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Monday 5, December

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

Monday 5, December

REPORT

REPORT

Monday 5, December

Tuesday 6, December

BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

Tuesday 6, December

EC: Christopher Maclaine

EC: Christopher Maclaine

Tuesday 6, December

WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

Tuesday 6, December

EC: Léger&Murphy / Picabia&Clair / Man Ray&Duchamp

EC: Léger&Murphy / Picabia&Clair / Man Ray&Duchamp

Tuesday 6, December

Wednesday 7, December

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

Wednesday 7, December

EC: Walden (Diaries, Notes, and Sketches)

EC: Walden (Diaries, Notes, and Sketches)

Wednesday 7, December

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

Wednesday 7, December

Thursday 8, December

EC: Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania

EC: Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania

Thursday 8, December

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

Thursday 8, December

Friday 9, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Friday 9, December

LET’S JUST DO IT OURSELVES

LET’S JUST DO IT OURSELVES

Friday 9, December

Saturday 10, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Saturday 10, December

HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

Saturday 10, December

Sunday 11, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Sunday 11, December

HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

Sunday 11, December

Monday 12, December

WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

Monday 12, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Monday 12, December

BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

Monday 12, December

Tuesday 13, December

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

Tuesday 13, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Tuesday 13, December

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

Tuesday 13, December

Wednesday 14, December

EC: I Was Born, But...

EC: I Was Born, But...

Wednesday 14, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Wednesday 14, December

Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Wednesday 14, December

Thursday 15, December

BUNKER

BUNKER

Thursday 15, December

CASA SUSANNA

CASA SUSANNA

Thursday 15, December

Friday 16, December

THE GARDEN

THE GARDEN

Friday 16, December

EXUBERANCE AS PROCESS

EXUBERANCE AS PROCESS

Friday 16, December

EC: There Was a Father

EC: There Was a Father

Friday 16, December

Saturday 17, December

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

Saturday 17, December

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

Saturday 17, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 1

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 1

Saturday 17, December

PASTURE

PASTURE

Saturday 17, December

deadbird

deadbird

Saturday 17, December

Sunday 18, December

LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

Sunday 18, December

LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

Sunday 18, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 2

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 2

Sunday 18, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 3

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 3

Sunday 18, December

CASA SUSANNA

CASA SUSANNA

Sunday 18, December

Monday 19, December

EC: I Was Born, But...

EC: I Was Born, But...

Monday 19, December

EC: Marie Menken

EC: Marie Menken

Monday 19, December

EC: Sunrise

EC: Sunrise

Monday 19, December

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

Monday 19, December

Tuesday 20, December

Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Tuesday 20, December

EC: Robert Nelson

EC: Robert Nelson

Tuesday 20, December

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

Tuesday 20, December

EC: Sunrise

EC: Sunrise

Tuesday 20, December

Wednesday 21, December

EC: There Was a Father

EC: There Was a Father

Wednesday 21, December

EC: Sidney Peterson

EC: Sidney Peterson

Wednesday 21, December

LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

Wednesday 21, December

Thursday 22, December

LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

Thursday 22, December

EC: Mother

EC: Mother

Thursday 22, December

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER / UN FILM COMME LES AUTRES

An analysis of the social upheaval of May 1968, made in the immediate wake of the workers’ and students’ protests, the film consists of two parts, each with identical image tracks and differing narration. “The first film in Godard’s ‘radical’ period finds the director rejecting established notions of narrative and authorship to present a dialectic response to the events of May ’68. […] While Godard would refine his radical approach significantly in his later films under the Dziga Vertov Group banner, A FILM LIKE ANY OTHER is a fascinating milestone in the illustrious filmmaker’s career, representing the revolutionary juncture from which Godard would not turn back.” –BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE

Monday 5, December

Thursday 8, December

Show Future Dates
A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA MONOGATARI

“The leader of a down-at-the-heels band of traveling players returns to a small mountain town and meets his grown son, who was unaware of his father’s existence. The son himself becomes involved with one of the actresses in the troupe. Ozu took the idea from a 1929 American film, THE BARKER, about a circus barker whose educated son falls for a performer in his father’s troupe, and completely transformed it with added vital characters, including the former mistress.” –PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE “Ozu turned this slightly melodramatic story into a picture of great atmosphere and intensity of character, one in which story, actors, and setting all combine to create a whole world, the first of those eight-reel universes in which everything takes on a consistency somewhat greater than life: in short, a work of art.” –Donald Richie

Saturday 17, December

Monday 19, December

Show Future Dates
BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

BRITISH SOUNDS (aka SEE YOU AT MAO)

