stephens 2017-21, 60 min, DCP NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Writer and filmmaker Courtney Stephens has, over the past decade, emerged as a crucial figure in the realms of experimental and documentary cinema, thanks to her numerous short films – several of which have found her working with archival film material – as well as the feature-length THE AMERICAN SECTOR (2020, co-directed by Pacho Velez). Her new essay-film/performance-piece, TERRA FEMME is constructed entirely from amateur travelogues filmed by women in the 1920s-50s. Moving between geographical essay, personal inquiry, and historical speculation, Stephens examines these films as both private documents and accidental ethnographies. The travelogues present a new type of traveler: no longer a male seeker of conquests, she might be a divorcee on a tour of biblical gardens, or a widow on a cruise to the North Pole. In rescuing the films of these unknown travelers from the archives, TERRA FEMME weaves together questions of female authorship, cinematic excavation, and the Western gaze, complicating the freedoms these women experienced while traveling through foreign landscapes. A film about longing for past worlds through cinematic excavation, TERRA FEMME reveals how this force flows in both directions, as women from the past convey themselves into the present through the power of their gaze. TERRA FEMME began life as an illustrated lecture, with Stephens presenting and discussing her archival finds in person – a format that mirrored the way the films might have been exhibited when they were shot. During the pandemic, Stephens edited the material into an hour-long essay film, with music by Sarah Davachi. During Anthology’s week-long engagement, we will present two incarnations of the film, with Stephens performing the narration live on Thursday, September 15 and Sunday, September 18. “In showing the filmmakers’ wide-ranging cinematic practices and points of view, [Stephens] pursues the underlying question of whether there is such a thing as the ‘female gaze’; she develops far-reaching analyses of women’s filmmaking in an era when few women had professional directing careers – and ultimately connects their work to the sociology and the spirit of travel itself.” –Richard Brody, NEW YORKER “By weaving together these archives, Stephens reveals the private yearnings of subjects seeking their place in the world, and the yearnings of a filmmaker seeking these subjectivities. TERRA FEMME captures a double process of self-learning, making it a perfect reflection of what museum curators like to call time-based media. Lyrical and searching, its layers of reality and thought accumulate, like sediment, into new formations of knowledge.” –Mathilde Walker-Billaud, BOMB The live version will be presented on Thurs, Sept 15 and Sun, Sept 18 at 7:30 each night; the pre-recorded version will screen on Fri, Sept 16 at 7:00 & 9:00, Sat, Sept 17 at 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00, Sun, Sept 18 at 5:30, and Mon-Wed, Sept 19-21 at 7:00 & 9:00 nightly.

Friday 16, September

Saturday 17, September

Sunday 18, September

Monday 19, September

Tuesday 20, September

Wednesday 21, September

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Terra Femme (Live Version)

Terra Femme (Live Version)

