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Friday 22, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Friday 22, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 2: December 1947

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 2: December 1947

Friday 22, October

Saturday 23, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Saturday 23, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 3: May 12, 1948

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 3: May 12, 1948

Saturday 23, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 4: March 1951

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 4: March 1951

Saturday 23, October

Sunday 24, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 5: May 1953

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 5: May 1953

Sunday 24, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

Sunday 24, October

Monday 25, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Monday 25, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 7: January 29, 1958

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 7: January 29, 1958

Monday 25, October

Tuesday 26, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Tuesday 26, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 8: May 1959+Feb 24, 1960

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 8: May 1959+Feb 24, 1960

Tuesday 26, October

Wednesday 27, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Wednesday 27, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

Wednesday 27, October

Thursday 28, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

Thursday 28, October

Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched

Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched

Thursday 28, October

Friday 29, October

Witchfinder General

Witchfinder General

Friday 29, October

The Blood on Satan's Claw

The Blood on Satan's Claw

Friday 29, October

Saturday 30, October

FREE: Whistle and I'll Come to You+Robin Redbreast

FREE: Whistle and I'll Come to You+Robin Redbreast

Saturday 30, October

The Wicker Man (Final Cut)

The Wicker Man (Final Cut)

R

Saturday 30, October

Messiah of Evil

Messiah of Evil

Saturday 30, October

Sunday 31, October

Murrain

Murrain

Sunday 31, October

Let's Scare Jessica to Death

Let's Scare Jessica to Death

Sunday 31, October

Viy

Viy

Sunday 31, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 2: December 1947

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 2: December 1947

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 2: DECEMBER 1947 Robert Anderson THE FEELING OF REJECTION (1947, 21 min, 35mm-to-digital. Courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada and A/V Geeks.) “The case history of Margaret, a 23-year-old girl who has physical disorders with no physical causes. A psychiatrist shows her the root of her troubles – childhood overprotection and discouragement of her efforts to express herself, resulting in a crippling fear of failure and a complete inability to assert herself. When Margaret understands her problem, she develops new and healthier habits of behavior.” –NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA John & James Whitney FILM EXERCISES 1-5 (1943-45, 18 min, 16mm) “The visual images in these films were created by shining light through flexible masks, so that the camera was filming direct light rather than light reflected from drawings. The results seem like dazzling neon apparitions, that were as novel and shocking as the accompanying soundtrack.” –William Moritz John Ferno AND SO THEY LIVE (1940, 25 min, 35mm-to-digital. Edited by Irving Lerner.) “Stark, realistic documentary showing poorly educated ‘mountain peoples’ living in poverty and stricken with disease. Their solace comes in strong family bonds and the prospect of improved educational opportunities. John Ferno had been a cameraman for Joris Ivens and Henri Storck.” –FIELD GUIDE TO SPONSORED FILMS Norman McLaren HEN HOP (1942, 4 min, 35mm-to-digital) “This joyful short animation features a dancing hen that transforms into an egg. The film was made without a camera by Norman McLaren, who drew directly onto 35mm movie stock with ordinary pen and ink. Color was added optically.” –NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA FIVE FOR FOUR (1942, 3 min, 35mm-to-digital) “This animated short serves as a wartime savings campaign. Symbolic figures, drawn directly on 35mm film stock, move and dance against a simple painted background. The score is ‘Pinetop’s Boogie Woogie,’ by Albert Ammons.” –NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Friday 22, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 3: May 12, 1948