“Godard’s startling, uncompromising attempt at a revolutionary cinema marked a new stage in the aesthetic evolution of modern cinema’s most radical experimenter. Believing that the narrative film – even when modified as in his own BREATHLESS or MASCULINE-FEMININE – was outdated and bourgeois, Godard loosened a propagandistic audio-visual barrage on the senses that combines Maoism, the Beatles, multiple sound tracks, minimal cinema à la Warhol, nudity (accompanied by a women’s liberation statement), and excerpts from Nixon, Pompidou, and the Communist Manifesto, all ending with a blood-spattered hand painfully reaching for a red flag.” –HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE

Tuesday 6, December

Monday 12, December

Show Future Dates
BUNKER

BUNKER

Working with and against the documentary tradition, and incorporating innovative stylistic techniques to emphasize issues of truth, misunderstanding, and personal history, Jenny Perlin’s work looks closely at the ways in which social machinations are reflected in the smallest fragments of daily life. Her new feature film, BUNKER, investigates the lonely lives of American men who have decided to live in decommissioned military bunkers and nuclear missile silos. More and more American men are deciding to live alone in decommissioned military bunkers and nuclear missile silos, even as an upscale industry begins to cater to “preppers,” people who fear the imminent breakdown of society and the destruction of the United States. In BUNKER, Perlin journeys by herself into the middle of America to meet such men, and the builders and salesmen who cater to them. The film follows a uniquely American path, moving from undisclosed location to undisclosed location, from the headquarters of a bunker construction firm to the homes of men who have cut themselves off from society, and ultimately to a newly constructed isolated retreat and an upscale nuclear missile silo where developers claim they can recreate New York City life hundreds of feet underground. Investigating toxic American myths, including self-reliance, masculinity, home safety and security, and family life in a time of climate crisis, economic upheaval, and political strife, BUNKER reveals the pathological inner workings of an American phenomenon on the rise. “Rigorous and refreshingly unvarnished…BUNKER patiently observes several American men as they take up residence in decommissioned missile silos and elaborate underground condos in anticipation of impending nuclear fallout. With a sense of melancholy permeating its spectacle, the documentary exposes the revival of Cold War anxieties and doomsday fetishism among ostensibly ordinary grandfathers and uncles. […] By interviewing subjects with a wartime journalist’s emotional distance and crafting still-life portraiture of their windowless lives, Perlin reveals the loneliness and dark humor of what some of her subjects consider the end times.” –Tomasin Fonseca, FILM COMMENT

Friday 9, December

Saturday 10, December

Sunday 11, December

Monday 12, December

Tuesday 13, December

Wednesday 14, December

Thursday 15, December

Show Future Dates
CASA SUSANNA

CASA SUSANNA

In the 1950s and 60s, an underground network of transgender women and cross-dressing men found refuge at a modest house in the Catskills region of New York. Known as Casa Susanna, the house provided a safe place for them to express their true selves and live for a few days as they had always dreamed – dressed as women without fear of being incarcerated or institutionalized for their self-expression. Using a rich trove of color photos of Casa Susanna’s guests, archival footage, and personal remembrances, the film reconstructs the forgotten life of Susanna Valenti, the courageous woman who ran the house. From her enlistment in the army as a man to her marriage to Marie, an eccentric older Italian woman, Susanna led a life that, even today, many would find hard to imagine. Like Susanna, many who came to the Catskills house were married and fathers, working as airplane pilots, tugboat captains, film directors, and authors. They found each other and Casa Susanna through word-of-mouth and Transvestia, a magazine for and by the trans and cross-dressing community. In the film, two people whose lives were forever changed at Casa Susanna, Diane and Kate, travel back to the now-abandoned site and share their memories of a time when people like them, from all over the country, came to a place where they were free to dress and live as women from morning to night.

Thursday 15, December

Sunday 18, December

Show Future Dates
deadbird

deadbird

A filmic reimagining of a live work by devynn emory that was scheduled to premiere at Danspace Project in NYC in Spring 2020. It is a grief space for their body as a hospice and COVID nurse and spirit medium, and is a balm to reimagine care. In all its various forms, “deadbird” serves as a container to process the intensity of nursing and honor the lives who have passed in their care. Conceived prior to the pandemic, the project took on even more significance and urgency in 2020, as a way of holding the grief and loneliness of being a healthcare worker during COVID-19. “[The work] draws on every aspect of emory’s identity: nurse, ceremonial guide, dancer, bodyworker. Their transness, their indigenous ancestry, their relationship with their late grandmother – all of these elements are present throughout. emory does not have a neat brand. They insist, subtly, on being seen for all their parts. Maybe after a year of isolation, deprived of the luxury to compartmentalize ourselves, we are ready to hold emory’s complexities.” –Noa Weiss, THE BROOKLYN RAIL