by Courtney Stephens 2017-21, 60 min, DCP NEW YORK THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Writer and filmmaker Courtney Stephens has, over the past decade, emerged as a crucial figure in the realms of experimental and documentary cinema, thanks to her numerous short films – several of which have found her working with archival film material – as well as the feature-length THE AMERICAN SECTOR (2020, co-directed by Pacho Velez). Her new essay-film/performance-piece, TERRA FEMME is constructed entirely from amateur travelogues filmed by women in the 1920s-50s. Moving between geographical essay, personal inquiry, and historical speculation, Stephens examines these films as both private documents and accidental ethnographies. The travelogues present a new type of traveler: no longer a male seeker of conquests, she might be a divorcee on a tour of biblical gardens, or a widow on a cruise to the North Pole. In rescuing the films of these unknown travelers from the archives, TERRA FEMME weaves together questions of female authorship, cinematic excavation, and the Western gaze, complicating the freedoms these women experienced while traveling through foreign landscapes. A film about longing for past worlds through cinematic excavation, TERRA FEMME reveals how this force flows in both directions, as women from the past convey themselves into the present through the power of their gaze. TERRA FEMME began life as an illustrated lecture, with Stephens presenting and discussing her archival finds in person – a format that mirrored the way the films might have been exhibited when they were shot. During the pandemic, Stephens edited the material into an hour-long essay film, with music by Sarah Davachi. During Anthology’s week-long engagement, we will present two incarnations of the film, with Stephens performing the narration live on Thursday, September 15 and Sunday, September 18. “In showing the filmmakers’ wide-ranging cinematic practices and points of view, [Stephens] pursues the underlying question of whether there is such a thing as the ‘female gaze’; she develops far-reaching analyses of women’s filmmaking in an era when few women had professional directing careers – and ultimately connects their work to the sociology and the spirit of travel itself.” –Richard Brody, NEW YORKER “By weaving together these archives, Stephens reveals the private yearnings of subjects seeking their place in the world, and the yearnings of a filmmaker seeking these subjectivities. TERRA FEMME captures a double process of self-learning, making it a perfect reflection of what museum curators like to call time-based media. Lyrical and searching, its layers of reality and thought accumulate, like sediment, into new formations of knowledge.” –Mathilde Walker-Billaud, BOMB The live version will be presented on Thurs, Sept 15 and Sun, Sept 18 at 7:30 each night; the pre-recorded version will screen on Fri, Sept 16 at 7:00 & 9:00, Sat, Sept 17 at 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00, Sun, Sept 18 at 5:30, and Mon-Wed, Sept 19-21 at 7:00 & 9:00 nightly.

Thursday 15, September

Sunday 18, September

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The Little Richard Story

The Little Richard Story

by William Klein 1980, 90 min, 16mm “Impossible to imagine attempting authorial distance (control) over the aura that is Little Richard. Which William Klein does not. Which is why THE LITTLE RICHARD STORY is a great, great film. Klein is dumb, nearly stupid, in the face (startling), body (possessed), voice (singular) of Richard, the self-proclaimed ‘Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll’ who changed everything. The first musical icon to exclaim/proclaim the persona of ‘bad nigger’ (greasy skin, greasy hair, loud), Richard was a sexual menace too (faggot in eyeliner; big faggot in stretch pants). In fact, what Klein shows in his nearly perfect, essayistic form is just how nightmarish his image might seem to you, the prototypical American. Whose black nightmare is Richard? Yours? And do you like it? Klein opens these questions up, making them more than reflective, by visiting Macon, Georgia (Richard’s hometown), where one hears the voices of women – of which Richard’s is a loving tribute. Working in a world they did not make, these women make it over by wailing, really mourning, the conditions – racism, sexism, class discrimination. Listening to them, we realize Richard had nothing to lose by crying so loudly too. Who would listen?” –Hilton Als, VILLAGE VOICE “William Klein captures flamboyant entertainer Little Richard, ‘America’s black superman,’ as he attempts to resolve the conflict between his divine calling and profane success. Acting on advice from his Bible-peddling managers, Little Richard walks off the film set, yet is barely missed as Klein quickly shifts focus from the man himself to the deconstruction of his status as cultural icon by way of a limitless array of impersonators and fans. As Little Richard says, ‘Elvis may have been the King, but I am the Queen.’” –WALKER ART CENTER AFA Film & ICP Museum Combo Ticket - $24 In addition to the regularly-priced tickets, we will be offering a special AFA + ICP Museum Combo Ticket option during the William Klein retrospective. Priced at $24, this ticket will cover a single screening of one of the William Klein films, plus discount admission to the International Center of Photography to view "William Klein: YES; Photographs, Paintings, Films, 1948–2013". Combo Ticket holders can show their ticket receipt or ticket stub at ICP for admission to the exhibition, which focuses on Klein’s fashion, abstract, and street photography, films, and paintings.