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 3: May 12, 1948

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 3: MAY 12, 1948 Arne Sucksdorff WIND FROM THE WEST / VINDEN FRÅN VÄSTER (1942, 17 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute.) “A blend of fact and fantasy, set in the land of the Lapps in northernmost Sweden. In a schoolhouse young Nils sits dreamily longing that he might go with the older Lapps on their yearly migration to the mountains. Presently the boy dozes, and in his dream the voice of the Wind from the West speaks to him, and takes him on a visit to the mountains.” –MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL AGGRESSION AND DESTRUCTION GAMES: BALLOONS (1941, 17 min, 16mm-to-digital. Produced by the Department of Child Study, Vassar College. Courtesy of Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive.) Two boys, both between the ages of four and five, are subjects in a study of aggressive and destructive impulses. The film shows how differently two children, but a few months apart in age and from similar backgrounds, respond to a graduated series of opportunities and invitations to break balloons. Demonstration film of a projective technique developed by L. Joseph Stone. Sergei Eisenstein, Grigori Alexandrov, Eduard Tissé, and Sol Lesser DEATH DAY (1931-34, 15 min, 16mm) “One of three films released by Upton Sinclair through producer Sol Lesser, DEATH DAY is comprised of footage shot by Sergei Eisenstein for his unfinished film QUE VIVA MEXICO! This short subject focuses on the Day of the Dead festivities and is an homage to the artist José Guadalupe Posada. Though Eisenstein did not edit this film, his exquisite sense of Mexico and its people, culture and traditions are clearly evident.” –Bruce Posner, UNSEEN CINEMA Paul Rotha THE WORLD IS RICH (1947, 35 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.) “An early release from the newly created Central Office of Information, [THE WORLD IS RICH] was part of a trend in British documentary towards international subject matter. But it was also an informal sequel to Rotha’s 1943 film WORLD OF PLENTY, concerned as it is with the food situation confronted by the globe in the early years after WWII. […] The film is frankly promotional – for the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization…yet it is also viscerally angry that humankind and its political systems have allowed famine to occur and persist.” –BFI SCREENONLINE Total running time: ca. 90 min.

Saturday 23, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 4: March 1951

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 4: March 1951

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 4: MARCH 1951 [The descriptions for this program are taken from the original Cinema 16 program notes.] Curtis Harrington ON THE EDGE (1949, 6 min, 16mm) Dream or reality? A dark and doom-haunted episode of desperation is acted out by two people in a setting of eerie desolation. A striking new experimental film by Curtis Harrington, producer of FRAGMENT OF SEEKING. THE ATOM STRIKES (Army Pictorial Service/U.S. Army Signal Corps, 1948, 31 min, 35mm-to-digital. Courtesy of A/V Geeks.) First detailed account of the effects of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, just released: an unprecedented film document. Includes dramatic interview with a survivor. THE WORK OF U.P.A. Cinema 16 proudly presents the first comprehensive compilation of the work of United Productions of America (producers of Columbia’s sensational cartoon GERALD MCBOING-BOING) whose outstanding films promise to revolutionize the American cartoon field. Pete Burness TROUBLE INDEMNITY (1950, 7 min, 35mm) John Hubley PUNCHY DE LEON (1950, 7 min, 35mm) Pete Burness BUNGLED BUNGALOW (1950, 7 min, 35mm) Robert Cannon GERALD MCBOING-BOING (1950, 8 min, 35mm. New print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.) Lester F. Beck HYPNOTIC BEHAVIOR (1949, 25 min, 16mm. Print courtesy of A/V Geeks.) In a series of unstaged, authentic experiments two subjects are hypnotized and in trance experience insensibility to pain; blindness and deafness; eye and arm catalepsy; post-hypnotic amnesia. According to instructions given in the trance state, the same photographs appear amusing to one subject, depressing to the other in a fascinating last sequence. Produced by Dr. Lester F. Beck, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon. Total running time: ca. 95 min.

Saturday 23, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 5: May 1953

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 5: May 1953

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 5: MAY 1953 [The descriptions for this program are taken from the original Cinema 16 program notes.] CORAL WONDERLAND (1950, 30 min, 16mm. Produced by Noel & Kelly Monkman, with commentary by Wilfrid Thomas. Print courtesy of A/V Geeks.) A journey into a mysterious universe: Luxurious coral growths and startling, underwater creatures of the island reefs come to life in magnificent color under the microscope. Jiri Trnka SONG OF THE PRAIRIE / ARIE PRERIE (1949, 21 min, 35mm-to-DCP. Courtesy of the Czech National Film Archive.) A delicious satire on Westerns, enacted by Trnka’s (THE EMPEROR’S NIGHTINGALE) charming puppets, complete with a damsel in distress and a rootin’ tootin’ climax. Chester Kessler PLAGUE SUMMER (1951, 17 min, 16mm) The record of a journey of six allegorical characters through landscapes brutalized by war. A hand-drawn adaptation by Chester Kessler of Kenneth Patchen’s “Journal of Albion Moonlight.” “Drawn with extraordinary imagination.” –Lewis Jacobs, EXPERIMENT IN FILM Giles Healey MAYA THROUGH THE AGES (1949, 45 min, 16mm) An exploration of the most brilliant New World Civilization of Pre-Columbian times, including Healey’s historic trek into the jungles of Chiapas, the discovery of the temples of Bonampak with their unique frescoes, and his unforgettable encounter with the present day descendants of the Mayas, the strange Lacandona Indians, Stone Age survivors in our time. Total running time: ca. 120 min.