Saturday 17, December

EC: Christopher Maclaine

EC: Christopher Maclaine

“The few facts that are known about Maclaine are, at best, sketchy. He was a published poet, a sort of down and out San Francisco bohemian who later became one of the psychic casualties of that scene. His last years were spent at Sunnyacres, a state mental hospital in Fairfield, California. These films, along with Ron Rice’s, are clearly the most significant work to come out of the beat period.” –J.J. Murphy All films preserved by Anthology Film Archives. THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD (1957, 14 min, 16mm) BEAT (1958, 6 min, 16mm) SCOTCH HOP (1959, 5.5 min, 16mm) THE END (1953, 35 min, 16mm) Total running time: ca. 65 min. [THE MAN WHO INVENTED GOLD, BEAT, and SCOTCH HOP are not part of the Essential Cinema collection, but are included here as a special bonus.]

Tuesday 6, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 1

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 1

All films in this program are b&w and silent. THE CONJUROR / L’ILLUSIONISTE FIN DE SIÈCLE (1899, 1 min, 35mm) TRIP TO THE MOON / VOYAGE DANS LA LUNE (1902, 12 min, 35mm) THE PALACE OF THE ARABIAN NIGHTS / LE PALAIS DES MILLE ET UNE NUITS (1905, 21 min, 35mm) DELIRIUM IN A STUDIO / ALI BARBOUYOU ALI BOUF À L’HUILE (1907, 5 min, 35mm) MERRY FROLICS OF SATAN / LES QUATRES CENT FARCES DU DIABLE (1906, 18 min, 35mm) Magician, master of special effects, Méliès broke with the realistic (Lumière) mode of cinema and celebrated unlimited fantasy and artificiality (in its best sense). Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Saturday 17, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 2

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 2

The films in this program are hand-tinted and silent. THE CASCADE OF FIRE / LA CASCADE DE FEU (1904, 3 min, 35mm) A DIABOLICAL TENANT / UN LOCATAIRE DIABOLIQUE (1909, 8 min, 35mm) THE HUNCHBACK FAIRY / LA FÉE CARABOSSE (1906, 13 min, 35mm) VOYAGE ACROSS THE IMPOSSIBLE / LE VOYAGE À TRAVERS L’IMPOSSIBLE (1904, 20 min, 35mm) Total running time: ca. 50 min.

Sunday 18, December

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 3

EC: Georges Méliès, Program 3

All films in this program are b&w and silent. EXTRAORDINARY ILLUSIONS / ILLUSIONS FUNAMBULESQUES (1903, 3 min, 16mm) THE ENCHANTED WELL / LE PUITS FANTASTIQUE (1903, 3 min, 16mm) THE APPARITION / LE REVENANT (1903, 3 min, 16mm) TUNNEL UNDER THE CHANNEL / LE TUNNEL SOUS LA MANCHE (1907, 25 min, 35mm) SIGHTSEEING THROUGH WHISKY / PAUVRE JEAN OU LES MESAVENTURES D’UN BUVEUR (1909, 5 min, 35mm) THE DOCTOR’S SECRET / HYDROTHÉRAPIE FANTASTIQUE (1909, 11 min, 35mm) Total running time: ca. 55 min.

Sunday 18, December

EC: I Was Born, But...

EC: I Was Born, But...

(UMARETE WA MITA KEREDO…) by Yasujiro Ozu (1932, 100 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. With English intertitles.) In referring to this film Ozu stated, “I started to make a film about grownups. While I had originally planned to make a fairly bright little story, it changed while I was working on it and came out very dark.” The story concerns a very average suburban office worker, with a wife and two very un-average sons, who is unable to stand up to his boss. “Joyful…as true and as moving and as timely today as it was in 1932.” –Jonas Mekas

