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Sunday 22, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Sunday 22, May

Artist on Fire: The Work of Joyce Wieland

Artist on Fire: The Work of Joyce Wieland

Sunday 22, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Sunday 22, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Sunday 22, May

Monday 23, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Monday 23, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 1

Joyce Wieland, Program 1

Monday 23, May

Tuesday 24, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Tuesday 24, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 2: March 25, 1969

Joyce Wieland, Program 2: March 25, 1969

Tuesday 24, May

Wednesday 25, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Wednesday 25, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Wednesday 25, May

Thursday 26, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 3: Reason Over Passion

Joyce Wieland, Program 3: Reason Over Passion

Thursday 26, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Thursday 26, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Thursday 26, May

Friday 27, May

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

Friday 27, May

Regrouping

Regrouping

Friday 27, May

Saturday 28, May

Regrouping

Regrouping

Saturday 28, May

Born in Flames

Born in Flames

Saturday 28, May

EC: Harry Smith

EC: Harry Smith

Saturday 28, May

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

Saturday 28, May

Working Girls

Working Girls

Saturday 28, May

Sunday 29, May

Mono No Aware Community Screening PGM

Mono No Aware Community Screening PGM

Sunday 29, May

Regrouping

Regrouping

Sunday 29, May

Born in Flames

Born in Flames

Sunday 29, May

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

Sunday 29, May

EC: No President

EC: No President

Sunday 29, May

Working Girls

Working Girls

Sunday 29, May

Monday 30, May

Regrouping

Regrouping

Monday 30, May

Born in Flames

Born in Flames

Monday 30, May

Tuesday 31, May

Regrouping

Regrouping

Tuesday 31, May

New or Unseen Films Selected by Michael Snow

New or Unseen Films Selected by Michael Snow

Tuesday 31, May

Working Girls

Working Girls

Tuesday 31, May

Wednesday 1, June

Regrouping

Regrouping

Wednesday 1, June

Born in Flames

Born in Flames

Wednesday 1, June

Thursday 2, June

Regrouping

Regrouping

Thursday 2, June

Working Girls

Working Girls

Thursday 2, June

Friday 3, June

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Friday 3, June

Earth II

Earth II

Friday 3, June

Saturday 4, June

EC: Carriage Trade

EC: Carriage Trade

Saturday 4, June

Mr. Freedom

Mr. Freedom

Saturday 4, June

EC: Wavelength

EC: Wavelength

Saturday 4, June

The Model Couple

The Model Couple

Saturday 4, June

Sunday 5, June

EC: <---> (Back and Forth)

EC: <---> (Back and Forth)

Sunday 5, June

The Model Couple

The Model Couple

Sunday 5, June

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Sunday 5, June

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Sunday 5, June

Monday 6, June

Mr. Freedom

Mr. Freedom

Monday 6, June

Introduction to Susan Brockman

Introduction to Susan Brockman

Monday 6, June

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Monday 6, June

Tuesday 7, June

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Tuesday 7, June

Wednesday 8, June

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Wednesday 8, June

Thursday 9, June

EC: Kino-Pravda

EC: Kino-Pravda

Thursday 9, June

EC: Kino-Eye / Kinoglaz

EC: Kino-Eye / Kinoglaz

Thursday 9, June

Friday 10, June

EC: Forward, Soviet! / Shaghai, Soviet!

EC: Forward, Soviet! / Shaghai, Soviet!

Friday 10, June

New Red Order

New Red Order

Friday 10, June

EC: A Sixth of the World / Shestaia Chast Mira

EC: A Sixth of the World / Shestaia Chast Mira

Friday 10, June

Saturday 11, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 1

Jim Fletcher Prog. 1

Saturday 11, June

EC: The Eleventh Year / Odinnadtsayi

EC: The Eleventh Year / Odinnadtsayi

Saturday 11, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 2: The Darkness... + Icarus

Jim Fletcher Prog. 2: The Darkness... + Icarus

Saturday 11, June

EC: Man with a Movie Camera

EC: Man with a Movie Camera

Saturday 11, June

Sunday 12, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 3: Blood & Guts in High School

Jim Fletcher Prog. 3: Blood & Guts in High School

Sunday 12, June

EC: Enthusiasm, or Symphony of the Don Basin

EC: Enthusiasm, or Symphony of the Don Basin

Sunday 12, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 4: Tour Without End

Jim Fletcher Prog. 4: Tour Without End

Sunday 12, June

EC: Three Songs About Lenin / Tri Pesni O Leniny

EC: Three Songs About Lenin / Tri Pesni O Leniny

Sunday 12, June

Monday 13, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 5: Standing By: Gatz Backstage

Jim Fletcher Prog. 5: Standing By: Gatz Backstage

Monday 13, June

Tuesday 14, June

EC: Valentin/Vigo

EC: Valentin/Vigo

Tuesday 14, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 6

Jim Fletcher Prog. 6

Tuesday 14, June

Wednesday 15, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 7: Pinochet Porn

Jim Fletcher Prog. 7: Pinochet Porn

Wednesday 15, June

Thursday 16, June

EC: L'Atalante

EC: L'Atalante

Thursday 16, June

Friday 17, June

EC: Citizen Kane

EC: Citizen Kane

Friday 17, June

Dore O. Program 1

Dore O. Program 1

Friday 17, June

Saturday 18, June

Dore O. Program 2

Dore O. Program 2

Saturday 18, June

EC: L'Atalante

EC: L'Atalante

Saturday 18, June

Dore O. Program 3

Dore O. Program 3

Saturday 18, June

EC: Citizen Kane

EC: Citizen Kane

Saturday 18, June

Sunday 19, June

EC: Citizen Kane

EC: Citizen Kane

Sunday 19, June

Dore O. Program 1

Dore O. Program 1

Sunday 19, June

Vision Fest Program 1

Vision Fest Program 1

Sunday 19, June

Dore O. Program 2

Dore O. Program 2

Sunday 19, June

Monday 20, June

Vision Fest Program 2

Vision Fest Program 2

Monday 20, June

EC: Warhol / Watson & Weber / Whitney

EC: Warhol / Watson & Weber / Whitney

Monday 20, June

Tuesday 21, June

Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Tuesday 21, June

Thursday 23, June

Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Thursday 23, June

Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Thursday 23, June

Friday 24, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

Friday 24, June

EC: Warhol: Blow Job & Soap Opera

EC: Warhol: Blow Job & Soap Opera

Friday 24, June

Saturday 25, June

Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Saturday 25, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 2: Damned Summer

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 2: Damned Summer

Saturday 25, June

Imageless Films: Flicker Films

Imageless Films: Flicker Films

Saturday 25, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 3

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 3

Saturday 25, June

Sunday 26, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Sunday 26, June

Imageless Films: Found Sound

Imageless Films: Found Sound

Sunday 26, June

Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Sunday 26, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 5: Rio Corgo

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 5: Rio Corgo

Sunday 26, June

Monday 27, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 6: Bostofrio

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 6: Bostofrio

Monday 27, June

Imageless Films: Found Sound

Imageless Films: Found Sound

Monday 27, June

Tuesday 28, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 7

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 7

Tuesday 28, June

Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Tuesday 28, June

Wednesday 29, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

Wednesday 29, June

Thursday 30, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Thursday 30, June

Nam June Paik's Radical Fun

Nam June Paik's Radical Fun

Thursday 30, June

A New Old Play

A New Old Play

(JIAO MA TANG HUI) U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! by Qiu Jiongjiong (China, 2021, 179 min, DCP. In Mandarin with English subtitles. Part of the dGenerate Collection at Icarus Films.) The first fictional feature by contemporary artist and filmmaker Qiu Jiongjiong, A NEW OLD PLAY is a magnificent achievement – profoundly personal, highly stylized, and thrillingly ambitious in its historical sweep and filmic scale. It’s an evocation of a lost world, and of a vanishing theatrical form – 20th-century Sichuan opera – whose conventions it lovingly and meticulously recreates via hand-crafted, patently artificial sets, props, and backdrops. Inspired by the story of Qiu’s own grandfather, A NEW OLD PLAY depicts the life (and afterlife) of Qiu Fu, a leading actor of Sichuan opera, over the course of many decades and numerous social and political upheavals. Calling to mind Wang Bing’s PLATFORM, but adopting a radically different style and sensibility, A NEW OLD PLAY is a visual feast and a film of great humor and disarming emotional power. “Older generations of performers have passed away, and life’s shocks and disruptions have hastened the decline of our Sichuan opera. A century on, I have tried to reconstruct the traditional grammar of the form, to simulate and revive its flavor and its melodies. The film is a slice of my own history and my family’s; but also a travelogue of minstrels wandering together through this world and the next. They are my immediate forebears, and this is my ‘pre-biography.’” –Qiu Jiongjiong “The scope – inspired by Qiu’s own theatrical family – is impressive, starting with the troupes’ creation during the chaotic period of the 1920s before passing through war with Japan, the nationalists’ struggles, war with the ascendant communists, a trip to Taiwan, and a gradual dissolution of the players before Mao’s secured reign. For such an expansive tale, Qiu shows himself both cagey and inventive: the film, which frames its history as a reflection by its aged leader on the cusp of being given a drink of forgetfulness and pulled down to hell by demons, is presented in high artifice, with charmingly theatrical sets representing non-theatrical spaces, clearly lit on sound stages, and frequently shot frontally, like dioramas. […] Qiu has made a cleverly contained existential epic, an ode to the innate persistence of workers, artists, and people in the face of futility and poor fortune. It is a wonder the film carries it off with an empathetic sparkle – there must be some purpose to art, to life, after all.” –Daniel Kasman, MUBI “I haven’t seen a more aesthetically (and historically) daring, brilliant independent feature from China in years.” –Shelly Kraicer

Sunday 22, May

Monday 23, May

Tuesday 24, May

Wednesday 25, May

Thursday 26, May

Friday 27, May

Show Future Dates
Artist on Fire: The Work of Joyce Wieland

Artist on Fire: The Work of Joyce Wieland

Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. Kay Armatage ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987, 54 min, 16mm) This documentary combines expressionistic uses of cinematography and sound to examine Joyce Wieland’s work in all media. Avoiding both the chronological treatment usually found in retrospective considerations of artists’ work and the conventional voice-over narration common to films on art, ARTIST ON FIRE offers an analysis of thirty years of Wieland’s work that is rich in both detail and contextual information. Armatage combines a complex interweaving of multiple unscripted voices which are intricately edited and embedded in an evocative soundtrack of effects and music (mostly modern, electronic, and Canadian) with an illuminating juxtaposition of images: excerpts from Wieland’s work over twenty years, artworks in many modes, and actuality footage of Wieland at work. “An astoundingly dynamic piece of filmmaking – an intense marriage between Armatage and Wieland’s art.” –Carole Corbeil, GLOBE AND MAIL Preceded by: George Kuchar MOTEL CAPRI (1986, 18 min, 16mm. Starring Joyce Wieland.) “Mother Superior commits murder to save a soul from eternal damnation. MOTEL CAPRI was original material improvised as we went along. Scenes were concocted to suit the individual members of the class and my Catholic upbringing plus immersion in horror movies helped mold the plot. The class also was populated by students interested in splatter and macho cycle gear. Joyce Wieland, the Canadian artist and filmmaker, is featured here as the mother superior. She was reading her lines in the Marlon Brando technique (they were pasted onto the face of her student co-star).” –George Kuchar Munro Ferguson JUNE (2021, 7 min, digital) Made in memory of Joyce June Wieland, JUNE is a hand-drawn stereoscopic animation by NFB animator, Munro Ferguson. Resembling a three-dimensional abstract painting in motion, JUNE is Ferguson’s attempt to capture what it was like for him to know Joyce. Part 1, “Alzheimer’s”, is about the end of her life. Part 2, “Memory”, is about what she was like during the height of her creative powers. Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Sunday 22, May