Sunday 24, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 6: May 1957

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 6: MAY 1957 Alfréd Radok DISTANT JOURNEY (1949, 103 min, 35mm-to-DCP. In Czech and German with English subtitles. Distributed by Janus Films.) “Alfréd Radok’s unaccountably neglected masterpiece, an unrelenting epic of human suffering and degradation, recounts for all time the horror and the realities of the concentration camp universe. Intentionally intensified, non-realist film techniques (borrowing from both the expressionist and surrealist tradition) add to the dramatic impact of this unique work of film art.” –CINEMA 16 PROGRAM NOTES “The most brilliant and the most powerful film on the subject ever made…departs from stark literalness into a strange, horrible, fantastic grotesqueness that truly comprehends those black barbarities. […] A quality of nightmare and madness builds up, until the final episode of mass destruction causes a hypnosis of insanity.” –NEW YORK TIMES

Sunday 24, October

Wednesday 27, October

Show Future Dates
Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 7: January 29, 1958

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 7: January 29, 1958

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 7: JANUARY 29, 1958 An Evening of Poetic & Surrealist Films Robert Vickrey TEXTURE OF DECAY (1953, 11 min, 16mm-to-digital. Digitized by Anthology Film Archives, courtesy of the Estate of Robert Remsen Vickrey.) Painter Robert Vickrey was well-known in his day for his magical realist style and his technical brilliance (in particular his mastery of the Renaissance technique of egg tempera painting), as well as for his writings on art and the numerous portraits he painted for Time Magazine. Vickrey was also enamored of the cinema, and made several short films of his own as part of the NYC experimental film scene in the 1950s. Rarely screened today, these works include TEXTURE OF DECAY, which concerns a man driven to suicide by the atmosphere of an abandoned house. Charles & Ray Eames HOUSE: AFTER FIVE YEARS OF LIVING (1955, 11 min, 16mm) “An exploration of the Eames House and Studio, made five years after Charles and Ray began living there. It is composed entirely of still images shot as 35mm transparencies by Charles between 1949 and 1955.” –EAMES OFFICE Sidney Peterson THE PETRIFIED DOG (1948, 19 min, 16mm) THE PETRIFIED DOG has been preserved by Anthology Film Archives through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation. “With macabre slapstick, Peterson evokes a child’s fantasies of birth, love, and death in terms of chiropractors, fights, flights, and eternal triangles. The soundtrack is highly experimental.” –GROVE PRESS FILM CATALOG Herman G. Weinberg AUTUMN FIRE (1931, 23 min, 16mm) “Weinberg’s second personal film is a poetic evocation of an absent lover as imagined by the central female character, whom Weinberg loved and sought to marry. Very sophisticated editing adds to the misty cinematography. Happily, actress Erna Bergman accepted Weinberg’s proposal soon after she saw the film.” –Robert A. Haller Oskar Fischinger MOTION PAINTING 1 (1947, 11 min, 16mm) “Volumes could be written about this film which stands in length and complexity as Fischinger’s major work. It is perhaps the only one of his films which is truly and completely (or purely) abstract (or absolute). Its images are actors in a complex being which modulates and transforms itself before our eyes, an object and an experience at the same time, something we must feel and contemplate, and meditate through.” –William Moritz, FILM CULTURE Total running time: ca. 80 min.