Wednesday 14, December

Monday 19, December

Show Future Dates
EC: Léger&Murphy / Picabia&Clair / Man Ray&Duchamp

EC: Léger&Murphy / Picabia&Clair / Man Ray&Duchamp

Fernand Léger & Dudley Murphy BALLET MÉCANIQUE (1924, 19 min, 35mm, silent. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.) “The two fundamental works of the graphic cinema from the 1920s made without animation were Fernand Léger’s BALLET MÉCANIQUE and Marcel Duchamp’s ANEMIC CINEMA. By extending a metaphor from several of his paintings into film, Léger compared a universe of human actions and everyday objects to the functions of a machine.” –P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM René Clair & Francis Picabia ENTR’ACTE (1924, 22 min, 35mm) One of the indisputable masterpieces of Dada cinema, ENTR’ACTE was created, as its title suggests, to function as a diversion in between the two acts of Francis Picabia and Erik Satie’s avant-garde ballet RELÂCHE. Man Ray LE RETOUR À LA RAISON (1923, 2 min, 16mm, silent) ÉTOILE DE MER (1927, 13 min, 16mm, silent) EMAK BAKIA (1927, 18 min, 35mm, silent) “All the films I have made have been improvisations. I did not write scenarios. It was automatic cinema. I worked alone. My intention was to set in motion the compositions I made in photography. As for the camera, I use it to capture something I do not want to paint. But I am not interested in producing ‘beautiful photography’ for the cinema.” –Man Ray, “All the Films I Have Made” (1965) Marcel Duchamp & Man Ray ANEMIC CINEMA (1926, 7 min, 35mm, silent) “Duchamp alternates head-on views of his illusion-producing roto-reliefs with similarly turned discs of words, elaborate French puns printed spirally, creating a fluctuation of illusory depth within a very narrow spectrum (from the slightly convex or slightly concave illusions) to the flat readings. In this, his only film, Duchamp typically crystallized the significance of the graphic film.” –P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Tuesday 6, December

EC: Marie Menken

EC: Marie Menken

All films preserved by Anthology Film Archives. GLIMPSE OF THE GARDEN (1957, 5 min, 16mm) ARABESQUE FOR KENNETH ANGER (1961, 4 min, 16mm) EYE MUSIC IN RED MAJOR (1961, 4 min, 16mm, silent) NOTEBOOK (1962-63, 10 min, 16mm, silent) GO! GO! GO! (1962-64, 12 min, 16mm, silent) ANDY WARHOL (1965, 17 min, 16mm) LIGHTS (1964-66, 7 min, 16mm, b&w, silent) “Marie Menken pioneered the radical transformation of the handheld, somatic camera into a formal matrix that would underpin an entire work in the films she made between 1945 and 1965. […] The extraordinary cinematic style that I have been calling Menken’s somatic camera has been her most influential gift to the American avant-garde cinema. It is an embodiment of the Emersonian invention of a pictorial air, the spiritual emancipation automatically brought about by ‘certain mechanical changes, a small alteration in our local position.’ It is also analogous to the equally Emersonian somatic theory of poesis Charles Olson was developing at nearly the same time: his emphasis on breath and proprioception corresponds to Menken’s identification of the camera with her body in motion and her cultivation of the respiratory and nervous agitation of the handheld camera even in its quietest moments.” –P. Adams Sitney, EYES UPSIDE DOWN Total running time: ca. 65 min.

Monday 19, December

EC: Mother

EC: Mother

(MAT) by Vsevolod I. Pudovkin (1926, 104 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Based on the novel by Maxim Gorky. In Russian with no subtitles; English synopsis available.) With the simple theme of a working-class mother growing in political consciousness through participation in revolutionary activity, this film established Pudovkin as one of the major figures of the Soviet cinema. His expert cutting on movement and his associated editing of unrelated scenes to form what he called a “plastic synthesis” are amply demonstrated here. Although in direct opposition to Eisenstein’s shock montage, Pudovkin used a linkage method advanced far beyond Kuleshov’s theories. “In the final episode Pudovkin resorts to the now famous simile of the ice-floe breaking up against the bastions of the great bridge with a movement parallel to that of the procession of men and women marching with the Red Flag held high before them, until they are scattered and broken by the cavalry. The ice-floe intensifies the action by its strong forward movement far more than by its obvious symbolism. The purpose of Pudovkin’s technique is to sublimate the action of every part of his film, so that the commonplace is raised to the level of a kind of epic poem.” –Roger Manvell, THE FILM AND THE PUBLIC

Thursday 22, December

EC: Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania

EC: Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania

by Jonas Mekas (1971-72, 82 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from The Film Foundation. Special thanks to Cineric, Inc., and Trackwise.) “The film consists of four parts. The first part contains some footage from my first years in America, 1949-52. The second part was shot in August 1971 in Lithuania. The third part is in Elmshorn, near Hamburg, where I spent eight months in a forced labor camp. The fourth part is in Vienna (1971) with Peter Kubelka, [Hermann] Nitsch, Annette Michelson, Ken Jacobs, etc. The film deals with home, memory, and culture.” –Jonas Mekas