Born in Flames

Born in Flames

When Anthology restored Lizzie Borden’s underground classic, BORN IN FLAMES, in 2016, we screened it alongside an archival 16mm print of her little-known, long-unscreened debut feature, the experimental documentary REGROUPING (1976), a fascinating film that shares with BORN IN FLAMES (1983) a profoundly innovative spirit and a deep commitment to transformational politics and social exploration. With its boldly unconventional form and its radically self-questioning approach to nonfiction cinema, Borden’s first film was a revelation and was soon thereafter reclaimed as a “lost feminist classic.” Now, six years later, it’s REGROUPING’s turn to take the spotlight, with a week of screenings of Anthology’s brand-new 16mm restoration. Alongside the new restoration we’ll present encore screenings of BORN IN FLAMES, as well as rare 35mm screenings of her equally accomplished follow-up, WORKING GIRLS (1986). Lizzie Borden will be here in person for selected screenings, alongside other special guests! Details to be announced soon. Lizzie Borden BORN IN FLAMES (1983, 85 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with restoration funding by The Hollywood Foreign Press Association and The Film Foundation.) A landmark of early-1980s American independent cinema, and made for only $40,000, Lizzie Borden’s BORN IN FLAMES is figuratively and literally an all-out attack on our patriarchal society, a call to arms for women everywhere. This Molotov cocktail of a film became an instant classic of feminist cinema upon its premiere at the 1983 Berlin Film Festival. An unlikely underground breakout that received widespread attention and commercial distribution, BORN IN FLAMES is a film whose impact has never waned. Set slightly in the future in a world largely resembling our own (or rather downtown NYC in the late 70s/early 80s), BORN IN FLAMES uses documentary techniques alongside invented narratives to tell the story of a feminist insurgency against the incumbent “Socialist Democratic” government. Promised social progress and equality by the current administration, women and minorities feel even more oppressed and abandoned than before. Competing pirate radio stations provide news to the confused public from different ideological positions within the radical movement, while the government attempts to quell it all. Featuring performances from Kathryn Bigelow, Adele Bertei, and Ron Vawter, and a fantastic theme song by The Red Krayola, BORN IN FLAMES examines the extremist agendas of two different feminist groups as they strategize, debate, take up arms, and form a true Women’s Army. The film swings between various protagonists and political viewpoints, creating an inclusive atmosphere that allows for a larger, very real political discussion to develop. “BORN IN FLAMES still maintains the legendary status it reached even before its completion. Four years in the making, shot by a half-dozen cinematographers on a shoestring budget using ‘real people’ (who age and change hairdo from one shot to the next) and real locations, and mixing pop music black rhythms and ‘new rock’, improvised acting, political speeches, humor and violence, the film had a cult following as soon as it was screened in Berlin, Paris, and New York.” –Berenice Reynaud, “Difficult Language: Notes on Independent Cinema by Women in the Eighties”

Saturday 28, May

Sunday 29, May

Monday 30, May

Wednesday 1, June

Show Future Dates
Dore O. Program 1

Dore O. Program 1

ALASKA (1968, 18 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “An emigration film: a dream of myself, the consequences of the act with society.” –Dore O. “[The] film’s interplay of old and new is striking. Undoubtedly, its sensuous, floating beauty makes it a treasure to those who revel in a language of cinema that can create images of the world anew through cinematic means. […] But also: reading the film’s broad movements alongside its smaller eddies yields a richer experience that is not limited to that of its maker but extends to a long, valuable, intellectual history of women experimenting with film form and meaning.” –Sarah Keller LAWALE (1969, 29 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “Memory is a cruel hope without awakening.” –Dore O. “While the film received minimal and at times dismissive attention…it can be seen to have been a touchstone in women’s experimental cinema through its formal and conceptual ties to the films of Yvonne Rainer, Marjorie Keller, and Chantal Akerman that appeared in its immediate wake. Taking on the substance of melodrama but replacing the appealing excesses that characterize the genre with challenging form, the filmmakers point to the lost object of irrecoverable but still intensely resonant female experience.” –Robin Blaetz KALDALON (1971, 45 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “A non-euclidean, ambiguously mangled and transfigured adventure film.” –Dore O. “Dore O.’s KALDALON, coming perhaps closest to the Brakhage aesthetic, is a very beautiful and complete work.” –Jonas Mekas Total running time: ca. 100 min.

Friday 17, June

Sunday 19, June

Show Future Dates
Dore O. Program 2

Dore O. Program 2

JÜM-JÜM (1967, 9 min, 16mm-to-DCP. Co-directed by Werner Nekes.) “Viable editing sequences, picture in picture; all in all, painted body and freedom.” –Dore O. “The girl on the swing turns into a staccato movement, a light/color symbol of movement. We become detached from the girl and can see only visual rhythms.” –Stephen Dwoskin BLONDE BARBAREI (1972, 25 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “A film for the liberation of sensuality, a film against the hospitalism of society.” –Dore O. “What emerges across many of O.’s films is a mood, a stimmung, embodied in the appearance and disappearance of fleeting images, a sensorial experience metaphoric of a barely-remembered past. In BLONDE BARBAREI, for example, layers of superimposed windows shift from side to side and are accompanied by a repetitive musical score. […] The images seem to reference old movies and settings, but sometimes become even more disturbing…set in a West German historical context where its World War II past hovers as an absurd dream, a dip into mass amnesia, a ‘personal’ cinematic vision is presented with shifting cultural connotations.” –Vera Dika KASKARA (1974, 21 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “A balance of being enclosed in divided space. […] The landscape exists only as a view through windows and doors. […] Attraction, blending, and repulsion of half of the film frame for the purpose of a sensual topology […] One image consumes another.” –Dore O. In her report from the 5th International Experimental-Film Competition in Knokke, Belgium, where Dore O. – as the very first female filmmaker – won the Grand Prize, Marjorie Keller wrote of KASKARA, “There is an unforgettable image of a door opening on to clear, white light. […] It is the rhythms of editing and superimposition that are so strikingly beautiful and meditative. The film looked very different from most of the other films at Knokke, more intuitive, complex, and visually composed.” FROZEN FLASHES (1977, 29 min, 16mm-to-DCP) “Lightning strikes the oblong of dreams out of the darkness.” –Dore O. “Exposure…has a double reading in FROZEN FLASHES: where light exposure indicates not just the technical revelation of the image, but its diegetic dimension too. [Dore O.] engages the viewer in a tantalizing game of narrative disclosure through light play, where images are momentarily revealed only to be withdrawn as they fade into darkness, or out into light. This luminous pulse orchestrates an emotive and dramatic tension in relation to FROZEN FLASHES’ enigmatic images.” –Lucy Reynolds Total running time: ca. 90 min.

Saturday 18, June

Sunday 19, June

Show Future Dates
Dore O. Program 3

Dore O. Program 3

STERN DES MÉLIÈS (1982, 11 min, 16mm) “The reality of the film is the viewer’s imagination. My North Pole in the Ruhr area. Dedicated to Georges Méliès.” –Dore O. BLINDMAN’S BALL (1988, 34 min, 16mm) “Seamlessly, the pictures descend upon her – it is getting tight – yet there are worlds in the wallpaper. Lying down, in a fever, a world of fantasy and dreams emerges – reality fractures into a thousand mirrors, which reflect the patient’s life, work, and memories in a multi-faceted manner.” –Dore O. XOANON (1994, 11 min, 16mm) “The sand painter blows things into pictures, shadows gather and dissolve.” –Dore O. Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Saturday 18, June

Earth II

Earth II

by Anti-Banality Union 2021, 97 min, digital Earth, present day. With human civilization facing ever-worsening climate calamities, the captains of industry set their sights on a new planet. Soon, a secret public-private partnership is selling tickets to Mars at a premium out of reach for the majority of the population, for whom the choice is either indentured servitude in the new offworld colony or perishing in the coming cataclysm. When the world’s governments decide to speed things up by declaring war on Earth and the rabble they’re leaving behind, the planet forges a strategic alliance with an unlikely partner: an underground luddite movement. Some will join the uprising, others will become fanatical defenders of entrenched power structures, while yet others will do everything in their power to continue living exactly the same way they always have. Its star-studded cast and astronomical production values – painstakingly purloined from some of the biggest blockbusters of the past three decades – make EARTH II the most expensive climate disaster epic to be produced for no money. Starring Keanu Reeves, Will Smith, and Matt Damon, EARTH II reminds us that no matter how far into its final death spiral our species might be, life finds a way.

Friday 3, June

EC: <---> (Back and Forth)

EC: <---> (Back and Forth)

by Michael Snow 1969, 50 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Restored by Anthology Film Archives with funding provided by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and The Film Foundation. Special thanks to Dan DeVincent, Simon Lund, and Adam Wangerin (Cineric, Inc.). “This neat, finely tuned, hypersensitive film examines the outside and inside of a banal prefab classroom, stares at an asymmetrical space so undistinguished that it’s hard to believe the whole movie is confined to it, and has this neckjerking camera gimmick which hits a wooden stop arm at each end of its swing. Basically it’s a perpetual motion film which ingeniously builds a sculptural effect by insisting on time-motion to the point where the camera’s swinging arcs and white wall field assume the hardness, the dimensions of a concrete beam. “In such a hard, drilling work, the wooden clap sounds are a terrific invention, and, as much as any single element, create the sculpture. Seeming to thrust the image outward off the screen, these clap effects are timed like a metronome, sometimes occurring with torrential frequency.” –Manny Farber, ARTFORUM, 1970

Sunday 5, June

EC: A Sixth of the World / Shestaia Chast Mira

EC: A Sixth of the World / Shestaia Chast Mira

1926, 74 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available. “[A SIXTH OF THE WORLD] was commissioned by the government trade agency, Gostorg. Vertov called [it] a ‘lyrical cine-poem,’ and he used declamatory titles to address the audience in the manner of Mayakovsky or Whitman. Dramatizing the full expanse of the Soviet Union (as well as demonstrating Vertov’s fast cutting), A SIXTH OF THE WORLD proved his first popular success and attracted considerable attention abroad.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Friday 10, June

EC: Carriage Trade

EC: Carriage Trade

by Warren Sonbert 1973 version, 61 min, 16mm “With CARRIAGE TRADE, Sonbert began to challenge the theories espoused by the great Soviet filmmakers of the 1920s; he particularly disliked the ‘knee-jerk’ reaction produced by Eisensteinian montage. In both lectures and writings about his own style of editing, Sonbert described CARRIAGE TRADE as ‘a jig-saw puzzle of postcards to produce varied displaced effects.’ This approach, according to Sonbert, ultimately affords the viewer multi-faceted readings of the connections between shots through the spectator’s assimilation of ‘the changing relations of the movement of objects, the gestures of figures, familiar worldwide icons, rituals and reactions, rhythm, spacing, and density of images.” –Jon Gartenberg

Saturday 4, June

EC: Citizen Kane

EC: Citizen Kane

by Orson Welles 1941, 119 min, 35mm, b&w “Welles’s first feature is probably the most respected, analyzed, and parodied of all films. Although its archival and historical value are unchallenged, CITIZEN KANE, nevertheless, seems fresh on each new viewing. The film touches on so many aspects of American life – politics and sex, friendship and betrayal, youth and old age – that it has become a film for all moods and generations. In its expansive way, it creates a kaleidoscopic panorama of a man’s life. Loosely based on the life of the newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, CITIZEN KANE is the saga of the rise to power of a ‘poor little rich boy’ starved for affection, as Welles himself was after his parents’ early deaths. It is also a meditation on emotional greed, the ease of amassing wealth, and the difficulty of sustaining love.” –MoMA

Friday 17, June

Saturday 18, June

Sunday 19, June

Show Future Dates
EC: Enthusiasm, or Symphony of the Don Basin

EC: Enthusiasm, or Symphony of the Don Basin

1931, 67 min, 35mm, b&w. In Russian with no subtitles; English synopsis available. ENTHUSIASM is Vertov’s vision of the transformation of social energies in a progressive society. The film is remarkable for its experimental use of sound and montage. Vertov himself invented special lightweight recording equipment to register the sounds of workers in the mines and factories of the Don Basin in this film. It is the best example of his theory of cinema which brings together “the film-eye and the radio-ear.” At one point he described the film as a “symphony of noises.”

Sunday 12, June

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

by Harry Smith 1957-62, 66 min, 16mm, b&w Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and Cineric, Inc. “NO. 12 can be seen as one moment – certainly the most elaborately crafted moment – of the single alchemical film which is Harry Smith’s life work. In its seriousness, its austerity, it is one of the strangest and most fascinating landmarks in the history of cinema. Its elaborately constructed soundtrack in which the sounds of various figures are systematically displaced onto other images reflects Smith’s abiding concern with auditory effects.” –P. Adams Sitney

Saturday 28, May

EC: Forward, Soviet! / Shaghai, Soviet!

EC: Forward, Soviet! / Shaghai, Soviet!