Monday 25, October

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 8: May 1959+Feb 24, 1960

Amos Vogel Centenary, PGM 8: May 1959+Feb 24, 1960

AMOS VOGEL CENTENARY: CINEMA 16 This fall New York City’s various repertory cinemas are joining forces to celebrate the centenary of pioneering writer, curator, exhibitor, distributor, and New York Film Festival co-founder Amos Vogel, a figure whose immense and formative contributions to film culture in New York City, the United States, and around the world can hardly be overstated. Beginning with a 7-part program at the 59th New York Film Festival, which will survey the many different facets of Vogel’s career, the centenary tribute will then fan out across the city, with each venue focusing on a specific dimension of Vogel’s accomplishments, including his foundational work at Lincoln Center; his time as film consultant for Grove Press; and his classic study “Film as a Subversive Art”, which will soon be reissued by Film Desk Books. Here at Anthology, we’ll be shining a spotlight on Vogel’s innovative and influential Cinema 16 screening series. Cinema 16 opened with a program in November 1947, and ran consistently until its demise in 1963. Within the context of Anthology’s history and curatorial approach, Cinema 16 is particularly fascinating not only for the crucial role it ultimately played in the formation of the institution – it represented a key inspiration for AFA’s founder Jonas Mekas – but also for its radically distinct sensibility and programming orientation. The relationship between Vogel and Mekas was a complicated one: while Jonas never hesitated to credit Vogel and Cinema 16 as a deeply formative influence (he described Cinema 16 as “my Sunday church, my university”), and to praise Vogel’s work in his Village Voice “Movie Journal” column, his own programming and distribution efforts of the early-to-mid 1960s were conceived in part to address what he saw as Vogel’s blind spots and his dominance of alternative film exhibition and access, a dynamic that led to a rift between the two figures. Nevertheless, in hindsight Vogel’s Cinema 16 selections are fascinating for the radically different programming philosophy they embody – above all their profound openness to new ideas, their political commitment, their sustained focus on the 16mm film gauge, and their extraordinary freedom in combining experimental films, narrative shorts and features, animations, science and educational films, and almost every other imaginable category of moving image work within a single program. For this series we’ve chosen to recreate (as far as possible) a selection of Vogel’s original Cinema 16 programs, gravitating towards those that feature long-neglected, forgotten, and rarely screened works, and that are especially notable for combining distinctly disparate categories of films. Even nearly 60 years after the final Cinema 16 screening, Vogel’s approach to programming remains inspiring in its multidisciplinary stance and inexhaustible curiosity towards every dimension of human experience and expression. Special thanks to Thomas Beard, Dennis Lim, and Tyler Wilson (New York Film Festival); Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Brian Belovarac (Janus Films); Sam Bryan (International Film Foundation); Carmel Curtis & Jamie Thomas (Indiana University Moving Image Archive); Skip Elsheimer (A/V Geeks); Dino Everett (USC SCA Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive); Kateřina Fojtová (Czech National Film Archive); Genevieve Fong & David Hertsgaard (Eames Office); Jane Gutteridge (National Film Board of Canada); Kajsa Hedström (Swedish Film Institute); Joyce Herring (Martha Graham Resources); Emily Hubley; David Jennings (Sony); Tanisha Jones & Elena Rossi-Snook (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); Tim Lanza (Cohen Film Collection); Edda Manriquez (Academy Film Archive); Brian Meacham (Yale Film Archive); Seth Mitter (Canyon Cinema); Jacob Perlin (The Film Desk); Corinna Reicher (BFI); Gabe Stetson (W.E.B. DuBois Libraries, University of Massachusetts, Amherst); Katie Trainor (MoMA); and Scott Vickrey. PROGRAM 8: MAY 1959 + FEBRUARY 24, 1960 MAY 1959: [The descriptions for this program are taken from the original Cinema 16 program notes.] John Hubley ADVENTURES OF ASTERISK (1957, 10 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the Film Desk.) Brilliant, witty and highly original attempt to explain the philosophy of modern art not by narrative, but by purely visual means. Vibraphone: Lionel Hampton. Jean Mitry PACIFIC 231 (1949, 12 min, 16mm. Print courtesy of the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.) The nervous rhythm of Arthur Honegger’s celebrated symphonic poem fully captured in a masterpiece of editing and photography. Carmen D’Avino THE ROOM (1959, 5 min, 16mm. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive.) A destitute room, transmuted by the startling magic of stop-motion photography into a luxuriant explosion of color. A new work by D’Avino (THE BIG O). Integration: The Unsolved Problem Lee Bobker & Lester Becker CRISIS IN LEVITTOWN (1957, 32 min, 16mm. Print courtesy of Indiana University Libraries Moving Image Archive.) Unrehearsed and often startling interviews with residents, filmed during disturbances following arrival of first [Black] family. Robert Cannon & John Hubley BROTHERHOOD OF MAN (1947, 11 min, 35mm-to-digital. Courtesy of the National Film Preservation Foundation.) Based on Dr. Benedict’s “races of Mankind”, this triumphant work of film art has already become a contemporary classic. [This program also included a film entitled THE FACE OF THE SOUTH, which was produced by the Department of Social Education and Action of the Presbyterian Church USA in cooperation with the Southern Regional Council, and comprised an illustrated lecture by the then-Executive Director of the SRC, George Mitchell. We were unable to locate this film in any form – instead, we’re combining the May 1959 program with a screening Vogel presented in February 1960. That program was followed by a discussion with James Baldwin; Marshall Stearns (professor and President of the Institute of Jazz Studies); screenwriter Mark Kennedy; and writer and editor Nat Hentoff.] FEBRUARY 1960: Edward Bland THE CRY OF JAZZ (1959, 34 min, 16mm-to-35mm blow-up, b&w. Restored by Anthology Film Archives with funding provided by The Film Foundation. Lab work by Cineric Inc.; sound restoration by BluWave Audio. Additional support from The Orphans Film Symposium.) One of the most radical films of its era and a definitive landmark of the New American Cinema movement. Celebrated by Jonas Mekas and derided by James Baldwin among many others, CRY is one of the earliest and most outspoken documentary films made by an African-American. Produced many years before the blossoming Black Power movement, CRY presents a still controversial and completely riveting analysis of jazz and African-American culture that is as searing as it is honest. Music is provided by the singular Sun Ra and his Arkestra, who are seen and heard performing at the height of their swing heyday. Shot with practically no budget by a volunteer crew numbering some 65 people, THE CRY OF JAZZ was the only film made by Ed Bland who went on to have a distinguished career as composer, arranger, and producer for the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Elvin Jones, and many, many others. Melvin Van Peebles THREE PICKUP MEN FOR HERRICK (1957, 9 min, 35mm-to-digital) “In a desolate urban landscape a group of sad [Black and White men] compete with each other in an ageless ritual. A strange blend of lyricism and social commentary.” –GROVE PRESS FILM CATALOG Total running time: ca. 115 min.