Thursday 8, December

EC: Robert Nelson

EC: Robert Nelson

Both films in this program have been preserved by the Academy Film Archive. THE GREAT BLONDINO (1967, 42 min, 16mm) “The original Blondino was a 19th-century tightrope artist who among other feats crossed Niagara Falls trundling a wheelbarrow. In this film, Nelson sees Blondino as a metaphor for those who still try. Too subtle to be allegorical, the picture is in the shape of a quixotic search in which the goal is the journey and the means is the end.” –MUSEUM OF MODERN ART “It is…difficult to get at the rich visual texture that is the film’s most striking attribute. Long stretches are concerned with Blondino’s visions, dreams, and dreams within dreams. The film unfolds in brief recurring patterns of imagery. Even the more straightforward sections are dense with interpolated newsreel and TV commercial footage, visual gags, and homemade special effects. The net effect is funny, seamless, and elusive.” –J. Hoberman, “A Filmmakers Filming Monograph” & BLEU SHUT (1970, 33 min, 16mm) “Boat-name quizzes, dogs, cuts from Dreyer’s JOAN OF ARC in montage with a sultry whore, a car running up a ramp and crashing, pornography, a passionate embrace by a thirties hero and heroine; all somehow implicating Dreyer and Joan in the perverse synthesis of sex and technology. What’s happening here? Basically Nelson is leaving things unsaid.” –Leo Regan Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Tuesday 20, December

EC: Sidney Peterson

EC: Sidney Peterson

THE POTTED PSALM and THE PETRIFIED DOG have been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation. MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR and THE LEAD SHOES have been preserved by Anthology with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation. THE POTTED PSALM (1946, 19 min, 16mm) THE PETRIFIED DOG (1948, 19 min, 16mm) MR. FRENHOFFER AND THE MINOTAUR (1949, 21 min, 16mm) THE LEAD SHOES (1949, 17 min, 16mm) “These images are meant to play not on our rational senses, but on the infinite universe of ambiguity within us.” –Sidney Peterson “Sidney Peterson’s work and sensibility are those of a native American surrealist. Many of his films chronicle the picaresque adventures of a wacky protagonist and use disjunctive editing strategies to construct new time and space relations…. But perhaps their best-known feature is the use of distorted, funhouse mirror-images, which he created by shooting with an anamorphic lens. […] In his films, he investigates extreme states of consciousness, and the primary tool of his epistemology of irrationalism is the photographic image distorted and transformed to register the impact of those states.” –R. Bruce Elder, IMAGE AND IDENTITY Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Wednesday 21, December

EC: Sunrise

EC: Sunrise

by F.W. Murnau (1927, 95 min, 35mm, b&w. Script by Carl Meyer based on the story “A Trip to Tilsit” by Herman Sudermann. Photographed by Charles Rosher and Karl Strauss. With George O’Brien and Janet Gaynor.) Murnau’s first American film is an allegory set in no particular time or place, about a man who is temporarily overruled by his passions, inflamed by the power of evil as personified by the city woman, and who finally returns to his senses and the orderly family life of the country. It is a virtuoso exercise representing the expressiveness of the silent film as it neared its end. “SUNRISE becomes the lyrical culmination of a strain of German Expressionism that, married to American technology, could almost serve as a definition of the cinema. For the studio apparatus, enabling the creation of a spiritually and spatially unified microcosm, corresponds to the way the mind, in Expressionism, experiences reality – organizing it, imbuing it with personal associations, patterns, significances, until finally the only reality is a mental reality.” –Molly Haskell

Monday 19, December

Tuesday 20, December

Show Future Dates
EC: There Was a Father

EC: There Was a Father

(CHICHI ARIKI) by Yasujiro Ozu (1942, 87 min, 35mm. In Japanese with English subtitles.) “One of Ozu’s most perfect films. There is a naturalness and a consequent feeling of inevitability that is rare in cinema […] Critics have called the performance of Chishu Ryu in this film one of the best in the history of Japanese cinema, and they are right […] THERE WAS A FATHER has become one of the country’s most esteemed classics” –Donald Richie

Friday 16, December

Wednesday 21, December

Show Future Dates
EC: Walden (Diaries, Notes, and Sketches)

EC: Walden (Diaries, Notes, and Sketches)

by Jonas Mekas (1968-69, 180 min, 16mm) “Since 1950 I have been keeping a film diary. I have been walking around with my Bolex and reacting to the immediate reality: situations, friends, New York, seasons of the year. On some days I shot ten frames, on others ten seconds, still on others ten minutes. Or I shot nothing. When one writes diaries, it’s a retrospective process: you sit down, you look back at your day, and you write it all down. To keep a film (camera) diary, is to react (with your camera) immediately, now, this instant: either you get it now, or you don’t get it at all.” –Jonas Mekas

