We will be phasing out support for your browser.

Please upgrade to one of these more modern browsers.

Close

Show Times

Thursday 20, January

EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

Thursday 20, January

Friday 21, January

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

Friday 21, January

EC: Pickpocket

EC: Pickpocket

Friday 21, January

Saturday 22, January

EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

Saturday 22, January

EC: Buñuel/Dalí

EC: Buñuel/Dalí

Saturday 22, January

EC: L'Âge d'Or

EC: L'Âge d'Or

Saturday 22, January

Sunday 23, January

EC: Los Olvidados

EC: Los Olvidados

Sunday 23, January

Dr. Chicago

Dr. Chicago

Sunday 23, January

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

Sunday 23, January

Cry Dr. Chicago

Cry Dr. Chicago

Sunday 23, January

EC: Pickpocket

EC: Pickpocket

Sunday 23, January

Monday 24, January

EC: L'Âge d'Or

EC: L'Âge d'Or

Monday 24, January

EC: Los Olvidados

EC: Los Olvidados

Monday 24, January

Tuesday 25, January

EC: Pickpocket

EC: Pickpocket

Tuesday 25, January

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

Tuesday 25, January

Wednesday 26, January

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Wednesday 26, January

EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

Wednesday 26, January

Thursday 27, January

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Thursday 27, January

Dr. Chicago

Dr. Chicago

Thursday 27, January

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Thursday 27, January

Cry Dr. Chicago

Cry Dr. Chicago

Thursday 27, January

Friday 28, January

EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

Friday 28, January

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Friday 28, January

Saturday 29, January

EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

Saturday 29, January

EC: The Testament of Orpheus

EC: The Testament of Orpheus

Saturday 29, January

EC: Gold Rush

EC: Gold Rush

Saturday 29, January

Sunday 30, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 1

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 1

Sunday 30, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 2

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 2

Sunday 30, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 3

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 3

Sunday 30, January

Monday 31, January

EC: Gold Rush

EC: Gold Rush

Monday 31, January

EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

Monday 31, January

Saturday 9, April

Hong-Kong-a-Thon Part III: Hong Kong Never Dies!

Hong-Kong-a-Thon Part III: Hong Kong Never Dies!

Saturday 9, April

Cry Dr. Chicago

Cry Dr. Chicago

As a special tribute to renowned avant-garde composer Alvin Lucier, who passed away on December 1 at the age of 90, we present rare screenings of George Manupelli’s bizarre and hilarious DR. CHICAGO (1968) and CRY DR. CHICAGO (1971), both of which are graced with peerlessly deadpan performances by Lucier as the titular sex-change-surgeon. Manupelli was a prime mover in the highly original, deeply influential ONCE Group, which was comprised of composers, musicians, and artists including composer Robert Ashley, performer Mary Ashley, and dancer Steve Paxton, all of whom Manupelli enlisted for the cast of the DR. CHICAGO films (which also include RIDE DR. CHICAGO RIDE, and a fourth film, DR. CHICAGO GOES TO SWEDEN, which Manupelli destroyed). But it’s Lucier who steals the show. A composer celebrated for his radical and pioneering experiments in avant-garde music, his sound installations, and his investigations into the nature of auditory phenomena, Lucier created seminal music performances and compositions such as “I Am Sitting in a Room” (1969), “Music on a Long Thin Wire” (1977), and “Nothing Is Real” (1990). But in addition to his immense accomplishments as a composer, Lucier proves to be a natural on-screen performer in the DR. CHICAGO films, with an effortlessly charismatic and unexpectedly comic flair. A true renaissance man, if ever there was one! The screening of CRY DR. CHICAGO on Sunday, January 23 will be introduced by Andrew Lampert. Lampert has produced an eclectic and extensive body of films, videos, performances and photographs since the late 1990s, writes frequently on art and cinema, and has edited or co-edited THE GEORGE KUCHAR READER (Primary Information, 2014), MANUEL DELANDA: ISM ISM (J&L Books, 2018), and TONY CONRAD: WRITINGS (Primary Information, 2019). During his time as Archivist at Anthology from 2002-15, he restored numerous films, and also curated the film series “Eye & Ear Controlled”, which helped bring the DR. CHICAGO films back to light. George Manupelli CRY DR. CHICAGO (1971, 90 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation. Lab work by Cineric, Inc., and Trackwise.) In Manupelli’s wonderfully cracked feature, which had fallen almost entirely into oblivion when Anthology was able to revive and preserve it in 2008, Dr. Chicago (played by venerable composer Alvin Lucier) is a sex-change surgeon on the run from the law, forever on his way to Sweden and always out to make a buck. Along for the ride are his faithful companions Sheila Marie (the delightfully zonked-out Mary Ashley) and Steve (brilliantly, and silently, portrayed by the great dancer Steve Paxton, a founding member of Judson Dance Theater). By far one of the most enjoyable feature films to come out of the 1960s underground era. Sun, Jan 23 screening introduced by Andrew Lampert.