Tuesday 26, October

FREE: Whistle and I'll Come to You+Robin Redbreast

FREE: Whistle and I'll Come to You+Robin Redbreast

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). FREE SCREENINGS! Jonathan Miller WHISTLE AND I’LL COME TO YOU (1968, 42 min, 16mm-to-digital) “A masterpiece of economical horror that remains every bit as chilling as the day it was first broadcast, this was the first, and arguably the best, of the M.R. James adaptations that peppered BBC schedules during the late 1960s and 70s, and an advance warning of a new tradition of Christmas ghost stories. […] Absorbing the lessons of Val Lewton’s legendary team at RKO Studios in the early 1940s…Miller uses suggestion rather than direct representation, and builds and sustains an eerie atmosphere with a diverse array of stylistic devices – exaggerated sound and lighting effects, high and low camera angles, disorienting extreme close-ups, teasingly obstructing our view with trees, railings or other objects. The ghostly manifestations, particularly the Professor’s dream/hallucination on the beach, conjure terror from the minimum of special effects.” –Mark Duguid, BFI SCREENONLINE & James McTaggart ROBIN REDBREAST (1970, 70 min, 16mm-to-digital. Written by John Bowen.) Well-known in the UK, where it was broadcast on television as part of the extraordinary “Play for Today” strand, but relatively obscure in the U.S., ROBIN REDBREAST is a particularly pure example of folk horror, and an unmistakable influence on THE WICKER MAN. Norah Palmer (Anna Cropper) is a television script editor who temporarily moves to a remote English country village to rebuild her life. At first, she finds that the villagers are friendly, if a little eccentric. When she becomes pregnant after a dalliance with the handsome villager Rob, she begins to suspect the locals of conspiring against her, preventing her from leaving the village for her home in London. Combining unsettling folk rituals and insular regional communities, with a tone that’s at once absurdist and genuinely scary, ROBIN REDBREAST was directed by the renowned producer/director James McTaggart, from a script by John Bowen, who was responsible for numerous memorable teleplays and novels during the 1960s-80s.