Wednesday 7, December

EXUBERANCE AS PROCESS

EXUBERANCE AS PROCESS

EXUBERANCE AS PROCESS, is a program of short films by visual artists. Primarily intended for gallery presentation, these works have been removed from their installation contexts and collated into a linear cinematic program. Disrupting the films from their formal intentions, this series creates conversations between the works in new ways. Augusto Cascales’s adaptation of CA Conrad’s text as a frantic and despairing performance to camera is juxtaposed with Carlos Motta’s breathtaking WHEN I LEAVE THIS WORLD, which, extracted from its narrative channel, becomes a meditation on transformation and sacrifice. This film features a hook suspension by Motta’s collaborator and trans species being, Tiamat Legion Medusa, and may be challenging for some viewers. TJ Cuthand’s 2-channel exploration of Witch-burning and folk magic within his family history invites a longer treatise from Vika Kirchenbauer as she excavates a form of self-reflexive art criticism through a series of personal photographic ephemera. TJ Cuthand MEDICINE AND MAGIC 2021, 5 min, digital Vika Kirchenbauer THE CAPACITY FOR ADEQUATE ANGER 2021, 15 min, digital Carlos Motta WHEN I LEAVE THIS WORLD 2022, 11 min, digital Augusto Cascales THE OBITUARY SHOW 2022, 22 min, digital Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Friday 16, December

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

FLOATING WEEDS / UKIKUSA

In 1959, Ozu remade his 1934 silent classic A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS in color with the celebrated cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa (RASHOMON, UGETSU). Setting his later version in a seaside location, Ozu otherwise preserves the details of his elegantly simple plot wherein an aging actor returns to a small town with his troupe and reunites with his former lover and illegitimate son, a scenario that enrages his current mistress and results in heartbreak for all. A STORY OF FLOATING WEEDS sees Ozu in the midst of developing his mode of expression; FLOATING WEEDS reveals his distinct style at its pinnacle. In each, the director captures the joy and sadness in everyday life.

Saturday 17, December

Tuesday 20, December

Show Future Dates
Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Good Morning / OHAYÔ

Ozu’s hilarious Technicolor reworking of his silent I WAS BORN, BUT…, GOOD MORNING is the story of two young boys in suburban Tokyo who take a vow of silence after their parents refuse to buy them a television set. Shot from the perspective of the petulant brothers, GOOD MORNING is an enchantingly satirical portrait of family life that gives rise to gags about romance, gossip, and the consumerism of modern Japan.

Wednesday 14, December

Tuesday 20, December

Show Future Dates
HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA

“One of the major works of Jean-Luc Godard, the eight-part essay film HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA has revealed itself slowly over a period of more than 30 years, as a sort of intellectual striptease. The project had its origins in a series of lectures that Godard delivered in Montreal in 1978, and which were published in 1980 as ‘Introduction to a True History of the Cinema.’ The book gave birth to a project for French television, originally to consist of 10 episodes; in 1987, Mr. Godard presented the first two installments, ‘Toutes les Histories’ (‘All the Stories’) and ‘Une Histoire Seule’ (‘A Single History’), at Cannes, and several more years passed before more episodes appeared…. Because of its long gestation, HISTOIRE(S) has already produced a considerable library of academic exegesis, and it is bound to produce even more. Composed of unidentified film clips, snatches of dialogue, glimpses of painting, passages of classical music, quotations of works of literature and art criticism, all orchestrated into thematic clusters and provocative contradictions, HISTOIRE(S) is by nature an open-ended, unstable work that even its author would be unable (and certainly unwilling) to explain. […] There are those who will always find Godard frustrating – or flatly denounce him as a fraud – because his work resists strict and systematic analysis. But as he has grown older, he has claimed the privilege, as David Byrne put it in a memorable lyric, to ‘stop making sense.’ What he has made instead is a sort of associational machine, as dense and obscure as any of the Symbolist poetry that also serves as one of Mr. Godard’s reference points, but one that also solicits the viewer’s participation in connecting the dots and filling in the blanks.” –Dave Kehr, NEW YORK TIMES

Saturday 10, December

Sunday 11, December

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LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

LATE AUTUMN / AKIBIYORI

“Another of Ozu’s late-career color remakes, LATE AUTUMN revisits the situation of his 1949 masterpiece LATE SPRING with Setsuko Hara, the filial child of the earlier film, here playing the mother of a daughter who declines to leave the nest. The movie is broader in tone than the original, but the camera placement never falters.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Sunday 18, December