Sunday 23, January

Thursday 27, January

Show Future Dates
Dr. Chicago

Dr. Chicago

As a special tribute to renowned avant-garde composer Alvin Lucier, who passed away on December 1 at the age of 90, we present rare screenings of George Manupelli’s bizarre and hilarious DR. CHICAGO (1968) and CRY DR. CHICAGO (1971), both of which are graced with peerlessly deadpan performances by Lucier as the titular sex-change-surgeon. Manupelli was a prime mover in the highly original, deeply influential ONCE Group, which was comprised of composers, musicians, and artists including composer Robert Ashley, performer Mary Ashley, and dancer Steve Paxton, all of whom Manupelli enlisted for the cast of the DR. CHICAGO films (which also include RIDE DR. CHICAGO RIDE, and a fourth film, DR. CHICAGO GOES TO SWEDEN, which Manupelli destroyed). But it’s Lucier who steals the show. A composer celebrated for his radical and pioneering experiments in avant-garde music, his sound installations, and his investigations into the nature of auditory phenomena, Lucier created seminal music performances and compositions such as “I Am Sitting in a Room” (1969), “Music on a Long Thin Wire” (1977), and “Nothing Is Real” (1990). But in addition to his immense accomplishments as a composer, Lucier proves to be a natural on-screen performer in the DR. CHICAGO films, with an effortlessly charismatic and unexpectedly comic flair. A true renaissance man, if ever there was one! The screening of CRY DR. CHICAGO on Sunday, January 23 will be introduced by Andrew Lampert. Lampert has produced an eclectic and extensive body of films, videos, performances and photographs since the late 1990s, writes frequently on art and cinema, and has edited or co-edited THE GEORGE KUCHAR READER (Primary Information, 2014), MANUEL DELANDA: ISM ISM (J&L Books, 2018), and TONY CONRAD: WRITINGS (Primary Information, 2019). During his time as Archivist at Anthology from 2002-15, he restored numerous films, and also curated the film series “Eye & Ear Controlled”, which helped bring the DR. CHICAGO films back to light. George Manupelli DR. CHICAGO (1968, 110 min, 16mm. With Alvin Lucier, Mary Ashley, Steve Paxton. Sound by Robert Ashley.) This film was preserved through the Avant-Garde Masters program funded by the Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation. Revered avant-garde composer Alvin Lucier gives an unexpected, uproarious performance as the singular Dr. Alvin Chicago, a sex-change surgeon on the run from the law. Accompanied into the unknown woods by his girlfriend, his nurse, an ailing patient, and a Harpo Marx-esque silent stranger, the good Dr. soon finds that there are many obstacles on the road to Sweden. Filled with Warhol-ian long-takes, semi-improvised scenes and exquisite black-and-white photography, DR. CHICAGO is entirely unique, an atmospheric screwball comedy.

Sunday 23, January

Thursday 27, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Beauty and the Beast

EC: Beauty and the Beast

(LA BELLE ET LA BÊTE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Jean Cocteau’s first full-length movie is perhaps the most sensuously elegant of all filmed fairy tales. As a child escapes from everyday daily life to the magic of a storybook, so, in the film, Beauty’s farm, with its Vermeer simplicity, fades in intensity as we are caught up in the Gustave Doré extravagance of the Beast’s enchanted landscape. In Christian Bérard’s makeup, Jean Marais is a magnificent Beast.” –Pauline Kael

Thursday 27, January

Friday 28, January

Monday 31, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Buñuel/Dalí

EC: Buñuel/Dalí

Luis Buñuel & Salvador Dalí UN CHIEN ANDALOU (1928, 22 min, 35mm, b&w) Twenty-two minutes of pure, scandalous dream-imagery, a stream of images from which anything that could be given a rational meaning was rigorously excluded. It remains the unsurpassed masterpiece of the surrealist cinema. Luis Buñuel LAND WITHOUT BREAD / LAS HURDES: TIERRA SIN PAN (1932, 28 min, 35mm, b&w. With English narration.) “A documentary describing, matter-of-factly, a region of Spain so ravaged by epidemic poverty that there our worst fantasies find their objective correlative.” –Raymond Durgnat Total running time: ca. 55 min.