Saturday 30, October

Let's Scare Jessica to Death

Let's Scare Jessica to Death

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). John Hancock LET’S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH (1971, 89 min, 16mm) “A forgotten gem of a fascinating period of U.S. filmmaking. Though it has the title of a horror film and a few obligatory scares, by and large it’s a nuanced drama about mental illness. The title character is a timid woman recently released from a psychiatric ward; she and her husband move to a small town to start life over at a calmer pace. The title promises a psychotic breakdown and it does occur, but it arrives slowly and sadly. Jessica claims to be haunted by the ghost of a local story she hears, but (as in a Val Lewton film) her greatest fear is of herself. […] In its central relationship (and the complexity with which it’s portrayed) the film often resembles Ingmar Bergman’s THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY, though it’s hardly a slavish Bergman imitation in the way that Woody Allen’s would be in the 80s and 90s. JESSICA shares with other enduring American films of its era a proud sense of regionalism and a tone that’s generally conversational and unpretentious.” –Ben Sachs, CINE-FILE

Sunday 31, October

Messiah of Evil

Messiah of Evil

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz MESSIAH OF EVIL (1973, 90 min, 35mm.) “MESSIAH OF EVIL marks the unsettling directorial debut by husband and wife team Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck, who were later to become screenwriting collaborators on AMERICAN GRAFFITI and INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM, among other films. When a woman arrives at a small seaside town to visit her artist father, all she finds is an empty house and his bizarre journal entries of warnings. As she searches for him in vain, she encounters an interesting trio researching an old legend about a ‘Blood Moon.’ They soon learn the secret of the town, one that has turned the local dead into eye-bleeding, flesh-eating zombies who terrorize all in this slow-paced, peculiarly moody classic of low-budget American independent filmmaking.” –HARVARD FILM ARCHIVE Preceded by: Larry Yust THE LOTTERY (1969, 18 min, 16mm. Provided with permission from Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc.) Produced by Encyclopædia Britannica as an educational film, this adaptation of Shirley Jackson’s famously chilling short story was a classroom staple throughout the 1970s, and surely one of the most disturbing films to be intentionally unleashed on young minds (aside of course from those predicated on grisly car crashes). THE LOTTERY was directed by Larry Yust (the son of longtime Encyclopædia Britannica editor-in-chief Walter Yust), a prolific director of educational films who would go on to make the cult classic HOMEBODIES (1974). It also features the screen debut of the great Ed Begley Jr.

Saturday 30, October

Murrain

Murrain

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). John Cooper MURRAIN (1975, 55 min, 16mm-to-digital. Written by Nigel Kneale.) British writer Nigel Kneale is one of the most interesting figures of postwar British film and television. He’s best known – both in the UK and beyond – for his “Quatermass” serials (originally created for television, but successfully adapted for the big screen by Hammer Film Productions), while within Great Britain he’s also acclaimed for his 1954 television adaptation of Orwell’s NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, his modern ghost story THE STONE TAPE (1972), and other works. Most of his films and teleplays lean towards science fiction or conventional horror, but MURRAIN – made for the short-lived anthology series “Against the Crowd” – is nothing if not folk horror. MURRAIN concerns a veterinarian who arrives in a small village in order to treat a virus afflicting the local livestock, only to discover that the villagers have already diagnosed the problem: a solitary old woman who they’re convinced is a witch. Engaging with the themes of reason, superstition, prejudice, and gender conflict that course throughout the genre, MURRAIN is a beautifully understated but peerlessly unsettling example of the form. PLUS: A SURPRISE SHORT FILM!

Sunday 31, October

The Blood on Satan's Claw

The Blood on Satan's Claw

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Piers Haggard THE BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW (1970, 93 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the Martin Scorsese Collection/The Museum of Modern Art, New York.) “Patrick Wymark plays a local judge skeptical of fears relating to the supernatural, but who is forced to reckon with the strange happenings in his town: children discovering strange body parts and then mysteriously losing their own, people falling ill and going mad, not to mention the group of young people who have decided to form a coven and stage their own Black Mass. […] THE BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW…impressively captures malevolence as an all-encompassing, almost cosmic energy, a force that permeates both people and the air they breathe and the ground on which they walk. If there is a true spiritual forebear for the small yet highly-discussed wave of modern films that are revisiting folk horror, it’s this one.” –Stephanie Monohan, SCREEN SLATE