Wednesday 24, August

The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick

Rfor Sexual content including dialog and language.

by George Miller 1987, 118 min, 35mm A film that defies categorization as either light horror or feminist slapstick, THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK is a pleasantly campy (and less than faithful) adaptation of John Updike’s 1984 novel. The bewitching dream-team of Cher, Susan Sarandon, and Michelle Pfeiffer co-star as three sexually-frustrated New England women whose supernatural powers are awoken by the arrival of a devilishly misogynistic bachelor played with gusto by Jack Nicholson. The cat-fight-turned-battle-of-the-sexes-turned-sewing-circle that ensues is accompanied by a smorgasbord of special effects in what remains an indefinable example of comedic sorcery. “George Miller’s first full-length departure from the MAD MAX franchise, THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK can be viewed as female empowerment manifesto or as a male gaze-y supernatural story that keeps women in their traditional place. Sometimes it manages to be both of those things in the same scene.” –Jen Chaney, VULTURE

Thursday 18, August

Saturday 20, August

Friday 26, August

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Twilight Zone: The Movie

Twilight Zone: The Movie

by John Landis, Steven Spielberg, Joe Dante, and George Miller 1983, 101 min, 35mm “ROAD WARRIOR…caught the attention of Spielberg, who offered Miller a slot in TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE. His entry in this anthology, ‘Nightmare at 20,000 Feet,’ marks his first truly international production. This segment is unquestionably the strongest in the film, and it demonstrates from Miller a new facility with performance. His visual approach is typically robust, but it works closely in tandem with actor John Lithgow, playing a phobic airline passenger who is convinced that a gremlin is attacking the wing of his plane.” –James Robert Douglas, SENSES OF CINEMA “The first two [episodes] – an antiracist fable directed with sadistic relish by John Landis and a puerile, condescending fantasy by Steven Spielberg – are total stinkers, but things pick up with Joe Dante’s creepy, claustrophobic, and very funny study of a brattish kid who lives in a cartoon universe, and come slamming home with George Miller’s final sketch about a paranoid airline passenger. Extending the style of his MAD MAX films into an entirely different context, Miller left no doubt that he was the finest stylist to emerge in the early 80s, with a sense of narrative rhythm linked to visual development that is wholly original and ravishing.” –Dave Kehr, CHICAGO READER

Friday 19, August

Saturday 27, August

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Word Films: Yann Beauvais

Word Films: Yann Beauvais

This program features a selection of works – entirely or predominantly text-based – by filmmaker Yann Beauvais. One of the leading lights of French (and international) experimental cinema, Beauvais has furthered the cause through his own filmmaking, as well as through his work as a critic, curator, and co-founder in 1982 of Light Cone, the preeminent French organization devoted to the distribution, promotion, and preservation of avant-garde films. A pioneer of gay and queer cinema, Beauvais has been deeply committed to the struggle against AIDS, and has also questioned the forms of filmic politics and the ways in which cinema can serve as a voice for individuals and marginalized groups. VO/ID (1985-86, 5 min, double-screen 16mm) VO/ID juxtaposes two separate texts, one in French and the other in English. The texts question art and experimental cinema, the role of the market in shaping aesthetic criteria, and current politics. In each of the texts, words common to the other language appear, creating an indeterminacy of the word to this or that speech. This indeterminacy is increased by the many word games created between the two languages. STILL LIFE (1997, 11.5 min, digital) This film brings together several discourses vis-à-vis HIV/AIDS. On one hand texts written in English and French appear on the screen at variable speeds and according to several rhythmic modalities; on the other hand, on the soundtrack: men’s voices. TU, SEMPRE (2001, 38 min, 16mm-to-digital) “How should we describe a work such as TU, SEMPRE by Yann Beauvais? Visually, it consists of roughly 40 minutes of videotext in movement and arrest, largely white text varying in size on a black background, interspersed with a small number of images; its audio is a dirge of drone music by Thomas Köner punctuated by voice-overs by several individuals, sometimes one at a time, sometimes several at once. Text appears in French, English and Italian and voice-overs are in French and English. It is a work of immense complexity and depth and this is but the beginning of a possible description.” –Keith Sanborn EST ABSENTE (2004, 7 min, digital, silent) “Reading Rimbaud today means to relate his experiences, his desires, to ours – it means that we see a strong connection between his quest and what is today at stake in gay issues. Selecting pieces of poems and letters I have tried to give back a kind of emergency that I sense within his poetry.” –Yann Beauvais CO VID E (2020, 5 min, digital) A Cinetract about a pandemic. Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Saturday 17, September