1925-26, 73 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available. “FORWARD, SOVIET! was commissioned by the Moscow soviet for the 1926 elections. Structurally, the film compares prerevolutionary famine and disease with the dynamism of revolutionary life. Then after a sequence on newborn babies, Vertov’s irrepressible futurism bursts forth. Buses and cars hold a political rally without the benefit of their drivers; an extended montage celebrates industrial forms with such gusto as to make Léger’s contemporaneous BALLET MÉCANIQUE seem virtually Luddite.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Friday 10, June

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

by Erich von Stroheim 140 min, 1924, 35mm, b&w, silent With Gibson Gowland, ZaSu Pitts, and Jean Hersholt. “Reduced from an eight-and-a-half-hour running time to slightly over two hours, [GREED] is perhaps more famous for the butcher job performed on it than for Stroheim’s great and genuine accomplishment. Though usually discussed as a masterpiece of realism (it was based on a novel by the naturalist writer Frank Norris), it is equally sublime in its high stylization, which ranges from the highly Brechtian spectacle of ZaSu Pitts making love to her gold coins to deep-focus compositions every bit as advanced as those in CITIZEN KANE. It is probably the most modern in feel of all silent films, establishing ideas that would not be developed until decades later.” –Dave Kehr, CHICAGO READER

Sunday 5, June

Tuesday 7, June

Wednesday 8, June

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EC: Harry Smith

EC: Harry Smith

FILM NOS. 1-5, 7, 10 (EARLY ABSTRACTIONS) (ca. 1946-57, 23 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.) FILM NO. 11 (MIRROR ANIMATIONS) (ca. 1957, 4 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) FILM NO. 14 (LATE SUPERIMPOSITIONS) (1964, 28 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.) “My cinematic excreta is of four varieties: – batiked animations made directly on film between 1939 and 1946; optically printed non-objective studies composed around 1950; semi-realistic animated collages made as part of my alchemical labors of 1957 to 1962; and chronologically super-imposed photographs of actualities formed since the latter year. All these works have been organized in specific patterns derived from the interlocking beats of the respiration, the heart and the EEG Alpha component and should be observed together in order, or not at all, for they are valuable works, works that will forever abide – they made me gray.” –Harry Smith Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Saturday 28, May

EC: Kino-Eye / Kinoglaz

EC: Kino-Eye / Kinoglaz

1925, 78 min, 16mm, b&w, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available. “KINOGLAZ is a didactic work, centered on episodes which articulate major preoccupations of the young Soviet regime: it deals with the manufacture and distribution of bread,…the processing and distribution of meat, celebrates the constructions of youth camps and discusses the problem of alcoholism. It introduces Vertov’s formal adoption of the articulation of filmmaking technique as his subject. It begins, as well, to suggest what we may understand by ‘the negative of time’ as a key ‘to the Communist decoding of reality.’ Looking for ‘the negative of time,’ we find it in the use of reverse motion as analytic strategy.” –Annette Michelson, “From Magician to Epistemologist”

Thursday 9, June

EC: Kino-Pravda

EC: Kino-Pravda

by Dziga Vertov 1922, 55 min, 35mm-to-digital. Courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum. “Between 1922 and 1925, a total of 23 issues of Dziga Vertov’s newsreel series KINO-PRAVDA (KINO-TRUTH) appeared (albeit irregularly and in very few copies). Vertov’s goal was to create a kind of ‘screen newspaper’; the title is a tribute to the newspaper Pravda founded by Lenin. Just like the KINONEDELJA (KINO-WEEK) newsreel series (1918-19), the KINO-PRAVDA issues offer a fascinating insight into the early Soviet Union and demonstrate the rapid development of Vertov’s film language. The 22 surviving issues (No. 12 is lost) have been digitized and subtitled in German and English by the Austrian Film Museum.” –AUSTRIAN FILM MUSEUM

Thursday 9, June

EC: L'Atalante

EC: L'Atalante

1934, 83 min, 35mm. In French with English subtitles. Vigo’s feature is outwardly a simple story: couple weds, couple has problems, couple reunites, but it’s transformed by the director’s poetic, idiosyncratic touch into a masterpiece. Cinematographer Boris Kaufman (the younger brother of Dziga Vertov) recalled, “He used everything around him: the sun, the moon, snow, night. Instead of fighting unfavorable conditions, he made them play a part.” Already in delicate health (at times he had to direct from a stretcher), the winter location shooting may have pushed Vigo over the edge – he died of lung disease at age 29, three weeks after the Paris premiere.

Thursday 16, June

Saturday 18, June

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EC: Man with a Movie Camera

EC: Man with a Movie Camera

1929, 104 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. No intertitles. “If Vertov had never made anything other than MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA he would still be among the cinema’s greatest masters. A kaleidoscopic city symphony – conjoining Moscow, Kiev, and Odessa in one dizzying metropolis – this is Vertov’s most complex film, matching the rhythms of a day to the cycle of life (birth, death, marriage, divorce) and the mechanisms of movie-making to the logic of production. Made without titles, the movie is at once a documentary portrait of the Soviet people, a reflexive essay on cinematic representation (as dazzling as it is didactic), and an ode to work itself as a process of transformation.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Saturday 11, June

EC: No President

EC: No President

by Jack Smith (1967-70, 45 min, 16mm. Restored print courtesy of the Gladstone Gallery.) “The last of Jack Smith’s 16mm features – austerely black and white, more an exercise in sensibility than craft – evolved out of his November 1967 program, Horror and Fantasy at Midnight. Like Ken Jacobs’s STAR SPANGLED TO DEATH, Horror and Fantasy at Midnight would mix original material with found footage including newsreel footage of the 1940 Republican Convention that nominated Wendell Willkie to run for president. By late March 1968, Horror and Fantasy had coalesced into Kidnapping and Auctioning of Wendell Willkie (sic) by the Love Bandit – an all black-and-white presentation starring writer Irving Rosenthal as the infant Wendell abducted by a mustachioed pirate and sold on the block of a slave market. In early January 1969, the movie had its theatrical premiere as NO PRESIDENT. For musical accompaniment Smith played records and also used the soundtracks of the found material, albeit slowed down for being projected at silent speed. The surviving version NO PRESIDENT alternates scenes shot in the Plaster Foundation with found footage – including a Lowell Thomas travelogue of Sumatra, a clip, apparently from the late 1940s, of an unidentified couple singing ‘A Sunday Kind of Love’, and newsreel footage of candidate Willkie addressing the future Farmers of America. […] Parker Tyler would hail NO PRESIDENT as ‘an even more daring exploitation of the themes in Flaming Creatures, and the Selection Committee for the newly established Anthology Film Archives voted to include both in its canon of essential cinema.” –J. Hoberman

Sunday 29, May

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

Jack Smith SCOTCH TAPE (1962, 3 min, 16mm) A junkyard musical. FLAMING CREATURES (1963, 45 min, 16mm, b&w) “[Smith] graced the anarchic liberation of new American cinema with graphic and rhythmic power worthy of the best of formal cinema. He has attained for the first time in motion pictures a high level of art which is absolutely lacking in decorum; and a treatment of sex which makes us aware of the restraint of all previous filmmakers.” –FILM CULTURE Ron Rice CHUMLUM (1964, 23 min, 16mm-to-35mm. With Jack Smith, Beverly Grant, Mario Montez, Joel Markman, Frances Francine, Guy Henson, Barry Titus, Zelda Nelson, Gerard Malanga, Barbara Rubin, and Frances Stillman. Music by Angus MacLise. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.) “A hallucinatory micro-epic filmed during lulls in the production of Smith’s NORMAL LOVE and one of the great ‘heroic doses’ of ’60s underground cinema, a movie so sumptuously and serenely psychedelic it appears to have been printed entirely on gauze.” –Chuck Stephens, CINEMA SCOPE Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Sunday 29, May

EC: The Eleventh Year / Odinnadtsayi

EC: The Eleventh Year / Odinnadtsayi

1928, 60 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. With Russian intertitles; English synopsis available. “Vertov’s ecstatic paean to industrial development was, like Eisenstein’s OCTOBER, commissioned to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Bolshevik revolution and was accused of the dread ‘formalism.’” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE Preceded by: Excerpts from KINO-PRAVDA 1922, 16 min, 16mm, silent Produced from 1922-25, Vertov’s KINO-PRAVDA was an ongoing series of newsreels that ultimately comprised 23 separate “issues” (of which 22 exist today, albeit some only in fragmentary form). Taken together, they created a record of Soviet life through a mix of documentary, animation, and direct address. The reel screening here showcases excerpts from the series, with footage documenting the reconstruction of the Moscow trolley system, tanks on the labor front, and starving children, and culminating with a fascinating call for “inquiries regarding traveling film shows.”

Saturday 11, June

EC: Three Songs About Lenin / Tri Pesni O Leniny

EC: Three Songs About Lenin / Tri Pesni O Leniny

1934, 60 min, 35mm, b&w. In Russian with no subtitles; English synopsis available. “Vertov’s ‘official’ Soviet masterpiece – a hagiographic compilation of lyrically edited stock footage and cinema’s first direct interviews – was the most successful (and compromised) movie he ever made.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Sunday 12, June

EC: Valentin/Vigo

EC: Valentin/Vigo

Karl Valentin CONFIRMATION DAY / DER FIRMLING 1934, 23 min, 35mm, b&w. In German with no subtitles; English synopsis available. “Valentin plays a drunken father treating his giggly young son to lunch, and the inspired muddle he creates out of a table, two chairs, an umbrella, and a watch chain rivals some of Laurel and Hardy’s best moments.” –J.R. Jones, CHICAGO READER Jean Vigo TARIS 1931, 9 min, 16mm & ZERO FOR CONDUCT / ZÉRO DE CONDUITE 1935, 44 min, 35mm, b&w. In French with English subtitles. An eloquent parable of freedom versus authority, Vigo’s film is set at a boys’ boarding school and undoubtedly echoes Vigo’s own unhappy experiences as a child. Under the pressure of various civic groups the film was removed from screens several months after its release in 1933. It was branded “anti-French” by censors and was not shown again in Paris until 1945. Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Tuesday 14, June

EC: Warhol / Watson & Weber / Whitney

EC: Warhol / Watson & Weber / Whitney

Andy Warhol EAT 1963, 35 min, 16mm, b&w, silent “A portrait of artist Robert Indiana, EAT is one of the classics of Warhol’s minimalist cinema. As Indiana slowly eats one mushroom, the action is rendered mysterious by Warhol’s decision to assemble the rolls out of order, so the mushroom appears to magically renew itself from time to time.” –Callie Angell James Sibley Watson & Melville Webber FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER 1928, 13 min, 16mm, b&w, silent “Filmed in a Rochester, New York, carriage house, this expressionist film is the earliest live-action dramatic film made by a collaboration of poets and artists in the United States. Watson devised the optical effects that distinguish the film, while Webber provided its visual design, based upon medieval frescoes.” –Robert A. Haller John & James Whitney FILM EXERCISES 1-5 1943-45, 18 min, 16mm “The visual images in these films were created by shining light through flexible masks, so that the camera was filming direct light rather than light reflected from drawings. The results seem like dazzling neon apparitions, that were as novel and shocking as the accompanying soundtrack.” –William Moritz James Whitney LAPIS 1963-66, 10 min, 16mm “The most elaborate example of a mandala in cinema. It utilizes a field of tiny dots, symmetrically organized in hundreds of very fine concentric rings, to generate slowly changing intricate patterns…. Both structurally and visually LAPIS conforms to the circular form of the mandala; its elaborate movements belie a fundamental stasis.” –P. Adams Sitney Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Monday 20, June

EC: Warhol: Blow Job & Soap Opera

EC: Warhol: Blow Job & Soap Opera

ANDY WARHOL BLOW JOB 1964, 36 min, 16mm, silent “Warhol’s unmoving camera remains focused in close-up on the head of a young man, never descending below his shoulders to show the sex act advertised by the film’s title, which is nevertheless legible, in slow motion, in the changing expressions passing across his face. By wittily restricting what his camera sees, Warhol frustrates the expectations of porn fans and film censors alike, while simultaneously implicating both audiences in the same illicit desire.” –Callie Angell SOAP OPERA 1964, 47 min, 16mm. Co-directed by Jerry Benjamin. “In SOAP OPERA, an unfinished project from 1964, Warhol explores the format of daytime television by intercutting his own silent footage of domestic drama with 16mm sound commercials, made by Lester Persky for Pillsbury Cake Mix, Secret Deodorant, Beauty Set Shampoo, and other products. This one reel excerpt contains some of the most strikingly ‘Pop’ imagery ever to appear in Warhol’s films, and invites interesting comparisons with his painted works.” –Callie Angell

Friday 24, June

EC: Wavelength

EC: Wavelength

by Michael Snow 1967, 45 min, 16mm “WAVELENGTH is without precedent in the purity of its confrontation with the essence of cinema: the relationships between illusion and fact, space and time, subject and object. It is the first post-Warhol, post-Minimal movie; one of the few films to engage those higher conceptual orders which occupy modern painting and sculpture. It has rightly been described as a ‘triumph of contemplative cinema.’” –Gene Youngblood, L.A. FREE PRESS

Saturday 4, June

Imageless Films: Flicker Films

Imageless Films: Flicker Films

Peter Kubelka ARNULF RAINER (1960, 7 min, 35mm, b&w) “With ARNULF RAINER…Kubelka arrived at the most elemental components of cinematography – namely light, absence of light, sound, silence. These are the four poles from which all of cinema, all of film is suspended. Stretched to their utmost limits, all illusionism is driven out.” –Peter Tscherkassky John Cavanaugh BLINK (Fluxfilm No. 5) (1966, 2.5 min, 16mm-to-digital, silent) “Flicker: White and black alternating frames.” –George Maciunas Victor Grauer ARCHANGEL (1966, 7.5 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) This film presents a series of flickering frames of primary colors to groaning tape manipulations. Jeff Weber UNTITLED (NEURAL NETWORK, NN_OXB_1) (2021, 1 min, 35mm, silent) A 1,440-frame-long film that has been made with a score generated and coded in Python. The structure of the film relies on the automated organization of six different grey tones that correspond to the dynamic range of the film print stock used. The film explores the idea of an externalization of the cognitive instance that occurs through the application of artificial intelligence, and the recursive principles it relies on: the work resonates and interferes with the very system that initially has constituted the model for the structure applied on it. Jeff Weber SEQUENCES, I (2021, 11 sec, 35mm, silent) SEQUENCES, II (2021, 11 sec, 35mm, silent) SEQUENCES, III (2021, 11 sec, 35mm, silent) SEQUENCES, IV (2021, 11 sec, 35mm, silent) These short films are built upon the number of grey tones determined by the dynamic range of the film print stock used, and converted into numeric values between 1 and 6. These then constitute an initial and arbitrary sequence that is altered and iterated through the program by means of a specific algorithm and a pre-determined method – a kind of weaving together of numeric values. Paul Sharits DECLARATIVE MODE (double screen version) 1976, 39 min, double-screen 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives. Produced with a grant from the NEA to celebrate America’s bicentennial, DECLARATIVE MODE is Paul Sharits’s intense meditation on Thomas Jefferson and the state of the union. This double-screen version was performed on occasion by Sharits and offers a breathtaking variation on one of his most transcendent films. “This film, rather than being ‘structural’, is ‘narrative like.’ We feel as if we are on some sort of journey, where we can never know/predict what is to ‘happen’ next. It is engaging, like a novel full of surprises. The ‘narrative’ feeling is like a soap opera, which just keeps twisting and turning, with no apparent resolution intended (but there is a closure on the purely formal level), as opposed to say MIAMI VICE wherein the dramatic line moves towards and achieves a weekly resolution. This work prefigures a long series of 30 min. chapters in a ‘Light Novel,’ PASARE, which I am presently working on (which could finally reach 40 hours in total length before I die). Aside from a recurrent red, white and blue phrase, there is no repetition in the film (repetition conventionally provides structural order).” –Paul Sharits Total running time: ca. 65 min.