Saturday 22, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 1

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 1

SHORT FILMS BY CHARLIE CHAPLIN “It is stupid to treat Charlie as a clown of genius. If there had never been a cinema he would undoubtedly have been a clown of genius, but the cinema has allowed him to raise the comedy of circus and music hall to the highest aesthetic level. Chaplin needed the medium of the cinema to free comedy completely from the limits of space and time imposed by the stage or the circus arena. […] [The] best Chaplin films can be seen over and over again with no loss of pleasure – indeed the very opposite is the case. It is doubtless a fact that the satisfaction derived from certain gags is inexhaustible, so deep does it lie, but it is furthermore supremely true that comic form and aesthetic value owe nothing to surprise. The latter is exhausted the first time around and is replaced by a much more subtle pleasure, namely the delight of anticipating and recognizing perfection.” –André Bazin, WHAT IS CINEMA CHARLES CHAPLIN, PROGRAM 1 All the Chaplin shorts in this and the following programs are silent. A WOMAN (1915, 20 min, 16mm) EASY STREET (1917, 19 min, 16mm) A DOG’S LIFE (1918, 33 min, 35mm) Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Sunday 30, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 2

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 2

SHORT FILMS BY CHARLIE CHAPLIN “It is stupid to treat Charlie as a clown of genius. If there had never been a cinema he would undoubtedly have been a clown of genius, but the cinema has allowed him to raise the comedy of circus and music hall to the highest aesthetic level. Chaplin needed the medium of the cinema to free comedy completely from the limits of space and time imposed by the stage or the circus arena. […] [The] best Chaplin films can be seen over and over again with no loss of pleasure – indeed the very opposite is the case. It is doubtless a fact that the satisfaction derived from certain gags is inexhaustible, so deep does it lie, but it is furthermore supremely true that comic form and aesthetic value owe nothing to surprise. The latter is exhausted the first time around and is replaced by a much more subtle pleasure, namely the delight of anticipating and recognizing perfection.” –André Bazin, WHAT IS CINEMA CHARLES CHAPLIN, PROGRAM 2 SHOULDER ARMS (1918, 37 min, 35mm) A DAY’S PLEASURE (1919, 19 min, 35mm) THE IDLE CLASS (1921, 32 min, 35mm) Total running time: ca. 95 min.

Sunday 30, January

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 3

EC: Charles Chaplin, Program 3

SHORT FILMS BY CHARLIE CHAPLIN “It is stupid to treat Charlie as a clown of genius. If there had never been a cinema he would undoubtedly have been a clown of genius, but the cinema has allowed him to raise the comedy of circus and music hall to the highest aesthetic level. Chaplin needed the medium of the cinema to free comedy completely from the limits of space and time imposed by the stage or the circus arena. […] [The] best Chaplin films can be seen over and over again with no loss of pleasure – indeed the very opposite is the case. It is doubtless a fact that the satisfaction derived from certain gags is inexhaustible, so deep does it lie, but it is furthermore supremely true that comic form and aesthetic value owe nothing to surprise. The latter is exhausted the first time around and is replaced by a much more subtle pleasure, namely the delight of anticipating and recognizing perfection.” –André Bazin, WHAT IS CINEMA CHARLES CHAPLIN, PROGRAM 3 PAY DAY (1922, 22 min, 35mm) THE PILGRIM (1923, 41 min, 35mm) Total running time: ca. 70 min.

Sunday 30, January

EC: Gold Rush

EC: Gold Rush

by Charles Chaplin One of the most celebrated and beloved of all silent films, THE GOLD RUSH features Chaplin’s most distinctive alter-ego, the Little Tramp, as he wins fortune and love in the Yukon. Filled with impressive sight gags and heartrending pathos, the film deserves its reputation as one of the touchstones of modern comedy. This version features Chaplin’s own music and poetic narration, added for the 1942 reissue.

Saturday 29, January

Monday 31, January

Show Future Dates
EC: L'Âge d'Or

EC: L'Âge d'Or

by Luis Buñuel & Salvador Dalí In French with English subtitles. “The story is a sequence of moral and surrealist aesthetics. The sexual instinct and the sense of death form the substance of the film. It is a romantic film performed in full surrealistic frenzy.” – Luis Buñuel

Saturday 22, January

Monday 24, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

EC: Les Dames Du Bois De Bologne

by Robert Bresson In French with English subtitles. Archival print courtesy of the Institut Français. Taken from an episode in Diderot’s eighteenth-century novel, and updated to the lush social tranquility of occupied Paris, Bresson’s film is dominated by two characters: Maria Casares (in her best screen performance), spinning her vengeful web in a white setting full of rare furnishings, and Elina Labourdette, dancing in her apartment in black stockings and top hat. Stylish Cocteau dialogue, elegant photography, and a symbolist sensibility enrich the ornate melodramatics.