Thursday 22, December

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LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

LATE SPRING / BANSHUN

“Ozu’s 1949 film inaugurated his majestic late period: it’s here that he decisively renounces melodrama (and, indeed, most surface action of any kind) and lets his camera settle into the still, long-take contemplation of his gently drawn characters. Setsuko Hara, in the first of many performances for Ozu, plays a young woman who has renounced marriage to stay with her elderly father (Chishu Ryu). When the father belatedly realizes what she’s done, he must encourage her to leave without wounding her feelings. The sense of loss and regret is beautifully balanced with the optimism of a new life beginning: for Ozu the family unit is not only a network of personal relationships but also the crisis point in the tragedy of time.” –Dave Kehr, CHICAGO READER

Sunday 18, December

Wednesday 21, December

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LET’S JUST DO IT OURSELVES

LET’S JUST DO IT OURSELVES

“Let’s Just Do It Ourselves” comes from the turn of phrase made popular by the ingenuity of Linda Goode Bryant and Just Above Midtown, a former NYC gallery that empowered Black artists, and is currently being revitalized in a MOMA retrospective. These words have long been a reaction for Black (women) artists when their work became embattled by the dominant narrative. Although timing is everything, Black women artists from years gone by aren’t done yet. Their art has come full circle and finally reached an audience feverish for its catalyzing insights. Actor and director Sandye Wilson began her career in the late 1980s at the center of New York’s Black Bohemian Renaissance, which gave rise to Spike Lee and others. Wilson’s short films, SO MANY THINGS TO CONSIDER (1996) and NOT SO PRIVATE (2004) poetically lay bare pleasure and desire in Black women’s lives. With little to no distribution, Wilson transitioned out of the arts and into a lesser creative field. We will screen Wilson’s works alongside Fronza Woods’s recently restored KILLING TIME (1979), to contextualize the creative lockout both women experienced in pursuit of longevity in filmmaking. This program is guest-programmed by Melissa Lyde (Alfreda’s Cinema) and co-presented by Alfreda’s Cinema and The African Film Festival; for more info about both organizations visit: www.instagram.com/alfredascinema/ and https://africanfilmny.org/ Sandye Wilson SO MANY THINGS TO CONSIDER 1996, 10 min, 16mm Sandye Wilson draws on the urban innocence of Manhattan’s Lower East Side, expressed in poetic cinema vérité, while an inner monologue constructs the makings of a “good man.” Romantic recollections and arousal conjure a compelling lover from the filmmaker’s childhood fantasy. Sandye Wilson NOT SO PRIVATE 2004, 31 min, digital Candid testimonies from varying New York City women, including artist Carrie Mae Weems and Wilson, recount their earliest engagements with arousal, erotic pleasure, and feelings of objectivity in a society where Black girls are sexualized at an early age. Fronza Woods KILLING TIME 1979, 15 min, 16mm-to-DCP An offbeat, wryly humorous look at the dilemma of a would-be suicide unable to find the right outfit to die in, KILLING TIME examines the personal habits, socialization, and complexities of life that keep us going. Total running time: ca. 60 min.

Friday 9, December

PASTURE

PASTURE

FILMMAKER IN PERSON! As a young trans New Yorker, the filmmaker arrives in Southern California in pursuit of a coalition near the U.S.-Mexico border. In the filmmaker’s first mid-length film, he harnesses diary and performance material to probe the nature of solidarity, including his own relationship to time and fantasy, storytelling and change. What does it mean to wish for a different world, and what role does the search itself play? Following the screening, Mendelsohn will appear for a conversation with filmmaker and curator Angelo Madsen Minax and filmmaker Sindhu Thirumalaisamy.

Saturday 17, December

REPORT

REPORT

ANTHOLOGY FILM ARCHIVES DIGITAL RESTORATION! REPORT was digitized through a partnership between Anthology Film Archives and Lightbox Film Center at University of the Arts, with funding from Ron and Suzanne Naples. Special thanks to Jean-Bernard Bucky, Robert Peyton, Max Bienstock, and Jesse Pires. “Shot during the 1968/69 school year at University of California Berkeley, REPORT was created as part of Norman Jacobson’s experimental political science course ‘Toward an Expression of the Idea of Freedom’. The film, which features cinematography by avant-garde filmmaker Ed Emshwiller, merges fiction and documentary as it portrays the widening generation gap within the university, and in society at large. At the center of the film is an uncertain teacher and the students who challenge him. The filmmakers sought to not only capture this scenario but the real-life experiences and opinions of the students in the class. Combining scripted elements, on-the-street interviews, behind-the-scenes conversations, and cinema verité footage of the demonstrations and police crackdown connected to the Third World Liberation Front campus protests, REPORT is a complex portrait of American higher education at a particularly tumultuous time in history. As issues surrounding free speech on college campuses continue to dominate our public discourse, REPORT is a fascinating time capsule from the epicenter of student activism.” –LIGHTBOX FILM CENTER Preceded by: Ed Emshwiller WOE OH HO NO 1972, 13 min, 16mm-to-DCP Collaboratively produced at Wantagh High School in Nassau County, New York, Ed Emshwiller’s WOE OH HO NO ventures into the unconscious mind of the average student.