Saturday 25, June

Imageless Films: Found Sound

Imageless Films: Found Sound

This program features a selection of films that make use of found soundtracks: fragments of typical sounds and music cues from Westerns in THE SONG OF RIO JIM, a soundtrack discovered abandoned on a shelf for LE MOTEUR DE L’ACTION, a 35mm optical soundtrack from AFA’s collection in HEAD/TAIL, the audio track from a documentary about domestic violence in SHELLY WINTERS, a collection of voicemail messages in INFINITE DISTANCES, and a looped excerpt from Orson Welles’s Mercury Theatre radio play of “Dracula” in Bradley Eros’s film performance, “mercury”. Maurice Lemaître THE SONG OF RIO JIM 1978, 6 min, 16mm Pays tribute to Ince and to Hart, ancestors and creators of the Wild West genre. Its classic cowboy narrative is imageless and played out in sounds that prompt the spectator to create their very own vision of the greatest Western ever filmed. Christian Lebrat LE MOTEUR DE L’ACTION 1985, 8.5 min, 16mm “I found that soundtrack abandoned on a shelf in an editing room. It had been hanging about there for a few weeks before I decided to listen to it. There you are, carefully cellotaped in the correct order of the editing rushes, claps, cuts and wrong frames of a film I don’t know anything about. That soundtrack immediately appealed to me. Its discontinuous and fragmentary aspect, nevertheless made sense, was a sort of transcription in the world of sounds of what had been so far visual in my other films.” –Christian Lebrat Andrew Lampert HEAD/TAIL 1970/2004, 3 min, 35mm optical soundtrack “Elected to the National Film Registry in 2007, HEAD/TAIL is the only imageless film that could still be banned in 31 states.” –Andrew Lampert Luther Price SHELLY WINTERS 2010, 8 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives. Special thanks to Ed Halter. “A film without images – only the sounds of interviews from a documentary about domestic violence. SHELLY WINTERS is a deeply unsettling experience, intensified by the incongruous joke of its title, suggesting how, even in the most abject of moments, we cling to the melodrama of our own lives. Pablo Alvarez-Mesa INFINITE DISTANCES 2022, 24 min, digital “Found answering machine recordings bring voices longing for a receiver into the realm of the theater, offering hope for connection through a collective experience.” –Inney Prakash Bradley Eros mercury 1999, 7 min, 16mm black leader loop, scissors, projection light, mylar screen, cassette tape sound “In the context of an ‘Imageless Films’ series, it’s significant that ‘mercury’ is radio as cinema, ~ a looped excerpt from Orson Welles’s Mercury Theatre radio play of DRACULA, a performance of sound creating sight, but especially, the utterances and hallucinated descriptions of Mina (from Bram Stoker’s novel) in a trance, picturing what she visualizes in a hypnotized state: the narcoleptic sibilances of a somnambulistic cinema, manifesting what is not present to others ~ & the experience ends (for the live audience) with a shock of mirrored reflection ~ something real in the room!” –Bradley Eros Total running time: ca. 65 min.

Sunday 26, June

Monday 27, June

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Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Imageless Films: I Had Nowhere to Go

Douglas Gordon I HAD NOWHERE TO GO 2016, 97 min, digital. With Jonas Mekas. Artist Douglas Gordon’s I HAD NOWHERE TO GO is a feature-length portrait of Jonas Mekas, filmmaker, poet, artist, and Anthology’s co-founder. Though numerous documentaries have been made about and with Mekas, Gordon’s film distinguishes itself both by focusing on Mekas’s experiences prior to his emergence as a major figure of New York’s underground cultural scene in the 1950s, and by its radical formal approach. Taking its title from Mekas’s memoir of his youth in Lithuania, his years spent in forced labor and displaced persons camps during and following WWII, and his eventual emigration to the U.S., I HAD NOWHERE TO GO features a soundtrack devoted primarily to Mekas reading from the memoir, while the visual track is almost entirely imageless (save for brief and infrequent flashes of imagery). The result is a hypnotic work that harnesses the power of the human voice to bear witness, to conjure a wealth of imagery that renders photography nearly superfluous, and to achieve a form of storytelling that conveys not only experiences but the traces left by those experiences. “With an immersive sound environment and intermittent, fleeting images that stand in evocative juxtaposition to Mekas’s anecdotes, Gordon’s film reveals in its subject a puckish humor that outweighs despair, and an unabated zest for life that both illuminates and softens the sadness. A deeply moving tribute from one great artist to another and a singular work in its own right, I HAD NOWHERE TO GO has timely resonance today as mass migratory movements are displacing millions of people throughout the world as refugees, exiles, and stateless persons. While Mekas is certainly no ordinary person, the story he tells is a profoundly humble one, as much about daily survival as it is about aspiring to accomplish so much more.” –Andréa Picard, TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Thursday 23, June

Saturday 25, June

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Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Imageless Films: mythicPotentialities

Lawrence Andrews mythicPotentialities 2021, 60 min, digital. Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York. “A sound-essay set in the Tallahatchie County Second District Courtroom in Sumner, Mississippi, mythicPotentialities is an exploration of the event said to have galvanized the civil rights movement in America, the murder of Emmett Till, the trial that followed, and the way these event have been mediated through documentary text like EYES ON THE PRIZE, THE MURDER OF EMMET TILL, and numerous other books, plays, poems and articles. The work uses as its entry point how these texts, both documentary and fiction have constructed Till’s Uncle, Moses Wright, from a limited list of predicates, and as a result fall far short of capturing the complexity of his being. The project draws connections between this documentary predication of Wright, and Giorgio Agamben’s resistance to predication as expressed in his notion of ‘whatever being’. The essay also explores what happens when we destabilize our notion of what constitutes blackness with the absence of predication, and reconstitute it as an open space of creativity, play and invention, a place of pure potentiality, rather than a stable category of existence. Sonically the work also draws relationships between this absence of predication, and how sound space can be heard without the language we use to describe it, asking the listener to embrace the sensuous aspects of pure sound.” –ONION CITY EXPERIMENTAL FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL

Thursday 23, June

Sunday 26, June

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Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Imageless Films: ownerBuilt

Lawrence Andrews ownerBuilt 2008, 59 min, digital In this chapter of “Imageless Films”, we present two sound-essay projects by Bay Area film, video, and installation artist Lawrence Andrews (see below for details about Andrews’s most recent piece, mythicPotentialities). Since the late 1980s, Andrews has created a body of work in which violence, exploitation, and racism are seen in relation to media representation, art-making and art history, institutions, social systems, and cultural difference. First produced in 2008, ownerBuilt was re-worked in 2013 as an animated film, but we will be presenting the original, audio-only version. “Hurricane Katrina and the ensuing aftermath destroyed Noel’s community and home. He is rebuilding, and as he rebuilds, he evokes the past through the enlistment of his personal archives. His memories are complicated by the tragic events that occurred on the Danziger Bridge on September 4, 2005. As Noel reflects back on what has been lost, the story that he tells about his neighborhood is affected by the story of innocent people gunned down while attempting to cross a bridge in search of safety, and for Noel their plight clarifies many things. […] ownerBuilt firmly occupies and is concerned with the space around the margins of society. This work therefore imagines the various ways anonymity can function in that space, especially as it relates to the problems of visibility and the attainment of political power. Ultimately, as an aural performance reconfigured in cinematic space, ownerBuilt is envisioned as a Radical Sound Project, where the sound of the dog wags the tail of the picture, positioning sound as the privileged track and effectually dethroning image.” –Lawrence Andrews

Tuesday 21, June

Tuesday 28, June

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Introduction to Susan Brockman

Introduction to Susan Brockman

Susan Brockman (1937-2001) was a filmmaker and photographer active in NYC and East Hampton from the 1960s-90s. As a member of the collective Women/Artist/Filmmakers, she made several short films on themes of beauty, desire, and close observation. Sometimes inspired by literary, performance, or fine arts sources, Brockman’s films conjure deep emotions through her exquisite photography and skillful editing. In the three films selected for this screening – DEPOT (1975), HOTHOUSE FLOWER (1978), and LEE’S FERRY (1983, with Sally Gross) – Brockman explores interior environments of both physical and mental realms. DEPOT is a wry homage to dancer Ruth St. Denis and ideals of beauty. The film features the artist striking classical poses in a dramatically lit room. Gauzy curtains and billowing smoke, accompanied by the sounds of a train that punctuate the mostly still, black-and-white image, suggest a timeless anticipation of arrival and departure. LEE’S FERRY also features a female figure slowly moving within a constructed environment. Set to baroque organ music by Keith Jarrett and filmed against brightly painted slides by Joan Kurahara, Brockman’s record of dancer Sally Gross gently merges body, image, and sound. Also without dialogue, but with gestures toward narrative, HOTHOUSE FLOWER depicts women at work: making images, writing, or presenting their bodies in contrast with visualizations of their subconscious. In Brockman’s vision, imagination and dreaming are integral parts of the women’s creative process. Filmed by photographer Peter Moore in 1964, STOCKHAUSEN’S ORIGINALE: DOUBLETAKES documents a performance composed and scripted by Karlheinz Stockhausen, directed by Allan Kaprow, and starring Nam June Paik. Moore filmed two performances held at Judson Hall during Charlotte Moorman’s 2nd Annual New York Avant Garde Festival but left the footage unedited for 30 years. Having recently edited works by Danny Seymour and Robert Frank, Brockman offered to complete the film. When Barbara Moore decided to produce the film in 1994, following her husband’s death, Brockman was brought on as editor. Susan Brockman DEPOT 1975, 11.5 min, 16mm Susan Brockman HOTHOUSE FLOWER 1978, 13 min, 16mm Susan Brockman & Sally Gross LEE’S FERRY 1983, 7.5 min, 16mm Peter Moore STOCKHAUSEN’S ORIGINALE: DOUBLETAKES 1964/94, 30 min, 16mm Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Monday 6, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 1

Jim Fletcher Prog. 1

PROGRAM 1: Roland Ellis BREAK DOWN 2019, 10 min, digital A paranoid man is convinced that someone is reading his mind, and he might be right. Tim Etchells WE ARE THE KING OF VENTILATORS 2020, 9 min, digital A compelling and prescient performance to camera by Jim Fletcher, directed by Tim Etchells, with text by Chris Thorpe. The work takes a phrase about U.S. ventilator production repeated by Donald Trump during the Covid-19 epidemic, and places it in sharp counterpoint with original material to create a comical and unsettling reflection on power, mortality, and delusion. Richard Maxwell THE FEUD OTHER 2007, 23 min, digital Two men wander through a snow-covered forest, finding shelter that is not their own. Richard Maxwell SHOWCASE 2003, 30 min, digital This video documents a NYC Players production that was unusual even by their shape-shifting, ceaselessly experimental standards. Comprising a monologue delivered by a businessman in a well-appointed but non-descript hotel room, SHOWCASE was (initially and for selected subsequent performances) performed – for necessarily limited audiences – in actual hotel rooms, with the viewers sharing cramped quarters with the cast of two: Jim Fletcher as the businessman and another actor (in the video version, Bob Feldman) as his shadow. “Jim, a businessman staying in a hotel, wakes up in bed, talking to himself. He also addresses his shadow, and anyone else in the room with them. Gradually getting dressed, he discusses life on the road, memories, moron jokes, the conference he is attending, business strategies, and a pivotal deal that went down recently under intimate circumstances. He sings.” –NYC PLAYERS Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Saturday 11, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 2: The Darkness... + Icarus

Jim Fletcher Prog. 2: The Darkness... + Icarus

PROGRAM 2: Richard Maxwell THE DARKNESS OF THIS READING 2005, 58 min, digital In the future, private security firms vie for turf. A rookie employee is sent to scout a new territory. He meets a woman in the town who makes him question his outlook. The woman turns out to have ties to a competing security firm which has already staked its claim on the town. He is harassed and driven away by a series of ambiguous relationships. Nicholas Elliott ICARUS 2014, 16 min, 16mm-to-digital “Desire and emotion pervade this enigmatic hangout film, in which a procession of mystery men emerge ex nihilo and seek shelter in a young woman’s cabin.” –NEW DIRECTORS/NEW FILMS

Saturday 11, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 3: Blood & Guts in High School

Jim Fletcher Prog. 3: Blood & Guts in High School

Laura Parnes BLOOD AND GUTS IN HIGH SCHOOL 2007, 50 min, digital BLOOD AND GUTS IN HIGH SCHOOL features actress Stephanie Vella in a series of video installations that re-imagine punk-feminist icon Kathy Acker’s book of the same title. The book received notoriety from 1978-82 during the rise of Reagan republicanism and the emergence of punk rock. In Parnes’s interpretation, each video-chapter presents a typical scene in the life of Janie bracketed by U.S. news events from the time period in which the book was written. These events saturate the character’s daily experience, informing her adolescent, nihilistic worldview and her desire for rebellion. As the viewer looks back at pivotal historical events (Jonestown Massacre, Moral Majority, Three Mile Island, etc.) connections are drawn in relation to our current political situation. “Shot with an hallucinat[ory] Kubrickian eye, BLOOD AND GUTS brings a sleek cinematic esthetic to the often ineptly-lensed genre of gallery video, and offers the form a new role: as Hollywood’s unconscious, peeping into the nightmare from which we cannot awake.” –Ed Halter Preceded by: Laura Parnes THE ONLY ONES LEFT 2007, 6.5 min, digital This short work (originally a three-channel installation) weaves film noir and mafia genre references with CEO diatribes, while also exposing the conventions of the feature film climax. The three channels of video depict all plot points of the Hollywood film climax concurrently. The channels are arranged chronologically from left to right. This simultaneity draws attention to the familiarity of the subject matter and the inevitability of the violent consequences awaiting the characters.