Friday 29, October

The Two Sights

The Two Sights

NY THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! Joshua Bonnetta THE TWO SIGHTS (2020, 90 min, DCP. Distributed by The Cinema Guild.) The first solo feature from Joshua Bonnetta, THE TWO SIGHTS (AN DÀ SHEALLADH) explores the disappearing tradition of second sight in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Devoting the soundtrack to locals’ accounts of haunting experiences – phantom horses, ghost voices, and other supernatural phenomena – Bonnetta connects their testimonies with striking 16mm images and a carefully-curated sonic montage of the physical and aural environment of these enchanted islands. THE TWO SIGHTS is an ethnographic marvel of non-fiction filmmaking that thrills the eyes and ears and invites us into the extra-sensory beyond. “In the past, the gift of receiving visual or aural signs from the future was handed down from generation to generation on the Outer Hebrides islands off the Scottish coast. Between 2017 and 2019, Canadian artist Joshua Bonnetta set about exploring their landscapes and collecting the oral history of this visionary gift. As in his previous documentary feature, EL MAR LA MAR, co-directed with J.P. Sniadecki in the Sonoran desert, this work of ethnographic collection creates a sensorial world populated by ghosts: stories of engulfed villages, beached whales, drowned horses, Gaelic songs, and voices carrying messages of personal or community events. A project stamped with historical materialism yet no less deeply formalist, if we recall that P. Adams Sitney famously described the North American avant-garde as visionary; and that Bonnetta is no less of a filmmaker than an acoustician. The two sights in the title are those of a film in which image and sound each follow their own course while also being portents that interact in a game of anticipation, of echoes and unison. At times on alert, at times in torpor, the spectator is enveloped in a world as vivid as it is unreal; ‘a thin place’ in the words of a woman whose beautiful consolatory singing stirs the sea into soft ripples, at the extremely thin frontier between sky and sea, between foreknowledge and memory.” –Antoine Thirion, CINÉMA DU RÉEL Immediately following the week-long engagement of THE TWO SIGHTS, Anthology will present the series “Folk Horror” (Oct 28-Nov 11). That program will highlight a subgenre of horror films that could almost be kissing cousins of THE TWO SIGHTS, which evokes some of the same atmosphere in a nonfictional context.

Friday 22, October

Saturday 23, October

Monday 25, October

Tuesday 26, October

Wednesday 27, October

Thursday 28, October

Show Future Dates
The Wicker Man (Final Cut)

The Wicker Man (Final Cut)

R

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Robin Hardy THE WICKER MAN (Final Cut) (1973, 94 min, 35mm-to-DCP. With Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, and Britt Ekland.) After receiving an anonymous letter about a missing 12-year-old girl, devoutly Christian Police Sergeant Neil Howie (Woodward) travels by seaplane to a remote Scottish island to investigate. But the islanders welcome neither his badge nor religious devotion, for Lord Summerisle (Christopher Lee) and his devoted followers worship only the pagan gods of old – and those gods demand a sacrifice. Howie fears for the missing girl’s life and follows every possible lead to find her – despite the islanders’ interference – before she becomes a human sacrificial lamb.

Saturday 30, October

Viy

Viy

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Georgiy Kropachyov & Konstantin Ershov VIY (1967, 78 min, 35mm-to-digital. In Russian with English subtitles.) Based on the classic novella by Nikolai Gogol – and previously adapted by Mario Bava as BLACK SUNDAY – the first horror film ever produced in the Soviet Union remains genuinely frightening. In 19th century Russia, a seminary student is forced to spend three nights with the corpse of a beautiful young witch. But when she rises from the dead to seduce him, it will summon a nightmare of fear, desire, and the ultimate demonic mayhem.