Monday 5, December

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

STRUGGLE IN ITALY / LOTTE IN ITALIA

Not necessarily a film about the struggles in Italy, this work was in fact largely shot in Godard and Anne Wiazemsky’s home at the time. It is a discursive reflection on a young Italian woman’s shift from political “theory” to political “practice” and, at the same time, a self-questioning of its own practice and theories. “The Dziga Vertov Group films are not purely rhetorical. They are also formal, with rhythms and patterns unlike anything else in the Godardian oeuvre. Take STRUGGLE IN ITALY, for example. The film is devised as its own double, the narration spoken in Italian and overdubbed in French. […] But more significantly, STRUGGLE is a film of visual repetitions. A bowl of soup, a woman trying on a sweater, a math lesson, and other inserts alternate with the lessons in dialectics, as if the film is trying to teach you how to watch it as well as provide a lecture of historical materialism. STRUGGLE IN ITALY may be Godard’s most [Hollis] Framptonian film.” –Michael Sicinski, MUBI NOTEBOOK

Wednesday 7, December

Tuesday 13, December

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THE GARDEN

THE GARDEN

The Hallmark Channel, the Lifetime network, and the star of TV’s “The Big Bang Theory” have all spent the past few years bringing anodyne gay Christmas stories to our screens. But Derek Jarman already made the greatest, gayest, queerest Christmas movie way back in 1990, and it’s time we made it into the holiday cinematic classic it deserves to be. Overflowing with rage at the British governmental homophobia that abandoned queer people with AIDS during the 1980s, Jarman’s Super-8 fever dream reimagines Biblical stories in astonishing ways. Jesus is a gay couple attacked by jackbooted fascists, the Devil is a leatherman, Mary Magdalene is a drag queen, and Tilda Swinton plays the Madonna. It all plays out in the actual garden of Jarman’s Prospect Cottage, which the filmmaker tended until his death from AIDS-related illness in 1994 and where he was canonized as a Saint by the drag queen-activist troupe the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. When most of the world is busy worshiping Saint Nick, let us instead pay tribute to Saint Derek of the Celluloid Knights of Dungeness and his brilliant masterpiece, which seems more relevant than ever in these very scary times.

Friday 16, December

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

VLADIMIR AND ROSA / VLADIMIR ET ROSA

“In 1970, Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin continued their run of politically-inspired work – nominally Maoist but locked in conflict between doctrine and image – with a Brechtian farce of the trial of the Chicago Seven. What emerges is a probing psychological analysis of the modern radical as well as an incipient effort to speak in a new voice in another court: Godard and Gorin themselves, raising a racket on a tennis court with the help – or, rather, the decisive hindrance – of a low-tech feedback loop. It resounds with the tangled discourse of a troubled time and suggests an incipient desire to play the game again, if by a new set of rules.” –Richard Brody, NEW YORKER

Wednesday 7, December

Tuesday 13, December

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WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

WIND FROM THE EAST / LE VENT D’EST

A loosely conceived “leftist western” that moves through a series of practical and analytical passages (“an organization of shots,” Godard called it) into a finale based around the process of manufacturing homemade weapons. “The consensus favorite among the Dziga Vertov films has historically been WIND FROM THE EAST. It is certainly the most well-constructed of the bunch, and what’s more it possesses the outward trappings of a Western. Granted, it satisfies that genre about as well as, say, Andy Warhol’s VINYL serves as a legitimate adaptation of A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, which is to say, barely. Visually, WIND FROM THE EAST is charming, not unlike an amateur rendition of WEEKEND as imagined by Ken Jacobs during his LITTLE STABS AT HAPPINESS phase. […] The catalog of revolutionary and anti-revolutionary moments in cinematic history, once matched with Godard’s later, more elliptical style, can certainly be read as a rough draft for HISTOIRE(S) DU CINÉMA.” –Michael Sicinski, MUBI NOTEBOOK

Tuesday 6, December

Monday 12, December

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