Sunday 12, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 4: Tour Without End

Jim Fletcher Prog. 4: Tour Without End

Laura Parnes TOUR WITHOUT END 2018, 92 min, digital “Following the fictional band Munchausen through New York’s alternative music scene, Laura Parnes’s satirical doc-fiction hybrid TOUR WITHOUT END chronicles a milieu pinched by local hyper-gentrification and spun by national politics. Supported by a veritable who’s who of downtown luminaries (Eileen Myles, Gary Indiana, Kathleen Hanna, K8 Hardy, and more) playing versions of themselves, Munchausen (played by the The Wooster Group’s Kate Valk and New York City Players’ Jim Fletcher) serve as our guide to a contemporary DIY world as vibrant as it is precarious. Elder statesman of New York bohemia, Munchausen thread the needle between several decades of New York art subcultures, mixing with an intergenerational group of artists and taking a long view of a shared culture dominated by the young. Shot between 2014 and early 2018, the film never leaves the political situation far from the frame, with our players entering the eye of the storm on a brief sojourn to Cleveland during the RNC, and rallying the community in the post-election spiral, exemplified by a show stopping performance by The Julie Ruin the night after Trump’s election. Between performances by bands like Eartheater, Shannon Funchess, Macy Rodman and Youthquake, Parnes stages semi-scripted scenes, creating a portrait of a living artistic community; gossiping backstage, humoring tone-deaf marketing pitches, enduring patronizing interviewers, comforting one another, enjoying each other’s work, and attempting to make sense of our increasingly disturbing historical moment.” –Nellie Killian, FILM COMMENT

Sunday 12, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 5: Standing By: Gatz Backstage

Jim Fletcher Prog. 5: Standing By: Gatz Backstage

Shaun Irons STANDING BY: GATZ BACKSTAGE 2014, 79 min, digital. Edited and co-produced by Lauren Petty. Elevator Repair Service’s renowned production, GATZ, was described by Ben Brantley of the New York Times as “the most remarkable achievement in theater not only of this year but also of this decade” upon its initial run in 2005. Encompassing every word of The Great Gatsby, and featuring an extraordinary cast including Scott Shepherd as Nick and Jim Fletcher as Gatsby himself, GATZ takes place in a non-descript office in which one of the employees begins reading Fitzgerald’s novel. Gradually, the reality of the novel seeps into the reality of the office. A more than seven-hour experience, GATZ is a monumental, endlessly inventive, and beautifully acted work, and undoubtedly ranks among the highlights of 21st-century American theater. Shaun Irons’s STANDING BY is anything but a conventional making-of documentary: rather than using “backstage” as shorthand for a glimpse into the beginning-to-end creation of a production, here it’s meant quite literally, with the film focusing entirely on the backstage area during the performance. Following the company through a composite day, STANDING BY explores the behavior of the actors when they’re in between scenes, and the atmosphere that prevails offstage. Irons captures the inherent tension between inertia and explosive energy, as the actors depart the charged, public space of the stage for a kind of limbo zone, where they rest, check email, or watch the Wimbledon finals as they await their cue to once again unleash their energy into performance. Far from a familiar theatrical document or a talking heads film, STANDING BY is a poetic evocation of a mood unique to live theater, and a fascinating glimpse into the singular experience of stage performers.

Monday 13, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 6

Jim Fletcher Prog. 6

Chris Kraus THE GOLDEN BOWL OR REPRESSION (1984-88, 12 min, digital) “In THE GOLDEN BOWL OR REPRESSION, inspired partly by the Henry James novel, you can feel the hangover of ’70s New York: bankruptcy, dereliction, Patti Smith punk-poetry; images of empty rooms and silent people not connecting, even when they’re having sex.” –Martha Schwendener, VILLAGE VOICE Shaun Irons & Lauren Petty WHY WHY ALWAYS – 5 INTERLUDES (2017, 8 min, digital) In this sci-fi misadventure of secret agents and seductresses, where ALPHAVILLE meets ASMR, mesmeric whispers fill the air, lighters flash, linens are folded, and a super computer is foiled. WHY WHY ALWAYS conjures a live cine-performance through the interplay of otherworldly video, music, sound, and technology. John Brattin THE TRIUMPH OF NIGHT (2006, 23 min, digital) A young woman is employed as a companion for a wealthy and sickly woman in a large house she shares with her homicidal husband, some weird servants, and a ghost. Zoe Beloff GLASS HOUSE (2015, 21 min, digital. With Jim Fletcher & Kate Valk.) A film based on Sergei Eisenstein’s notes and drawings for an unrealized science fiction movie that he pitched to Paramount Studios in 1930. Featuring Jim Fletcher and Kate Valk in a vertically-oriented narrative about an all-glass skyscraper, the theme of GLASS HOUSE is the architecture of surveillance. Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Tuesday 14, June

Jim Fletcher Prog. 7: Pinochet Porn

Jim Fletcher Prog. 7: Pinochet Porn

Ellen Cantor PINOCHET PORN 2008-16, 123 min, Super-8mm-to-digital An epic experimental film, PINOCHET PORN embodies – though a dizzying array of stories and narrative methods – the multifaceted work of artist Ellen Cantor. Using her 2004 series of 82 drawings, Circus Lives from Hell, as an unconventional “script,” Cantor worked on PINOCHET PORN, her most ambitious project, for the last five years of her life. The feature-length, episodic narrative, about the intertwined lives of five children and their maturation into adulthood, would be completed posthumously by her close collaborators – including her cast and crew – according to her directives. Using Super-8mm film, archival video footage, and digital animated drawings, PINOCHET PORN takes the form of a soap opera, at once tragic and comic, and marked by a subversive sexuality. Its story weaves between personal, political, and historical circumstances, obliquely revolving around the political discord in Chile during the regime of General Augusto Pinochet. The film is also a document of an extended moment in New York and London avant-garde art and culture, featuring a range of artists, curators, writers, filmmakers, fixtures of the underground, musicians, and their children.

Wednesday 15, June

Joyce Wieland, Program 1

Joyce Wieland, Program 1

Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. PROGRAM 1: LARRY’S RECENT BEHAVIOUR (1963, 16.5 min, 16mm) One of Wieland’s earliest works, this film has been described by Simon Field as an “irreverent and willfully juvenile examination” of a nasty habit that Larry has recently acquired. PEGGY’S BLUE SKYLIGHT 1964, 12 min, 16mm Filmed in Wieland and Michael Snow’s loft in New York, the film covers a day of friends visiting, writing, and drawing from noon of one day to dawn the next day. PATRIOTISM (1964, 4 min, 16mm) Wieland’s kinetic romp casts David Shackman as an overexposed sleeper dogged by a patriotic march of tube steaks that finally refigures him as our most familiar icon of freedom. PATRIOTISM, PART II 1965, 4 min, 16mm, silent “In a way, a portrait of Dave Shackman with the American flag. The ending is a stop-motion animation of a set table with food moving and swirling and finally gathering together in a ball.” –Joyce Wieland WATER SARK (1965, 13.5 min, 16mm) “I decided to make a film at my kitchen table, there is nothing like knowing my table. The high art of the housewife. You take prisms, glass, lights and myself to it. ‘The Housewife is High.’ WATER SARK is a film sculpture, being made while you wait.” –Joyce Wieland BARBARA’S BLINDNESS (1965, 16 min, 16mm. Co-directed with Betty Ferguson.) “A collage film. We started out with a dull film about a little blind girl named Mary and ended up with something that made us crazy.” –Joyce Wieland Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Monday 23, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 2: March 25, 1969

Joyce Wieland, Program 2: March 25, 1969

This spring the Jewish Museum presents “Jonas Mekas: The Camera Was Always Running”, a major exhibition celebrating the centenary of filmmaker, poet, artist, and Anthology Film Archives co-founder Jonas Mekas. This new exhibition, however, does not represent the first intersection between Jonas, the Jewish Museum, and the realm of cinema that Anthology was founded to preserve and present. From 1963-70, Mekas and his collaborators organized dozens and dozens of experimental film programs, under the auspices of an organization that was known briefly as the Film-Maker’s Showcase before adopting its permanent name, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque. A roving screening series, which was in some ways a kind of precursor to Anthology, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque hopped from venue to venue frequently during the course of its existence, with residencies at the New Yorker Theater, the Astor Place Playhouse, 125 West 41st Street, and 80 Wooster Street, to name only a few. In its very last phase, leading up to (and in fact briefly overlapping with) the creation of Anthology, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque held weekly (Tuesday) screenings at the Jewish Museum, from November 1968 to December 1970. The Jewish Museum screenings came about thanks to the good graces of the Jewish Museum’s Director at the time, Karl Katz, on whose watch the Museum had been presenting adventurous programming which caught Jonas’s eye, and inspired him to propose a collaboration. The Cinematheque programming that took place over the course of those years is, from today’s perspective, an intriguing mixture of filmmakers and films that would soon be effectively canonized as part of the nascent Anthology Film Archives’ “Essential Cinema” collection, as well as numerous other filmmakers who are little-known and rarely-screened today. Renewing our collaboration with the Jewish Museum more than fifty years after the final Film-Makers’ Cinematheque program, Anthology will present a series of screenings throughout May that will (as much as possible) recreate a selection of the Cinematheque programs that took place there in 1968-70. These programs focus on filmmakers who were notably omitted from the Essential Cinema cycle, demonstrating the breadth of programming presented by the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque, as well as the extraordinary vitality of the experimental film scene of the time. “Fortunate circumstances brought the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque and its avant-garde program to the Jewish Museum. Jonas Mekas, the Lithuanian filmmaker who ran the program, had held screenings somewhat peripatetically for five years. Mekas, who had spent time in a Nazi war camp during World War II, had been kicked out of several public auditoriums, arrested for his films’ violation of obscenity laws, and was often in financial hardship. In 1968 he was – once again – without a space. Mekas knew of the Jewish Museum’s recent penchant for edgy programming and thought it worth asking us: Could there be room for his films at the Jewish Museum? I was glad to provide a forum for Mekas’s cutting-edge program. We had a space that was dark most nights of the week; what was the harm? I often stopped by the screenings on my way out of the building, but rarely stayed long. He said that the films he showed focused on the ‘poetry rather than prose’ of cinema…which meant largely black-and-white, non-narrative films. I tried to watch, but the sputtering images mostly reminded me of something getting stuck in a sprocket. Call me crass, but I liked color. And a story. But even if these poetic films weren’t my cup of tea, I was happy to host the program, which brought a throng of downtown artists to the Upper East Side every week.” –Karl Katz, THE EXHIBITIONIST: LIVING MUSEUMS, LOVING MUSEUMS This series is co-presented by Anthology Film Archives and the Jewish Museum. The Jewish Museum’s exhibition, “Jonas Mekas: The Camera Was Always Running”, is on view through June 5, 2022; for more info visit: https://thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/jonas-mekas-the-camera-was-always-running. Jewish Museum Members will be able to purchase tickets for these screenings at Anthology’s $7 discounted rate. Special thanks to Kelly Taxter, Jenna Weiss, Nelly Benedek, and Kristina Parsons (Jewish Museum); as well as to Neelon Crawford, Nathaniel Dorsky, Sebastian Mekas, Michael Mideke, Robert Polidori, Michael Snow, Jo Hayward-Haines & Tim Haines, Jesse Brossoit (CFMDC), Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema), and MM Serra (Film-Makers’ Coop). March 25, 1969: JOYCE WIELAND Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. PROGRAM 2: 1933 (1967, 4 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) “The year? The number? The title? Was it (the film) made then? It’s a memory! (i.e., a Film). No, it’s many memories. It’s so sad and funny: the departed, departing people, cars, street! It hurries, it’s gone, it’s back! It’s the only glimpse we have but we can have it again. The film (of 1933?) was made in 1967. You find out, if you didn’t already know, how naming tints pure vision.” –Michael Snow SAILBOAT (1967, 3 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) “A toy-like image of a sailboat sails, without interruption on the water, to the sound of roaring waves, which seem to underline the image to the point of exaggeration, somewhat in the way a child might draw a picture of water and write word-sounds on it to make it as emphatic as possible.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE CAT FOOD (1967, 13.5 min, 16mm) “A cat eats its methodical way through a polymorphous fish. The projector devours the ribbon of film at the same rate, methodically. The lay of Grimnir mentions a wild boar whose magical flesh was nightly devoured by the heroes of Valhalla, and miraculously regenerated next morning in the kitchen. The fish in Wieland’s film, and the miraculous flesh of the film itself, are reconstructed on the rewinds to be devoured again. Here is a dionysian metaphor, old as the West, of immense strength. Once we see that the fish is the protagonist of the action, this metaphor reverberates to incandescence in the mind.” –Hollis Frampton HANDTINTING (1967-68, 6 min, 16mm, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) “HANDTINTING is the apt title of a film made from outtakes from a Job Corps documentary which features hand-tinted sections. The film is full of small movements and actions, gestures begun and never completed. Repeated images, sometimes in colour, sometimes not. A beautifully realized type of chamber-music film whose sum-total feeling is ritualistic.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968, 16 min, 16mm) “The film is witty, articulate, and a far cry from all the other cute animal humanism the cinema has sickened us with in the past. Nevertheless it is a vital extension of the aspect of her films that runs counter to the structural principle: ironic symbolism.” –P. Adams Sitney, FILM CULTURE DRIPPING WATER (1969, 10.5 min, 16mm. Co-directed with Michael Snow.) “You see nothing but a white, crystal white plate, and water dripping into the plate, from the ceiling, from high, and you hear the sound of the water dripping. […] Snow and Wieland’s film uplifts the object, and leaves the viewer with a finer attitude toward the world around him; it opens his eyes to the phenomenal world. And how can you love people if you don’t love water, stone, grass.” –Jonas Mekas Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Tuesday 24, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 3: Reason Over Passion