Thursday 20, January

Saturday 22, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Los Olvidados

EC: Los Olvidados

(THE FORGOTTEN ONES) by Luis Buñuel In Spanish with English subtitles. “Buñuel shows the sad condition of the poor without embellishing them, because if there is one thing Buñuel hates it is that artificial sweetness imparted to all the poor which we so frequently see in the traditional film. If, as usually happens in motion pictures, the moral principles approved by conventional society are carefully observed by members of the poorest classes…then these principles have some universal validity. However, Buñuel is concerned with exposing the opposite.” –Emilio Garcia Riera, FILM CULTURE “[LOS OLVIDADOS] lashes the mind like a red-hot iron and leaves one’s conscience no opportunity to rest.” –André Bazin

Sunday 23, January

Monday 24, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Orpheus

EC: Orpheus

(ORPHÉE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Orpheus could only exist on the screen. A drama of the visible and the invisible, ORPHEUS’s Death is like a spy who falls in love with the person being spied upon. The myth of immortality.” –Jean Cocteau

Wednesday 26, January

Thursday 27, January

Saturday 29, January

Show Future Dates
EC: Pickpocket

EC: Pickpocket

by Robert Bresson In French with English subtitles. A magnificent drama about a thief, his techniques, motives, and secret existence. The plot is modeled loosely on Dostoevsky’s CRIME AND PUNISHMENT, but the rigorous intensity of the treatment is pure Bresson, as he tells the compelling story of an insignificant man who drifts into crime and finally finds grace in a prison cell. The famous scene of the pickpocket’s magical raid on a train station ranks as one of the great tours-de-force of French cinema.

Friday 21, January

Sunday 23, January

Tuesday 25, January

Show Future Dates
EC: The Blood of a Poet

EC: The Blood of a Poet

(LE SANG D’UN POÈTE) by Jean Cocteau In French with English subtitles. “Adolescent angels wandering about, black boxers with perfect bodies taking flight, school-children in capes killing each other with snowballs, a mirror becomes a swimming pool, and the hallways of a furnished hotel turn into a labyrinth.” –Georges Sadoul

Wednesday 26, January

Friday 28, January

Show Future Dates
EC: The Testament of Orpheus

EC: The Testament of Orpheus

(LE TESTAMENT D’ORPHÉE) by Jean Cocteau In French with projected English subtitles. In his last film, Cocteau himself portrays an 18th-century poet who travels through time on a quest for divine wisdom. In a mysterious wasteland, he meets several symbolic phantoms that bring about his death and resurrection. With an eclectic cast that includes Pablo Picasso, Jean-Pierre Leáud, Jean Marais, and Yul Brynner, TESTAMENT OF ORPHEUS brings full circle the journey Cocteau began in THE BLOOD OF A POET, an exploration of the torturous relationship between the artist and his creations. “This film has for a plot the manner in which life charges itself with the nourishment of dreams. Further, my own life is necessarily reflected and interpreted therein, though it is unintentional. Neither head, nor tail, but a soul.” –Jean Cocteau

Saturday 29, January

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

EC:A Man Escaped Or The Wind Blows Where It Liseth

(UN CONDAMNÉ À MORT S’EST ÉCHAPPÉ, OU LE VENT SOUFFLE OÙ IL VEUT) by Robert Bresson In French with English subtitles. With the simplest of concepts and sparest of techniques, Bresson made one of the most suspenseful jailbreak films of all time. Based on the account of an imprisoned French Resistance leader, this unbelievably taut and methodical marvel follows the fictional Fontaine’s single-minded pursuit of freedom, detailing the planning and execution of his escape with gripping precision. But Bresson’s film is not merely about process – it’s also a work of intense spirituality and humanity.

Friday 21, January

Sunday 23, January

Tuesday 25, January

Show Future Dates
Hong-Kong-a-Thon Part III: Hong Kong Never Dies!

Hong-Kong-a-Thon Part III: Hong Kong Never Dies!

Subway Cinema presents The Hong-Kong-a-Thon Part III: Hong Kong Never Dies! They said it was over. They said it couldn’t happen again. But just when you thought it was safe to go back into movie theaters...the Hong-Kong-a-Thon returns! Six movies! All on 35mm! Almost 12 hours of some of the gnarliest, scariest, weirdest, wildest movies from Hong Kong flying through your eyes and giving your brain a deep tissue massage...with their fists! We won’t announce the titles until they appear on screen because it’s more fun that way, but trust us, you’ll never be the same again. We dug deep and found prints for some lost classics that never made it onto DVD or blu ray. In fact, some of these movies are only available on VHS, and we’ve never even heard of three of them getting projected since their release dates. Made between 1987 and 1993, these movies are out to hurt you, and you’re going to love every second of it. More info at www.subwaycinema.com

Saturday 9, April