Sunday 31, October

Witchfinder General

Witchfinder General

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Michael Reeves WITCHFINDER GENERAL aka THE CONQUEROR WORM (1968, 86 min, 35mm. With Vincent Price and Ian Ogilvy.) One of the highpoints of 1960s horror cinema, WITCHFINDER GENERAL is a fictionalized account of 17th-century witch-hunter Matthew Hopkins, who, claiming to have been appointed “Witch Finder Generall” by Parliament during the English Civil War, proceeded to wreak murderous havoc throughout the country. Terrifically entertaining and genuinely horrific, as much for its unflinching portrait of moral corruption as for its depiction of archaic torture and execution, WITCHFINDER GENERAL was released in the U.S. as THE CONQUEROR WORM in order to capitalize on the success of Roger Corman’s and Vincent Price’s recent series of Poe adaptations. Graced with an uncharacteristically restrained but altogether extraordinary performance from Price, and helmed by the gifted Michael Reeves (SHE BEAST, THE SORCERERS), who died of an overdose at the age of 25 shortly after completing the film, it’s a peerlessly chilling masterpiece.

Friday 29, October

Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched

Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched

Inspired by Kier-La Janisse’s new documentary, WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series explores the subject matter of Janisse’s extraordinary work of filmic scholarship and excavation: the sub-genre of “folk horror.” A stubbornly slippery and multi-faceted category, the many different manifestations and dimensions of which Janisse thoroughly and perceptively traces, folk horror in its purest form centers on rural communities or landscapes that gradually reveal a hidden world of shadowy rituals and ancient belief systems persisting beneath the surface of society, subverting and calling into question the supposedly scientific certainties of our rational modern civilization. On a more metaphorical level, folk horror films often posit the “folk” themselves as a source of dread – in film after film, civilized, individualistic city dwellers find themselves in rural environments teeming with dark powers, secret societies, and communities tied together into an impenetrable and ghastly unity by their irrational convictions and behaviors. Folk horror’s roots lie in the United Kingdom, in a literary tradition developed by writers like M.R. James and Arthur Machen, which later found expression cinematically in films such as ROBIN REDBREAST, THE WICKER MAN, and the many television adaptations of James’s stories that proliferated in the 1970s. But the genre quickly spread to the U.S. and across the globe, manifesting unmistakably in works like MESSIAH OF EVIL and PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK, and more subtly in DELIVERANCE, WAKE IN FRIGHT, CANDYMAN, and many others. More recently, the genre has seen a major resurgence, with high-profile films including MIDSOMMAR and somewhat more obscure ones such as LA LLORONA, NOVEMBER, and many, many others. Book-ended by two theatrical screenings of WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED, this series showcases a (necessarily limited) sampling of the dozens and dozens of films covered in the documentary. Immediately preceding “Folk Horror”, Anthology hosts the NY theatrical premiere engagement of a film that’s closely related to the genre, albeit in a documentary context: Joshua Bonnetta’s THE TWO SIGHTS (2020). Special thanks to Kier-La Janisse; Johanna Bauman (Pratt Institute Libraries); Bret Berg & Ivan Peycheff (American Genre Film Archive); Chris Chouinard (Park Circus); Molly Clarke; Eric Di Bernardo (Rialto Pictures); Carole Dray (BBC); Jack Durwood (Paramount); Harry Guerro; Barbara Hirschfeld; Jason Jackowski (Universal Pictures); Tim Lanza (Cohen Collection); Alistair Leach (Hollywood Classics); Cameron Swanagon (Oscilloscope); Justin Timms (Yellow Veil Pictures); and Orly Yadin (Vermont International Film Festival). Kier-La Janisse WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED: A HISTORY OF FOLK HORROR (2021, 194 min, DCP. Courtesy of Severin Films and the American Genre Film Archive.) WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED explores the folk horror phenomenon from its beginnings in a trilogy of films – Michael Reeves’s WITCHFINDER GENERAL (1968), Piers Haggard’s BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW (1971), and Robin Hardy’s THE WICKER MAN (1973) – through its proliferation on British television in the 1970s and its culturally specific manifestations in American, Asian, Australian, and European horror, to the genre’s revival over the last decade. WOODLANDS is directed by Kier-La Janisse, film writer, programmer, publisher, producer, founder of The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies, and author or editor of numerous books including “House of Psychotic Women: An Autobiographical Topography of Female Neurosis in Horror and Exploitation Films” (2012) and “Satanic Panic: Pop-Cultural Paranoia in the 1980s” (2015). Touching on over 200 films and featuring over 50 interviewees, it investigates the many ways that we alternately celebrate, conceal, and manipulate our own histories in an attempt to find spiritual resonance in our surroundings.

Thursday 28, October