Joyce Wieland, Program 3: Reason Over Passion

Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. PROGRAM 3: REASON OVER PASSION/LA RAISON AVANT LA PASSION (A MEDITATION OF THE CANADA OF PIERRE TRUDEAU) (1969, 84 min, 16mm) “Joyce Wieland’s rarely screened 1969 masterpiece is a neglected landmark of avant-garde film. Taking the form of a cross-country trip on the Trans-Canada Highway, a mostly two-lane road that snakes through forests and mountain ranges, it affords views very different from those offered by U.S. interstates. The sameness of a road trip – the way all windshield views begin to look alike – is modified by a feeling of openness, as Wieland joins images not to fuse two parts of the land but to suggest the unseen spaces between them. Superimposed on the landscapes are anagrams of the phrase ‘la raison avant la passion,’ taken from a speech by Canada’s former prime minister Pierre Trudeau. But the poetic quality of the landscapes seems to argue for passion over reason, as does Wieland’s playful rearranging of the letters. At the same time, the systematic way the letters are shifted suggests a rational method, and the film is sincere enough to take the prime minister seriously.” –Fred Camper, CHICAGO READER “REASON OVER PASSION, then, is Joyce Wieland’s major film so far. With its many eccentricities, it is a glyph of her artistic personality; a lyric vision tempered by an aggressive form, and a visionary patriotism mixed with ironic self-parody. It is a film to be seen many times.” –P. Adams Sitney, FILM CULTURE “This film is about the pain and joy of living in a very large space: in fact, in a continent. It is painful, because such an experience distends the mind, it seems too large for passionate reason to contain. It is joyous, because ‘true patriot love,’ a reasonable passion, can contain it, after all. But what is remarkable, for me, is that all its urgency is lucidly caught, bound as it were chemically, in the substance of film itself, requiring no exterior argument.” –Hollis Frampton

Thursday 26, May

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Joyce Wieland, Program 4

Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. PROGRAM 4: PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972, 32.5 min, 16mm. In French with English subtitles.) A film about a Quebec revolutionary who spent three years in jail without trial. The film was made in April, 1972, when Pierre was working with workers, raising consciousness, in Mount Laurier, Quebec. “Everything which happened is recorded on film. It was a one-shot affair, I either got him on film or I missed. What we see on film is the mouth of a revolutionary, extremely close, his lips, his teeth, his spittle, his tongue which rolls so beautifully through his French, and finally the reflections in his teeth of the window behind me.” –Joyce Wieland SOLIDARITY (1973, 11 min, 16mm) A film on the Dare strike of the early 1970s. Hundreds of feet and legs, milling, marching and picketing with the word “solidarity” superimposed on the screen. The soundtrack comprises an organizer’s speech on the labor situation. SOLIDARITY combines a political awareness, an aesthetic viewpoint, and a sense of humor unique in Wieland’s work. A AND B IN ONTARIO (1984, 16 min, 16mm. Co-directed with Hollis Frampton.) A AND B IN ONTARIO was completed 18 years after the original material was shot. After Frampton’s death, the film was assembled by Wieland into a cinematic dialogue in which the collaborators (in the spirit of the 1960s) shoot each other with cameras. BIRDS AT SUNRISE (1986, 10 min, 16mm) “The film was originally photographed in 1972. Birds from my window were filmed during the winter, through to the spring, with the early morning light. I became caught up in their frozen world and their ability to survive the bitter cold. I welcomed their chirps and their songs which offered life and hope for spring.” –Joyce Wieland Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Sunday 22, May

Thursday 26, May

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Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Joyce Wieland, Program 5

Joyce Wieland is one of the most important Canadian artists and filmmakers of the second half of the 20th century, but her work has not been showcased in its entirety in New York City for many years. Anthology aims to redress that oversight with this comprehensive retrospective, which brings together virtually all of her pioneering short and feature films. Wieland began making films in Toronto in the 1950s at the animation studio, Graphic Associates, which had been co-founded by George Dunning, and where she worked alongside other artists including the young Michael Snow. Wieland and Snow soon married and moved to New York City in 1962, becoming integral parts of the experimental film and art scenes of the time, and producing some of the key filmic works of the era, such as Snow’s NEW YORK EYE AND EAR CONTROL (1964), WAVELENGTH (1967), and <---> (BACK AND FORTH) (1969), and Wieland’s CAT FOOD (1967), RAT LIFE AND DIET IN NORTH AMERICA (1968), and REASON OVER PASSION (1969). Her sojourn in the U.S. awakened a deep sense of Canadian national identity, and following her split with Snow and her return to Canada in 1971, this became increasingly reflected in her work, culminating in films like PIERRE VALLIÈRES (1972) and her ambitious narrative feature, THE FAR SHORE (1976). The negative reception afforded that last film brought her cinematic career largely to a close (though she did collaborate with Hollis Frampton in 1984 on A AND B IN ONTARIO, and in 1986 completed a film she had shot earlier, BIRDS AT SUNRISE). She remained prolific and widely celebrated as an artist, however – working largely in the realms of collage, assemblage, and quilt-making – until her death in 1998. “[Wieland’s] early celebrations of female sexuality, women’s domestic environment and her challenges to patriarchal representations of Canadian national identity made her an innovator in various media. As a filmmaker, her distinctive use of extreme close-ups, disjunctive editing, repetition, irony and text extended the medium’s expressive possibilities. From the experimental films made during her New York years in the mid to late 1960s…to the political documentaries completed after her return to Canada in 1971, PIERRE VALLIÈRES and SOLIDARITY, and the release of her theatrical feature in 1975, THE FAR SHORE, her work has been commended by writers representing the critical spectrum. Wieland has been acclaimed as an underground filmmaker, a political activist, a formalist, a Canadian nationalist, a postmodernist and a radical feminist. While a testament to the films’ complexity, richness and ongoing appeal, Wieland resisted this type of theoretical labeling; she resented its restrictive influence and failure to acknowledge the personal impetus for the work.” –Kathryn Elder, THE FILMS OF JOYCE WIELAND “Joyce Wieland makes a very special kind of film. The same sense of humor, tenderness and feeling for the more humble details of life that is present in her paintings and plastic constructions are given further dimensions in her films. There is somewhat of a sense of sadness and nostalgia in all her work…a sense of lost innocence.” –Robert Cowan, TAKE ONE Filmmaker, scholar, and curator Kay Armatage, who directed ARTIST ON FIRE: THE WORK OF JOYCE WIELAND (1987), and has written extensively on Canadian cinema and on Wieland’s work in particular, will be here in person during the retrospective to introduce selected screenings! This retrospective is co-presented with the Consulate General of Canada in New York; special thanks to Catherine Scheinman. PROGRAM 5: THE FAR SHORE (1976, 105 min, 16mm) Set in 1918, Ontario. Eulalie, a Québecoise, marries a Toronto engineer but finds life with him oppressive. She falls in love with Tom, a painter who is an acquaintance of her husband’s and, with him, escapes briefly to Northern Ontario before they are hunted down by her jealous husband. “For something like two decades, Joyce Wieland – the Toronto painter, filmmaker, quiltmaker and lay ecologist – has been creating an individual sensibility and then displaying it, piece by piece, in the various art forms that have suited her purposes. In THE FAR SHORE, her feature film, she articulates that sensibility in detail for the first time…. THE FAR SHORE has energy, ambition, vision and a marvellously confident sense of itself.” –Marshall Delaney

Sunday 22, May

Wednesday 25, May

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Mono No Aware Community Screening PGM

Mono No Aware Community Screening PGM

Featuring the world premiere of films made locally with the support of MONO in April 2022. This program will include films made through the educational initiatives of MONO NO AWARE, a cinema-arts nonprofit organization and film positive community working to promote connectivity through the cinematic experience. Established in 2007 and based in downtown Brooklyn, MONO NO AWARE presents monthly artist-in-person screenings, facilitates equipment rentals, operates a film distribution initiative, maintains wet & dry lab facilities, and hosts an annual exhibition for contemporary artists and international filmmakers whose work incorporates Super-8mm, 16mm, 35mm, or altered light projections as part of a live performance or installation. For more info visit: www.mononoawarefilm.com

Sunday 29, May

Mr. Freedom

Mr. Freedom

by William Klein 1968, 92 min, 35mm. In English & French with English subtitles. “William Klein’s over-the-top fantasy-satire is conceivably the most anti-American movie ever made, but only an American (albeit an expatriate living in France) could have made it. […] Filmed in slam-bang comic-book style, it describes the exploits of a heroic, myopic, and knuckleheaded free-world agent (PLAYTIME’s John Abbey) who arrives in Paris to do battle against the Russian and Chinese communists, embodied by Moujik Man (a colossal cossack padded out with foam rubber) and the inflatable Red China Man (a dragon that fills an entire metro station). Donald Pleasence is the hero’s sinister, LBJ-like boss, and Delphine Seyrig at her giddiest plays the sexy, duplicitous double agent who shows him the ropes. Done in a Punch and Judy manner that occasionally suggests Godard or Kubrick, and combining guerrilla-style documentary with expressionism, this feisty political cartoon remains a singular expression of 60s irreverence.” –Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER

Saturday 4, June

Monday 6, June

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Nam June Paik's Radical Fun

Nam June Paik's Radical Fun

Since the early 1960s, Nam June Paik’s prescient thinking about how artists can exploit television and computer technology has resonated through the generations, particularly with regard to his mischievous opposition to industry conformity. His deep belief in the radical potential of fun, and his understanding of technological innovation as nurturing artistic innovation, have remained relevant through profound changes in communication platforms. This program – a co-presentation by Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) and Gagosian – brings together a selection of Paik’s analog video works with Internet-era works by artists engaging the same spirit, highlighting their shared strategy of playfully deploying commercial technologies to produce their own experimental work.

Thursday 30, June

New or Unseen Films Selected by Michael Snow

New or Unseen Films Selected by Michael Snow

This spring the Jewish Museum presents “Jonas Mekas: The Camera Was Always Running”, a major exhibition celebrating the centenary of filmmaker, poet, artist, and Anthology Film Archives co-founder Jonas Mekas. This new exhibition, however, does not represent the first intersection between Jonas, the Jewish Museum, and the realm of cinema that Anthology was founded to preserve and present. From 1963-70, Mekas and his collaborators organized dozens and dozens of experimental film programs, under the auspices of an organization that was known briefly as the Film-Maker’s Showcase before adopting its permanent name, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque. A roving screening series, which was in some ways a kind of precursor to Anthology, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque hopped from venue to venue frequently during the course of its existence, with residencies at the New Yorker Theater, the Astor Place Playhouse, 125 West 41st Street, and 80 Wooster Street, to name only a few. In its very last phase, leading up to (and in fact briefly overlapping with) the creation of Anthology, the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque held weekly (Tuesday) screenings at the Jewish Museum, from November 1968 to December 1970. The Jewish Museum screenings came about thanks to the good graces of the Jewish Museum’s Director at the time, Karl Katz, on whose watch the Museum had been presenting adventurous programming which caught Jonas’s eye, and inspired him to propose a collaboration. The Cinematheque programming that took place over the course of those years is, from today’s perspective, an intriguing mixture of filmmakers and films that would soon be effectively canonized as part of the nascent Anthology Film Archives’ “Essential Cinema” collection, as well as numerous other filmmakers who are little-known and rarely-screened today. Renewing our collaboration with the Jewish Museum more than fifty years after the final Film-Makers’ Cinematheque program, Anthology will present a series of screenings throughout May that will (as much as possible) recreate a selection of the Cinematheque programs that took place there in 1968-70. These programs focus on filmmakers who were notably omitted from the Essential Cinema cycle, demonstrating the breadth of programming presented by the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque, as well as the extraordinary vitality of the experimental film scene of the time. “Fortunate circumstances brought the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque and its avant-garde program to the Jewish Museum. Jonas Mekas, the Lithuanian filmmaker who ran the program, had held screenings somewhat peripatetically for five years. Mekas, who had spent time in a Nazi war camp during World War II, had been kicked out of several public auditoriums, arrested for his films’ violation of obscenity laws, and was often in financial hardship. In 1968 he was – once again – without a space. Mekas knew of the Jewish Museum’s recent penchant for edgy programming and thought it worth asking us: Could there be room for his films at the Jewish Museum? I was glad to provide a forum for Mekas’s cutting-edge program. We had a space that was dark most nights of the week; what was the harm? I often stopped by the screenings on my way out of the building, but rarely stayed long. He said that the films he showed focused on the ‘poetry rather than prose’ of cinema…which meant largely black-and-white, non-narrative films. I tried to watch, but the sputtering images mostly reminded me of something getting stuck in a sprocket. Call me crass, but I liked color. And a story. But even if these poetic films weren’t my cup of tea, I was happy to host the program, which brought a throng of downtown artists to the Upper East Side every week.” –Karl Katz, THE EXHIBITIONIST: LIVING MUSEUMS, LOVING MUSEUMS This series is co-presented by Anthology Film Archives and the Jewish Museum. The Jewish Museum’s exhibition, “Jonas Mekas: The Camera Was Always Running”, is on view through June 5, 2022; for more info visit: https://thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/jonas-mekas-the-camera-was-always-running. Jewish Museum Members will be able to purchase tickets for these screenings at Anthology’s $7 discounted rate. Special thanks to Kelly Taxter, Jenna Weiss, Nelly Benedek, and Kristina Parsons (Jewish Museum); as well as to Neelon Crawford, Nathaniel Dorsky, Sebastian Mekas, Michael Mideke, Robert Polidori, Michael Snow, Jo Hayward-Haines & Tim Haines, Jesse Brossoit (CFMDC), Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema), and MM Serra (Film-Makers’ Coop). September 23, 1969: A PROGRAM OF NEW OR UNSEEN FILMS SELECTED BY MICHAEL SNOW Paul Haines AN ALL-ETHNIC ELECTRIC PROGRAM (1966, 25 min, 16mm-to-digital) “Perhaps the first ‘absolute’ sound film. A curious but very beautiful work.” –David Curtis, EXPERIMENTAL FILM Jack Chambers CIRCLE (1969, 28 min, 16mm) “A profoundly meditative film, CIRCLE explores many of Chambers’s central themes: the life cycle, the effects of light, domesticity, and transcendence through everyday experience. For this film Chambers, fiercely single-minded about his art, knocked a hole through the back wall of his home on Lombard Avenue in London and mounted a movie camera. Each day for a year, he would turn it on for a few seconds, recording ‘blindly’ whatever the lens saw. The result is a mesmerizing sequence of diurnal change, seasonal shifts, and the ephemera of family life. As its title suggests, CIRCLE is complete and perfect in its form.” –Mark A. Cheetham, JACK CHAMBERS: LIFE & WORK Robert Huot SPRAY (1967, 11.5 min, 16mm, silent) “An extraordinary ebbing and flowing, dotting and pulsing ‘abstract’ field film. The filmmaker-painter Huot painted this film by spray painting a 12-minute length of clear film. When projected this single gesture contains a fascinating atomized space.” –Michael Snow Hollis Frampton CARROTS AND PEAS (1969, 5.5 min, 16mm) CARROTS AND PEAS goes through its little vocabulary of images; the language is there as a kind of empty sign of the distraction of the lecturing voice, which, if you’re actually looking at the images, goes in one ear and out the other. Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Tuesday 31, May

New Red Order

New Red Order

New Red Order NEVER SETTLE: THE PROGRAM 2018-ongoing, 50 min, digital This promotional initiation video lures inductees with promises of decolonization and settler remediation. Imagery of settler-led planetary destruction is juxtaposed with sequences of underground group therapy sessions where settlers can lose, forget, and explore their identities in order to indigenize. Sharing their labor, lurking through museums and institutions, future accomplices snap thousands of cellphone pictures of every artifact and artwork on hand. Deploying and containing confrontational representations around the stakes of accompliceship, the video examines the dynamics influencing the conditions in which the concerns of indigenous people are often treated as a topic du jour and then co-opted by non-indigenous people, alongside the search for ways to make amends. Preceded by: Adam Khalil, Bayley Sweitzer, and Anton Vidokle A I O U 2019, 30 min, digital The distant future. An orbital facility of unknown origin. Here, the debt of taking a life will be finally repaid…through resurrection. The victims of military violence across time are systematically brought back to life and guided through the all-too-familiar facility. As a staff of identical ushers draws back layers of confusion and pain, the freshly resurrected gradually become aware of the reality of their corporeal reinsertion: perhaps the world of the living is not a world at all; to be alive in this place may merely be an exhibit. We, the resurrected, overwhelmed by a literal second life, will of course discover our one inevitable destination: a place to sit, have a drink, and talk it out.

Friday 10, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 1: Leonor Teles

PROGRAM 1: Leonor Teles ASHORE 2018, 80 min, DCP Leonor Teles returns to her birthplace in Vila Franca de Xira, on the outskirts of Lisbon, to make a documentary on the life of Albertino Lobo, a fisherman living a modest life by the Tagus River who waits for new permits to continue working. Shot in the aftermath of Portugal’s biggest economic crisis in decades, ASHORE is a delicate look at the lives of those who long to continue to live – through their work, with their family, or in a marriage. Teles films the passage of time with care and tenderness (and the help of Nat King Cole and Otis Redding), bringing an authentic, immediate depiction of lives that are too often sensationalized onscreen. Preceded by: Leonor Teles BATRACHIAN’S BALLAD (2016, 11 min, DCP) Fable-like Super-8mm images from a time when creatures lived in harmony and peace are haunted by a tale of a frog’s suicide, struck by the rage and sadness of being ostracized by other beings. BATRACHIAN’S BALLAD then brings documentary footage of the director walking unannounced into stores to take hold of ceramic frogs – meant to ward off Romani people like herself – before breaking them on the floor and running away with her crew. A political, punk-rock manifesto awarded with the Golden Bear at the Berlinale. Leonor Teles DOGS BARKING AT BIRDS (2019, 20 min, DCP) As his family fights eviction, Vicente wanders around the gentrified streets of Porto looking for an apartment big enough for himself, his siblings, and their mother. Leonor Teles takes inspiration from a real-life story and films non-actors recreating their lives on screen, showing an urban scenery as inviting for tourists as it is oppressive to those who struggle to make ends meet. Total running time: ca. 115 min.

Friday 24, June

Wednesday 29, June

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Portuguese Cinema Prog. 2: Damned Summer

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 2: Damned Summer

Pedro Cabeleira DAMNED SUMMER 2017, 128 min, DCP Pedro Cabeleira was still a student at the Lisbon Film and Theatre School when he shot DAMNED SUMMER with the help of other alumni, eventually working with young filmmakers who would define a new generation in Portuguese cinema (including Leonor Teles, whose skills as a director of photography are on display here). More than that, DAMNED SUMMER is a portrait of the new nightlife culture in Lisbon – of semi-improvised gatherings in new urban spaces where electronic music, drugs, and the extension of time (much like the experience of coming together in a cinema) act as a hypnotic counterweight for an austere reality.

Saturday 25, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 3

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 3

Laura Carreira THE SHIFT (2020, 9 min, DCP) Inspired by British social realism, Laura Carreira shows the dramatic effect of an unpredictable change in someone’s routine – losing a day’s shift while making difficult choices on an ordinary supermarket trip. An honest, remarkable portrait of the struggle of temporary workers contending with the loss of security and dignity. Susana Nobre JACK’S RIDE 2020, 70 min, DCP As a member of the Terratreme collective (the group of filmmakers and producers behind THE NOTHING FACTORY), Susana Nobre has been one of the most vocal defenders of using cinema to question labor and social relationships. In JACK’S RIDE, a tender, delicate, and humorous docufiction, Nobre asks Joaquim, an unemployed 63-year-old man, to reminisce and recreate his former life as a taxi driver and immigrant in the U.S. from his native town in Portugal. João Rosas MARIA DO MAR 2015, 34 min, DCP A proficient editor (namely of Susana Nobre’s socially-engaged films) as well as a director, João Rosas has been carrying the influence of Eric Rohmer into new Portuguese cinema. MARIA DO MAR is the coming-of-age story of an adolescent who spends his summer vacations with a group of young adults. Teenage lust, an Italian pop song, and strange advice from a haunting grandfatherly figure will set the tone for his first summer crush: Maria do Mar, a mysterious young woman who attracts his curious, innocent gaze. Total running time: ca. 120 min.

Saturday 25, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 4

Duarte Coimbra AMOR, AVENIDAS NOVAS (2018, 20 min, DCP) Produced by the Lisbon Film and Theatre School and premiered at Cannes’ Critics Week, AMOR, AVENIDAS NOVAS is one of the strongest examples of Miguel Gomes’s influence on a new generation of filmmakers. Duarte Coimbra films Lisbon’s swift gentrification by following a young man looking for a place to crash with his only possession – a blue mattress. A meeting with a young woman working in a film crew and musical moments inspired by 80s pop will give life to a city that no longer seems like a place for dreaming. Tomás Paula Marques BLINDMAN’S BUFF (2021, 16 min, DCP) BLINDMAN’S BUFF is the tale of two siblings, a group of bullies, and a dangerous night out that seems haunted by ghosts of the past – a mystical yet realistic portrait of love and survival against hatred for gender-nonconforming bodies. Tomás Paula Marques IN CASE OF FIRE (2019, 23 min, DCP) Paula Marques films the growing angst of a young man and the peer pressure from his group of friends while hunting in the countryside and engaging in masculinity contests. A remarkable tale of a boy physically and mentally constrained by closeted desire, haunted by a hate crime committed against a close friend. David Pinheiro Vicente WHERE THE SUMMER GOES (CHAPTERS ON YOUTH) (2018, 21 min, DCP) A group of friends rides together in a tiny car on a scorchingly hot day, heading to an isolated spot by the water. When it’s too hot to talk, silent body language speaks behind sweaty gazes. A bloody wound incites fear and desire over a snake’s surreptitious movement between two enamored bodies. David Pinheiro Vicente THE LAMB OF GOD (2020, 15 min, DCP) David Pinheiro Vicente films another tale of desire and violence – now under the spell of religious festivities in a Portuguese village – and captures the tension between different age groups in a small family. A tense, sensual film on the dangerous confluences between childhood, adulthood, reality, and fantasy. Catarina de Sousa & Nick Tyson TRACING UTOPIA (2021, 27 min, DCP) An epidemic may stop reality, but not our dreams. Catarina de Sousa and Nick Tyson let a group of queer teenagers from Queens talk about a better world while playing Minecraft and building a universe that transcends time and hate. A film-manifesto that reflects past struggles and leads us into a universe filled with peace, love, and understanding. Or is that life on Mars? Produced as part of the UnionDocs Collaborative Studio 2019-2020. Total running time: ca. 130 min.

Sunday 26, June

Thursday 30, June

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Portuguese Cinema Prog. 5: Rio Corgo

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 5: Rio Corgo

Maya Kosa & Sérgio da Costa RIO CORGO 2015, 95 min, DCP An old drifter who wouldn’t be out of place in a surrealist Hollywood western, Mr. Silva lives in an abandoned house in a cold, remote Portuguese village, hiding past stories as a shepherd, clown, magician, and gardener. All locals avoid him except Ana, a young woman fascinated by the ghosts that seem to haunt this solitary figure. As Mr. Silva leads us towards his death, Maya Kosa and Sérgio da Costa film a bigger-than-life character who seems to transform the world around him. Preceded by: Cristèle Alves Meia INVISIBLE HERO (2019, 27 min, DCP) Duarte is a solitary 50-year-old blind man looking for his friend Leandro – a Cape Verdean immigrant no one seems to know about. Frustrating as his daily walks may seem, Duarte chats with people enraptured by his engaging personality. A woman takes him by the hand at night and offers him a moment of musical delight and seduction – much like Duarte’s fantastic visions of love and friendship. Total running time: ca. 130 min.

Sunday 26, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 6: Bostofrio

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 6: Bostofrio

Paulo Carneiro BOSTOFRIO 2018, 70 min, DCP Paulo Carneiro takes a small crew to a remote village in Northern Portugal to find out who his biological father is – someone he knows only through secrets and tales filled with angst and pain. As he converses with family and friends, BOSTOFRIO develops into a remarkable documentary about trauma, illness, and their extraordinary embodiments in a land seemingly haunted by a devilish presence. Preceded by: Pedro Peralta ASCENSION (2016, 17 min, DCP) An extraordinary tour-de-force, ASCENSION is a near one-shot film – an illusion as striking as the human operation of a group of peasants who save a young man’s body from a well. Religious symbolism in Peralta’s frames and João Ribeiro’s Tarkovskian cinematography suggest more than a life-saving operation – perhaps a resurrection from poverty and political oppression in people who long to be free. Diogo Salgado THROUGH THE HAZE (2020, 14 min, DCP) Two boys play by a lake in the woods before the sun comes down. As darkness surrounds them, one of them disappears, turning the night into a silent, dangerous adventure for a young boy looking for his friend. The night welcomes childhood’s curious gaze and lets its imagination paint a dark, moving canvas that echoes nature’s eerie sounds. Total running time: ca. 101 min.

Monday 27, June

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 7

Portuguese Cinema Prog. 7

Catarina Vasconcelos METAPHOR OR SADNESS INSIDE OUT 2013, 32 min, digital Prior to the widely successful THE METAMORPHOSIS OF BIRDS, Catarina Vasconcelos directed this film, a moving, intimate look at her parents’ love story and a tale tragically cut short by her mother’s premature death. Personal and political memories become one in a daughter’s quest for her family story, lending a tender perspective on her parents’ love and activism in defending the Portuguese 1974 revolution’s ideals. Aya Koretzky AROUND THE WORLD WHEN YOU WERE MY AGE 2018, 110 min, DCP Aya Koretzky takes us through a life journey in AROUND THE WORLD WHEN YOU WERE MY AGE, filming her Japanese father as he narrates his youthful travels throughout the U.S., the Soviet Union, Africa, and Europe, before settling down in Portugal. Koretzky turns an introspective, poetic gaze on an incredible life story, surrounding her father with photographs and maps and extending his presence to his wondrous garden and the immense sky above him. Total running time: ca. 150 min.

Tuesday 28, June

Regrouping

Regrouping

AFA PRESERVATION! When Anthology restored Lizzie Borden’s underground classic, BORN IN FLAMES, in 2016, we screened it alongside an archival 16mm print of her little-known, long-unscreened debut feature, the experimental documentary REGROUPING (1976), a fascinating film that shares with BORN IN FLAMES (1983) a profoundly innovative spirit and a deep commitment to transformational politics and social exploration. With its boldly unconventional form and its radically self-questioning approach to nonfiction cinema, Borden’s first film was a revelation and was soon thereafter reclaimed as a “lost feminist classic.” Now, six years later, it’s REGROUPING’s turn to take the spotlight, with a week of screenings of Anthology’s brand-new 16mm restoration. Alongside the new restoration we’ll present encore screenings of BORN IN FLAMES, as well as rare 35mm screenings of her equally accomplished follow-up, WORKING GIRLS (1986). Lizzie Borden will be here in person for selected screenings, alongside other special guests! Details to be announced soon. Lizzie Borden REGROUPING (1976, 80 min, 16mm. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation, with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation. Special thanks to Outfest UCLA Legacy Project, Colorlab, and Audio Mechanics.) For her first feature film, Lizzie Borden collaborated with a small feminist group of four white middle class women in New York in the 1970s. Her intention was to explore their thoughts and ideas as well as the dynamics that animated their relationships and discussions. Adopting a radically experimental approach to nonfiction filmmaking, Borden combined interactions with the women themselves, dramatized sequences made in collaboration with the group, and interviews with other women in their orbit, such as artist Joan Jonas. Even more unusually, and especially as the group’s attitude towards the film project grew increasingly contentious, Borden incorporated their responses (and others’) to various in-progress versions of the film itself, creating a kind of socio-filmic feedback loop that foregrounds and transcends many of the intrinsic limitations of the documentary form. Despite these attempts to engage with and incorporate their criticisms, the women in the group continued to take issue with and protest the film following its completion. Three of the women (the fourth had passed away during production) picketed the film’s initial screenings in 1976 (which took place at Anthology, and at the Edinburgh International Film Festival). Borden soon withdrew the film from circulation, and it languished virtually unseen for 40 years, until Anthology revived it on the occasion of our preservation of BORN IN FLAMES in 2016. Despite this tumultuous production and exhibition history, REGROUPING is an extraordinary film: a clear-eyed, tough-minded contribution to feminist thought, a still provocative exploration of female experience, group dynamics, and political work, and a fascinating attempt to rethink the conventions, methodology, and possibilities of documentary cinema. “Borden’s debut is as much about the splintering of a group as it is the breakdown of the filmmaking process itself. The meta-conceit leads to a destabilizing, but always fascinating, experience for the spectator. […] [T]he tensions, arising within the film and without, prove instructive, not destructive: REGROUPING illuminates both the liberating and confining possibilities of the credo ‘the personal is political’ – the rallying cry of second-wave feminism – in a way that few other works from that era ever dared.” –Melissa Anderson, VILLAGE VOICE “Borden confronted the whole issue of cinematic voyeurism straight on by making a film that is unabashedly voyeuristic as hell.” –B. Ruby Rich, “Chick Flicks: Theories and Memories of the Feminist Film Movement”

Friday 27, May

Saturday 28, May

Sunday 29, May

Monday 30, May

Tuesday 31, May

Wednesday 1, June

Thursday 2, June

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The Model Couple

The Model Couple

by William Klein In French with English subtitles, 1977, 101 min, 35mm. Archival print courtesy of the Walker Art Center. (LE COUPLE TÉMOIN) In 1977 France, the Ministry of the Future chooses two “normal,” white, middle-class citizens, Claudine (Anémone) and Jean-Michel (André Dussolier), for a national experiment. They will be monitored and displayed on television for six months in a model apartment outfitted with state-of-the-art products and nonstop surveillance – the template for “a new city for the new man.” A searing satire of the breakdown of individual freedoms in the face of increasing governmental invasions of privacy, THE MODEL COUPLE deftly investigates the fine line between democracy and totalitarianism.

Saturday 4, June

Sunday 5, June

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Vision Fest Program 1

Vision Fest Program 1

William Hooker THE LOST GENERATION: OUTSIDE THE MAINSTREAM 2021, 107 min, digital This film is an effort to elaborate on the history of the many musicians of the 1970s whose music has gone unrecognized by a larger audience. Most of these artists have international followings and continue to perform, record, and document their art and their lives. Some of the musicians, entrepreneurs and listeners featured in the documentary include Michael Thomson, Ken Filiano, Larry Roland, Ras Moshe, Ted Daniel, Dick Griffin, On Davis, Steve Dalachinsky, Craig Harris, Hilliard Greene, Michael Dorf, Richard Berger, William Parker, Sarah Manning, Steve Swell, Newman Baker, Iconoclast, Patricia Parker, Jackson Krall, Andrew Lamb, Marc Edwards, and many more.

Sunday 19, June

Vision Fest Program 2

Vision Fest Program 2

Bryan Dematteis THE BLACK ARTISTS’ GROUP: CREATION EQUALS MOVEMENT 2022, 49 min, digital This documentary delves into the history and legacy of the Black Artists’ Group (BAG), which formed in St. Louis in the late 1960s as an arts collective devoted to raising Black consciousness, battling social injustice, and exploring the far reaches of experimental performance. Growing out of the Black Arts Movement, BAG was distinguished by a unique blending of music, poetry, drama, dance, and the visual arts. Through its interdisciplinary approach, BAG addressed many of the day’s most pressing social issues and brought awareness to the struggles faced by Black city residents. Beyond St. Louis, BAG’s musicians became influential in Europe and in New York, where members helped to found the Loft Jazz scene. Although BAG’s life in St. Louis was brief, several of its number, including Oliver Lake and Julius Hemphill, have gone on to impressive careers as experimental jazz players. Locally, the group’s spirit lives on in the many St. Louis musicians who cut their chops learning to play in BAG’s community arts classes. Through rare archival footage and interviews with the collective’s key players, BLACK ARTISTS’ GROUP: CREATION EQUALS MOVEMENT shines a light on this untold St. Louis story of passion, creative vision, and community. Among those featured in the film are Lake, Hemphill, Charles “Bobo” Shaw, Malinke Elliott, Hamiet Bluiett, J.D. Parran, Portia Hunt, Shirley LeFlore, George Sams, Percy Green II, Patricia Cruz, Ben Looker, and Dennis Owsley. Tayo Giwa THE SUN RISES IN THE EAST 2022, 58 min, digital. Produced by Cynthia Gordy Giwa. THE SUN RISES IN THE EAST chronicles the birth, rise, and legacy of The East, a pan-African cultural organization founded in 1969 by teens and young adults in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Led by educator Jitu Weusi, The East embodied Black self-determination, building its own school, food co-op, newsmagazine, and more than a dozen other institutions. The organization hosted world-famous jazz musicians at its performance venue, and it served as an epicenter for contemporaries such as the Black Panther Party and the Young Lords. In effect, The East built an independent Black nation in the heart of Central Brooklyn. The film also examines challenges that led to the organization’s dissolution, including government surveillance, its gender politics, and financial struggles. Featuring interviews with leaders of The East and people who grew up in the organization as children, THE SUN RISES IN THE EAST delivers an exhilarating vision of just how much is possible.

Monday 20, June

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

by William Klein 1966, 101 min, 35mm “Acclaimed for being ‘ten years ahead of its time’ by Stanley Kubrick, Klein’s iconic first fiction film marks the end of a decade in which he made his name as the most subversive photographer at American Vogue. His scathing satire of Parisian haute couture hinges on Polly Maggoo, a neophyte supermodel from Brooklyn who proclaims, ‘Everything is fashion. Love, ideas, even war. Even politics!’ The audacious production design adds to the film’s delirious glamour as much as it serves to savage a world for which such conceits of style are a primary target. Not unlike Peter Watkins’s PRIVILEGE from the following year, POLLY MAGGOO targets the co-option and commercialization of a newly booming youth culture, skewering its freedoms and pretensions as much as the media frenzy which encouraged them. Klein’s pseudovérité twist on the emerging genre of confessional television reveals his uncanny clarity at understanding the fusion of pop and politics that defined the late 1960s.” –TATE MODERN

Friday 3, June

Sunday 5, June

Monday 6, June

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Working Girls

Working Girls

When Anthology restored Lizzie Borden’s underground classic, BORN IN FLAMES, in 2016, we screened it alongside an archival 16mm print of her little-known, long-unscreened debut feature, the experimental documentary REGROUPING (1976), a fascinating film that shares with BORN IN FLAMES (1983) a profoundly innovative spirit and a deep commitment to transformational politics and social exploration. With its boldly unconventional form and its radically self-questioning approach to nonfiction cinema, Borden’s first film was a revelation and was soon thereafter reclaimed as a “lost feminist classic.” Now, six years later, it’s REGROUPING’s turn to take the spotlight, with a week of screenings of Anthology’s brand-new 16mm restoration. Alongside the new restoration we’ll present encore screenings of BORN IN FLAMES, as well as rare 35mm screenings of her equally accomplished follow-up, WORKING GIRLS (1986). Lizzie Borden will be here in person for selected screenings, alongside other special guests! Details to be announced soon. Lizzie Borden WORKING GIRLS (1986, 93 min, 35mm) Sex work is portrayed with radical nonjudgment in Borden’s immersive, richly detailed look at the rhythms and rituals of society’s most stigmatized profession. Inspired by the experiences of the sex workers Borden met while making BORN IN FLAMES, WORKING GIRLS reveals the textures of a day in the life of Molly (Louise Smith), a photographer working part-time in a Manhattan brothel, as she juggles a steady stream of clients, balances relationships with her coworkers with the demands of an ambitious madam, and above all fights to maintain her sense of self in a business in which the line between the personal and the professional is all too easily blurred. In viewing prostitution through the lens of labor, Borden boldly desensationalizes the subject, offering an empathetic, humanizing, often humorous depiction of women for whom this work is just another day at the office. “Borden belongs to a group of filmmakers, including Kathryn Bigelow and Jim Jarmusch, who emerged from the downtown post-punk art-music scene of the late 1970s. Back then, BORN IN FLAMES and WORKING GIRLS seemed like professionalized versions of the incendiary work produced by scrappy Super-8 filmmakers like Vivienne Dick and the team of Scott B and Beth B. Revisited decades later, WORKING GIRLS appears closer to Chantal Akerman’s epochal JEANNE DIELMAN, 23, QUAI DU COMMERCE, 1080 BRUXELLES. The similarity between the films is not so much subject (Akerman’s eponymous protagonist is a housewife prostitute) as attitude. WORKING GIRLS is notable for its measured structure, analytical camera placement and straightforward cool.” –J. Hoberman, NEW YORK TIMES

Saturday 28, May

Sunday 29, May

Tuesday 31, May

Thursday 2, June

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